Kars's Reviews > Play Anything: The Pleasure of Limits, the Uses of Boredom, and the Secret of Games

Play Anything by Ian Bogost
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really liked it
bookshelves: games, non-fiction, top-of-the-pile

"There is something profoundly humble about things in the wild."

This is basically Bogost's version of play theory from a OOO perspective. It's laden with an eclectic selection of essayistic meditations on specific consumer products, media, art, and more, all of which to argue that play really is about the work of working a thing, and that fun emerges from a rejection of irony and mindfulness and an acceptance of things as they are.

This is at times brilliant, but I am also somewhat uneasy about how all of this could be used to justify a deeply conservative world view. I know Bogost rejects romanticism and radicalism as basically dishonest. And I think he intends his philosophy of worldfulness as something actually radical—in stead of the hipster posturing often found in art and design circles—but he doesn't entirely convince on that front.
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Reading Progress

April 13, 2016 – Shelved
April 13, 2016 – Shelved as: games
April 13, 2016 – Shelved as: to-read
April 13, 2016 – Shelved as: non-fiction
October 4, 2016 – Shelved as: to-read
October 4, 2016 – Shelved as: top-of-the-pile
August 26, 2018 – Started Reading
September 15, 2018 –
10.0%
September 16, 2018 –
11.0%
September 23, 2018 –
23.0%
September 29, 2018 –
24.0%
October 1, 2018 –
36.0%
October 16, 2018 –
40.0%
October 30, 2018 –
60.0%
November 5, 2018 –
78.0%
November 6, 2018 –
72.0%
November 7, 2018 – Finished Reading

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