Ayesha's Reviews > I Am Malala: The Story of the Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban

I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai
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did not like it
bookshelves: 2016, non-fiction, bilkul-bakwas-thi




EDIT: 6/9/2016
---The people who are bashing me, Kindly take a look at the quotes or in the comment section. After some of the gif-y juvenile opinions, the discussion is rather educating.

Dearest Malaala,

---Why did you write an emotionally manipulative story specifically directed at international readers and compelling them to feel sorry about a nation using the lethal weapon of exaggeration and one sided execution of truth.I always thought why Malaala and not someone else as everything about your story is neat.Too neat.You might be a fugitive for all I care but why ruin an already bad reputation by pointing out all the controversial issues of the last 20 years about a country you claim to love.I'm not even a religious or patriotic person but after reading your sobstory I feel like becoming one by kindly pointing out all the BS.I expected you to be a peacemaker not a pacemaker,Since you won a Nobel prize for peace.You made me fight with a lot of people(who don't know the first thing about Pakistan just like I still don't know what the hell Starbucks is).(view spoiler) Aren't All the "ugly truths" you like pointing out so very much subjective matters and cant be explained as one liners.So, I want to be mean to you because you make my whole existence look bad.

You are a show off:(
--We don't need to know about how high and mighty and how different from every girl you are in like every chapter.You wrote an autobiography at 16,Please let us judge for ourselves.

*‘Don’t you think she is meant for the skies?’

*‘Malala is not just the daughter of Ziauddin,’ they would say; ‘she is the daughter of all of us.’

*‘Malala is free as a bird.’


*On some shelves were all the gold-coloured plastic cups and trophies I had won for coming first in my class. Only twice had I not come top – both times when I was beaten by my class rival Malka e-Noor. I was determined it would not happen again.

*‘Malala was a lucky girl,’ says Hidayatullah. ‘When she was born our luck changed.

*My parents say I have qualities of both grandfathers – humorous and wise like my mother’s father and vocal like my father’s father!


Why do you hate the army everyone except the Bhutto-Zardari clan?

*My country may not be very old but unfortunately it already has a history of military coups, and when my father was eight a general called Zia ul-Haq seized power. There are still many pictures of him around. He was a scary man with dark panda shadows around his eyes, large teeth that seemed to stand to attention and hair pomaded flat on his head. He arrested our elected prime minister, Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, and had him tried for treason then hanged from a scaffold in Rawalpindi jail. Even today people talk of Mr Bhutto as a man of great charisma. They say he was the first Pakistani leader to stand up for the common people, though he himself was a feudal lord with vast estates of mango fields. His execution shocked everybody and made Pakistan
look bad all around the world.
--------->Isn't that exactly what you are doing.

*Thanks to President Zardari and his family, whose love and
care kept me strong.
------>This was in the acknowledgements section.
I won't be surprised at all if she ends up getting married to Bilawal Bhutto Zardari and having his 2.5 kids,You know.

*One day I will be a politician and do these things myself.--------->OH MY GAWD *blink blink*


Now people think we are discriminating:(
*We are a country of 180 million and more than 96 per cent are Muslim. We also have around two million Christians and more than two million Ahmadis, who say they are Muslims though our government says they are not. Sadly those minority communities are often attacked.

*The most important jobs in the army, bureaucracy and government are all taken by Punjabis because they come from the biggest and most powerful province.(maybe because Punjab has the largest population and education to population ratio)

Thanks to you now everyone thinks Pakistan is illiterate:(

*‘I agree that female teachers should educate girls,’ he said. ‘But first we need to educate our girls so they can become teachers!
Anyone living in Pakistan can see how false this statement is since majority of the teachers are women here.


* The boys learn the Quran by heart, rocking back and forth as they recite. They learn that there is no such thing as science or literature, that dinosaurs never existed and that man never went to the moon.


Do you have something against Pakistani Doctors?

*In our country few doctors bother explaining anything to an illiterate woman.

*In fact the Pakistani doctors had shaved my head with no mercy.

*internal scream*

*internal scream*



TO BE HONEST I CAN FIND A THOUSAND FAULTS, BUT I'M TOO TIRED AND I'M GLAD THIS MENTAL ABUSE IS OVER.

P.S if you've some time, Read this fellow goodreader's review






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Reading Progress

January 6, 2016 – Shelved
February 17, 2016 – Started Reading
February 20, 2016 –
page 100
30.58% "My father says the problem is that Jinnah negotiated a piece of real estate for us but not a state.\n HUH?*screams internally*"
February 21, 2016 – Finished Reading

Comments Showing 1-50 of 135 (135 new)


message 1: by Jasmin (new)

Jasmin YUP it happens all the time... well atleast to me it does!
I end up no enjoying the book and sometimes not even finishing it (covering my eyes)


Ayesha I know I'm not going to enjoy it,But I'll definitely enjoy dissecting it.*deep exhale*


message 3: by Aeron (new)

Aeron Trahaearn YES I ALREADY HATE THIS BOOK!!


Ayesha Aeron wrote: "YES I ALREADY HATE THIS BOOK!!"

I think I love you!!!!!


Maira i am right there with u buddy. i have read the book and it is so full of BS that u want to bitch slap Malala in the face. trust me.


Ayesha

I think I was alone in hating Malala:))


message 7: by Aeron (new)

Aeron Trahaearn this just proves that this country is full of brilliant women!!! (LIKE ME!!)



Ayesha Aeron wrote: "this just proves that this country is full of brilliant women!!! (LIKE ME!!)
"

Yasssssss!!!! #Girlpower


Eesha Sajid yup.... I definitely do!!!!!!!


Ayesha Eesha wrote: "yup.... I definitely do!!!!!!!"
:))


message 11: by Aeron (new)

Aeron Trahaearn Ayesha wrote: "Aeron wrote: "this just proves that this country is full of brilliant women!!! (LIKE ME!!)
"
Yasssssss!!!! #Girlpower"


soooo true...btw can u believe she won the nobel prize award when J.K Rowling was also a nominee??


Ayesha Kahaan J.K Rowling Kahaan Malala....


message 13: by Aeron (new)

Aeron Trahaearn :P malala =


message 15: by Azka (new)

Azka I hate the title. Its so cliche and unimaginative and boring!


Jasmine Yep, it always happens when judging from the titles or covers. Haha, I'll be the minority here because I do admire her a lot! Well, her speech is quite inspiring and uplifting, though I don't completely agree with the contents in this book. Her other interviews are really so much worth watching.


Ayesha ✔Jasmine✔ wrote: "Yep, it always happens when judging from the titles or covers. Haha, I'll be the minority here because I do admire her a lot! Well, her speech is quite inspiring and uplifting, though I don't compl..."

I'm not judging it by its pretentious title/cover,I just feel she's a fugitive making fun of us.I live in Pakistan,So I definitely see her in a different perspective.Well, she is just someone famous because her daddy is rich.What about all other people who suffered the same consequences but are still nameless.


Ayesha Azka wrote: "I hate the title. Its so cliche and unimaginative and boring!"
Like saying cry for me bitches!


message 19: by Jasmine (last edited Feb 17, 2016 07:26AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Jasmine Ayesha wrote: "Well, she is just someone famous because her daddy is rich.What about all other people who suffered the same consequences but are still nameless. "

Yeah, good points. I do believe there are still a lot of people suffering from it and the solution to inequality in either the right for education or other respects in life is easier said than done. :( So can you relate to the issues she advocates all the time? Or do you feel something else stronger than what they seem? (P.S. If it's too personal to talk about, it's totally okay you don't have to tell me!!! Just curious!)


message 20: by Ayesha (last edited Feb 17, 2016 07:47AM) (new) - rated it 1 star

Ayesha Yusra wrote: "@Maira / @Ayesha - can you please clarify what you mean by BS in this book? I haven't read it myself but I am just curious. I don't hate Malala myself and I am just quite surprised at the level of ..."

I don't hate her Yusra but how she portrays the ordinary Pakistani girl.People see Malaala and they form a idea about people living here.Have you read Anna Frank's diary,It's still relatable after so many years.


message 21: by Zaki (new)

Zaki You all sound like Taliban sympathists.


Ayesha ✔Jasmine✔ wrote: "Ayesha wrote: "Well, she is just someone famous because her daddy is rich.What about all other people who suffered the same consequences but are still nameless. "

Yeah, good points. I do believe t..."


Malaala is turning me into a book extremist,I guess.
Everything is not black and white as she says,A lot of people here are illiterate but at the same time 50,000 people appear in MCAT every year and only 3000 are selected. Not everyone is bad and opposed to education.My parents will kill me if I ever fail an exam.An average Pakistani household just want their kids to get a professional education And I think This demand is present almost everywhere.
P.S You can ask me anything,I'm the queen of TMI:))


Ayesha Zaki wrote: "You all sound like Taliban sympathists."

HOW??


Jasmine Ayesha wrote: "✔Jasmine✔ wrote: "Ayesha wrote: "Well, she is just someone famous because her daddy is rich.What about all other people who suffered the same consequences but are still nameless. "

Yeah, good poin..."


Wow, thanks for the details!!! Though the expectation for their children those parents around the world hold is quite similar, I think it's more obvious and harsh in some specific places where the chance of getting such higher education is very slim. >< Do you think the pros exceed the cons under your kind of circumstances? Like having to compete with tons of students or it's already a common phenomenon so there's no use disobeying it?


message 25: by Eesha (new) - rated it 1 star

Eesha Sajid Aeron wrote: "YES I ALREADY HATE THIS BOOK!!"
i think you are my new best friend :P i totally believe in hate at first sight. and this book is a very healthy specimen of the phenomenon.


Ayesha ✔Jasmine✔ wrote: "Ayesha wrote: "✔Jasmine✔ wrote: "Ayesha wrote: "Well, she is just someone famous because her daddy is rich.What about all other people who suffered the same consequences but are still nameless. "

..."


The pressure to excel can be good or bad depending upon the person.A LOT of people from rural areas with no financial support succeed in getting an education just because of the pressure.Because no one can break the status-quo anywhere.People deal with it because it's part of their lives.


message 27: by Eesha (new) - rated it 1 star

Eesha Sajid Yusra wrote: "@Ayesha - I appreciate that, and I understand that her experience is NOT representative of all girls in Pakistan at all. But at the same time, I do think it's important to realise that there is an ..."
i agree and totally support and second your opinion, education for all, i believe is one of the most subjugated mottoes. but, see, its not just in Pakistan. in fact the literacy rate is actually not as bad as its assumed to be. many, many countries have a lower literacy rate, and i am not only talking about asian or third world countries. world-wide, there is too much depression to be discussed in such meager way. however, flaunting it in the face of the entire world. politically exploiting your image on international level. using UNO as a platform, and we are all fully aware of the might and white UNO inside out. getting a Nobel prize on this base, and then sugar coating it with a beautifully created camouflage of so called compassion, this is precisely what we call propaganda and hypocrisy, and so we quite naturally have to hate it. don't you agree? :)


message 28: by Eesha (last edited Feb 17, 2016 08:22AM) (new) - rated it 1 star

Eesha Sajid Zaki wrote: "You all sound like Taliban sympathists."

hate to break your beautiful-happily-ever-after bubble but there is a massive difference between taliban sympathizing and analyzing a Hippocratic political situation with open eyes


Ayesha Yusra wrote: "@Ayesha - I appreciate that, and I understand that her experience is NOT representative of all girls in Pakistan at all. But at the same time, I do think it's important to realise that there is an ..."
I agree with all your opinions ,Yusra. BUT what has Malaala done for the so called education problem except giving lukewarm speeches.People just get impressed because she was shot but what about all the children who died in KPK attack.The child who took six bullets to his face for the sake of education.Her identity is a huge question mark.Have you seen her brothers,They seem normal with sneakers and british accents.


Ayesha Eesha wrote: "Yusra wrote: "@Ayesha - I appreciate that, and I understand that her experience is NOT representative of all girls in Pakistan at all. But at the same time, I do think it's important to realise tha..."
I think you took words out of my mouth with better vocabulary and grammar:))


message 31: by Zaki (new)

Zaki Yusra wrote: "@Zaki - Like I said, I haven't read the book and I certainly don't hate Malala; on the contrary from what I have seen of her I respect her. I am just trying to approach the issue with an open mind ..."

I shouldn't barge in where I'm not welcome! Yusra I didn't include you in my remark at all. In fact you're the only one who seems to be neutral to the book and I agree with you. I just find it bizarre how others are slating off a book without reading it.


message 32: by Zaki (last edited Feb 17, 2016 12:37PM) (new)

Zaki I feel like an idiot Yusra. An idiot. If anyone needs to apologise it's me and that's to everyone on this thread :)

But I am not calling anyone a taliban sympathiser but saying they sound like it because I imagine that's what the taliban do: knock something without giving it a chance like a book promoting education.


message 33: by Aeron (new)

Aeron Trahaearn ok so i was following this thread and @Zaki I dont think we ar taliban sympathisers... we dont think that what malala fought for was wrong, but i do think her approach is wrong. the rest of the world thinks of us Pakistani's as illiterates, now after Malala's book, even more so. dont you think its against ones country to outline all the bad aspects of it ?? the way Malala has highlighted those aspects make it seem as if thats all there is to Pakistsni's. Believe me when you meet someone from another country you have to work hard now-a-days to change their views of Pakistan, the way we are going right now? people compare us to Somalia .
And let me remind you that literacy rate of pakistan is higher than most countries and our women are more higher qualified than the men....i dont think we shouldnt fight for those who dont get a chance to study but i think our approach should be different. whenever you write about Pakistan, you need to remember this is a miracle of a country and may god bless it for the years to come...


message 34: by Maira (new) - rated it 1 star

Maira First she allowed an American writer, someone who is not all understanding towards our religious context and our suffering, to write the book for her when there are numerous EXCELLENT Pakistani writers who could have written a much better and excelllent version of her book. secondly, her interviews and videos show her lack of understanding for the Pakistani army and her lack of passion for the Army in general. Read her interviews before she became "world famous" THAT is her true version and personality. She gave such a stereotypical view of Pakistan and Islam in the book jis ko daikh k everyone will think k we are barbarians and we should move to the piece of heaven that resides everywhere outside of Pakistan. I Have so much to say to her. Agar mujhe kabhe mokka milla then i will def. say it all to her face. Many people sacrifised themselves for this beautiful country and who the hell is she to criticize it in such a subtle manner! What she went through was tragic but it DID NOT gave her the right to slander MY COUNTRY AND MY ARMY.


message 35: by Maira (new) - rated it 1 star

Maira Plus i would recommend everyone who have read this book also read I am Not Malala. You will get a much clearer perspective of what this whole thing is about.


message 36: by Aeron (new)

Aeron Trahaearn @maira that book is a really good book...i read it as a project and it cleared a lot of things for me
@yusra it isnt necessary to highlight the bad aspects of our country in order to save it! you could work on then without announcing them to the world... I am not saying we should be ignorant but that we should keep our image in our mind. Do you know what this type publicity (of bad aspects) means for our country??
I'll tell you, it means no Player comes to play a league or international match in Pakistan, it means NO foreign dignitaries take us seriously (I mean isnt america always telling us we need to solve our terrorist problem?? DUDE ITS OUR EFFING PROBLEM WE DONT NEED YOUR ADVICE!!) and worst of all?? no one gives this country importance! did you know this is the only country made for the sole purpose of Islam?? The country that was made on Lilat ul Qadar?? dont you think its our duty to fight this country's battles?? and the biggest battle is the preservation of its good name!! sad to say we Pakistani's arent that adept at protecting our country's good name :(


message 37: by Maira (new) - rated it 1 star

Maira Aeron I agree with you. What Pakistan is going through is something only us Pakistani living in Pakistan can truly relate too. And these issues should stay in Pakistan. No one else has the right to comment on it and make it an international debate because she went through something tragic and she has the "means" to make it an international debate about "herself". It was very disappointing for me to read it in her book.


message 38: by Zoha (new)

Zoha Don't be so hard on Malala. After all, she brought Nobel Prize to Pakistan. ;)
And Yes its possible to hate a book even before reading it. It happened to me when I was in grade 9. I saw my curriculum book of Physics and believe me I hated it at the very moment. ( But grew less hateful as the days passed )


Ayesha @ Zoha I certainly don't hate but her autobiography pisses me off.What is even the prospect of writing one when you are a teenager.Yeah,she went through hardships but a lot of women here have faced worse scenarios.BUT are they given a Nobel prize?What about the nameless women who are silent because they can't "afford" to have a voice. She is just playing the third world country card.

I HATED MY PHYSICS BOOK TOO:-)


message 40: by Zoha (new)

Zoha Autobiographies pisses me off too. I myself don't like this girl but I love the idea of Nobel Peace Prize in Pakistan although I truely believe Abdus Sattar Edhi deserved it more than her. And I agree with all you've written about her facade.


Ayesha Yeah,Abdus Sattar Edhi certainly deserves it more than her!


message 42: by Zoha (new)

Zoha :)


message 43: by Aeron (new)

Aeron Trahaearn THATS A TRUE NATIONAL HERO IF THERE WAS EVER ONE....


message 44: by Eesha (new) - rated it 1 star

Eesha Sajid Ayesha wrote: "Kahaan J.K Rowling Kahaan Malala...."

Rowling was a nominee? i didnt think i could hate her even more until now... me ghalat thi!!!!!!!!!!


message 45: by Eesha (new) - rated it 1 star

Eesha Sajid Yusra wrote: "@Eesha - Yes, there is a literacy problem in many countries, but if you come from Pakistan doesn't it make sense to talk about your own country and your own experience? To fix a worldwide problem o..."
i am not saying talking about educational problems on national level is bad on her part. sorry if you got that impression but gaining sympathies by being fake.. that gets on your nerves..doesn't it?


message 46: by Eesha (new) - rated it 1 star

Eesha Sajid Ayesha wrote: "Eesha wrote: "Yusra wrote: "@Ayesha - I appreciate that, and I understand that her experience is NOT representative of all girls in Pakistan at all. But at the same time, I do think it's important ..."
hahaha.... glad someone else shares the views :))


message 47: by Eesha (new) - rated it 1 star

Eesha Sajid Aeron wrote: "ok so i was following this thread and @Zaki I dont think we ar taliban sympathisers... we dont think that what malala fought for was wrong, but i do think her approach is wrong. the rest of the wor..."
i totally second that..


message 48: by Eesha (new) - rated it 1 star

Eesha Sajid Maira wrote: "Aeron I agree with you. What Pakistan is going through is something only us Pakistani living in Pakistan can truly relate too. And these issues should stay in Pakistan. No one else has the right to..."

totally agreed..... i am relieved you made that comment... i couldn't have put it that way myself!


message 49: by Maira (new) - rated it 1 star

Maira Ayesha wrote: "Yeah,Abdus Sattar Edhi certainly deserves it more than her!"

Ditto sister!


message 50: by Aeron (new)

Aeron Trahaearn AGAIN I am sooooo glad pakistan is full of women like you guys!!! keep being awesome sisters!!


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