Lilo's Reviews > The Essiac Report: The True Story of a Canadian Herbal Cancer Remedy and of the Thousands of Lives It Continues to Save

The Essiac Report by Richard  Thomas
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it was amazing
bookshelves: medicine-alternative, non-fiction, read-as-paper-book
Recommended to Lilo by: I had found the book in a health food store.
Recommended for: everyone with an open mind
Read 2 times. Last read January 1, 2011.

I read this book in 2011 when my husband had a cancer scare. (Fortunately, the diagnosis was false.)

I didn't review the book because, in 2011, I had not found Goodreads yet and was also not familiar with Amazon. Since I don't remember details of the book, I can only say that this book is fascinating. It is a worthwhile read whether or not you or any of your loved ones are battling with cancer.

When, in 2013, two of our (then, 31) cats were diagnosed with metastasized cancer and were more dead than alive by August 2013, we treated them with Essiac tea as a last resort.

One of these cats had brain cancer that had metastasized to the bones. She no longer ate or drank and had been force-fed for a week. The other cat was about to suffocate from a throat tumor that was suspected to have metastasized to the head. He had already an appointment for euthanizing.

After being administered the tea, the first cat ate and drank by herself within two days and walked within a week, whereas the second cat improved within hours and was able to go outside a week later. By November 2013, both cats were symptom-free. Both cats relapsed every time they were off the tea (or when the dosage was reduced to maintenance). They recovered again when they were back on the tea. This happened about six times. Both cats are still alive. The first is symptom-free; the second has mild symptoms but is still out and about. (He did not fully recover the last two times when he was off the tea while we were out of town.)

We have treated several other cats with Essiac tea that were suspected to have cancer. (To confirm the diagnosis would have required a MRI, which wasn't available.) They have been doing well. Only one cat died despite of being treated with Essiac tea. She suffered from abdominal lymphoma, which hardly responds to any treatment.

Our vet also believes in the effectiveness of Essiac tea. (His wife took the tea when she was recovering from breast cancer, about 12 years ago, and takes it presently again for her diabetes, for which the tea is also said to be effective.) Our vet calls the recovery of the above-mentioned two cats a miracle that can only be accounted to the tea.

Please note that I neither sell the tea nor am acquainted or affiliated with anyone selling the tea. Neither am I acquainted or affiliated with the author or publisher of the above book.

I know that there are lots of alternative cancer treatments that are clear quackery, but we do believe in the effectiveness of Essiac tea.

I have read 3 books on Essiac tea. I liked them all but found the above book the best. The story of Essiac tea is fascinating, and this book tells it in the most captivating way.

I strongly recommend this book to everybody, not only for the amazing recovery stories but also for an insight about how the pharmaceutical industry suppresses the use and proliferation of herbal cures.


P.S. This review was originally written on Nov. 4, 2015. It was edited and reposted on March 23, 2016. The cat that never recovered completely (each time after having been off the tea) has died on Nov. 18, 2015, yet not from his throat tumor but, most likely, from old age.

P.P.S. November 26, 2017: Orphan Annie, the cat with the brain tumor metastasized to the bones is still alive, symptom-free, and full of mischief. She is completely off the tea since fall of 2015.

P.P.P.S. February 4, 2019: Orphan Annie (meanwhile 16 years old) is still alive, symptom-free, and full of mischief. She is our best jumper and would qualify as a circus cat. I think I never mentioned that she played with a rabid bat when she was a kitten. In order to save our, at the time, 7 not yet vaccinated kittens from being euthanized, we had to comply with the orders of the Health Department, which included a 6-months house-quarantine of all of our (then 35) cats, weekly house vet visits, and my husband and I getting vaccinated against rabies. Total costs: $ 8,000+. Thus, Orphan Annie is probably the most expensive cat in Utah. :-)
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Reading Progress

Finished Reading
Started Reading
January 1, 2011 – Finished Reading
November 1, 2015 – Shelved

Comments Showing 1-35 of 35 (35 new)

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message 1: by Jessie (new) - added it

Jessie Gussman That's quite a convincing testimony! Glad you found something that worked in time to save your cats.


message 2: by Lilo (last edited Nov 05, 2015 10:53PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lilo Jessie wrote: "That's quite a convincing testimony! Glad you found something that worked in time to save your cats."

Yes, the recovery of our two cats came close to a miracle. Both had been severely ill for about 9 months, and our (very good) vet had given up on them.

This was when my husband had the idea to try Essiac tea. I thought at first that this was a crazy idea, but I felt that if this helped my husband cope with the inevitable euthanizing of our Mao, so be it. When Mao improved significantly within hours, we were able to cancel the appointment for euthanizing, which would have been 2 days later.

I, then, suggested to try Essiac tea with Orphan Annie, our favorite cat, whom we had taken home from the vet clinic to die in peace because she did not seem to be in too much pain. My husband thought it was too late for her, as we expected Orphan Annie's death any hour. Every time we passed her cat bed, we checked whether or not she was still breathing. I insisted that we try the tea. Orphan Annie ate and drank by herself two days later and was able to walk to the litter box one week after we had started giving her the tea. Three months later, she was totally symptom-free and full of mischief. If you saw her today, you would never think that she had been close to death.

Goldilocks, a third cat, was diagnosed with a huge tumor in her belly, in September 2013. Our vet was rather sure that this tumor was cancer. Goldilocks did not have any symptoms, except that she drank excessively because of her kidney failure, which had been diagnosed about 2 years earlier. Goldilocks was put on the tea immediately after the tumor diagnosis. Goldilocks remained symptom-free until her death, last May. She died neither of cancer nor of kidney failure. (Her kidney lab results were stable.) Goldilocks died peacefully of old age. She had stopped eating and drinking for 24 hours and stopped breathing while being petted. Goldilocks was 20+ years old.

The other cats that have been doing fine after being treated with Essiac tea may or or may not have had cancer.

P.S. My husband and I take Essiac tea off and on for our bladder problems. It seems to be beneficial. Essiac tea works by strengthening the immune system.


message 3: by MomToKippy (new) - added it

MomToKippy Wow, this is very interesting Lilo. Thank you!


message 4: by Jessie (new) - added it

Jessie Gussman It is interesting! Thanks for taking the time to share your personal experience. Makes me wish I'd have known about it before this past March when our dog died of liver cancer.


Lilo MomToKippy wrote: "Wow, this is very interesting Lilo. Thank you!"

Thanks for your comment MomToKippy.


Lilo Jessie wrote: "It is interesting! Thanks for taking the time to share your personal experience. Makes me wish I'd have known about it before this past March when our dog died of liver cancer."

I am so sorry about your dog. It is always so sad to lose a beloved pet.

I wish I had thought about writing a review of this book earlier. I rarely write reviews of books that I read several years ago, before I joined Goodreads.


message 7: by Lilo (last edited Feb 27, 2016 03:58PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lilo Update:

We were out of town for 5 days, and sadly, while we were away, our Mao died. I don't think it was the cancer that did him in. It was more likely old age (he was 15+ years old) and/or kidney failure. (Almost all cats get kidney disease when they are old.)

Essiac tea had added 2 years and 3 months to Mao's life. (Orphan Annie is in great shape and fully aware of the fact that she is a very special cat.)


Lilo Update: I have, meanwhile, shared our experience with Essiac tea with other cat owners whose cats suffer from cancer and were in bad shape. Their cats also improved as soon as they were treated with the tea. (It is still too soon to tell whether or not they will survive.) In case anyone is interested, here is the link to the "Lymphoma in Cats" discussion on "Conscious Cat" website:

http://consciouscat.net/2014/07/28/ly...


message 9: by Debbie "DJ" (new)

Debbie "DJ" Wow Lilo, truly amazing!


message 10: by Lilo (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lilo Debbie "DJ" wrote: "Wow Lilo, truly amazing!"

Essiac tea really IS amazing, and the above book reads like a suspense story.

We presently have 4 cats on the tea--Orphan Annie (who remains symptom-free), 2 cats who had each a cancerous ear amputated (so that the cancer won't come back), and one 18-year old cat who has recently lost weight but could not be diagnosed with anything significant (for in case he might have a hidden cancer).

My husband and I also take Essiac tea off and on (for our chronic bladder problems and also for just in case).


message 11: by Fred (new)

Fred Forbes So how do you get the cats to drink the tea?


message 12: by Lilo (last edited Nov 27, 2017 11:12PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lilo Fred wrote: "So how do you get the cats to drink the tea?"

Hi, Fred! Long time no see. Nice to hear from you. To answer your question:

My husband puts the tea into a syringe (without a needle), places the cat either on his lap or on the floor, secures the cat by holding it by the ruff (without lifting the cat up), and then, squeezes the tea diagonally into the cat's mouth. (If you squeeze it straight into the throat, the cat might choke. If you put it side-ways straight, the tea will land on the other side, outside of the cat's mouth.) Some cats give no trouble at all, most give a little trouble, and some, unfortunately, will spit, scratch, and bite.

Oh, I forgot to add. This administering of the tea, quite often, involves crawling under furniture because the cats don't line up waiting to get the tea administered. :-) This is why my husband does it; I'd have considerable trouble because I have a bad back.

We really have had miracle cures with this tea. Three for sure, several more probably. With these latter cases, the cancer diagnosis had not been firm.

If--heaven forbid!--my husband or I were struck with cancer, we would have the necessary surgery but would probably (depending on the type of cancer) forego mainstream treatment and put all our hopes on Essiac tea.

P.S. My husband just came in and said I should add the following: Treating our cancer-stricken (as well as supposedly cancer-stricken) cats for years, my husband found that it is a good idea to start with a smaller dosage to get the cats used to the taste of the tea. My husband also avoids giving the cats any sediments of the tea as they tend to choke on the sediments.--My husband usually drinks the leftover of the tea with the sediments himself, as I don't like the sediments either. However, the sediments probably contain a lot of the effective ingredients. There is this story of an old cancer-stricken dog who ate the sediments (of a not-pulverized tea) from the compost pound and got well again.


message 13: by Fred (new)

Fred Forbes Tip of the hat to both of you! Feeding purr persons their medicine is never easy!


message 14: by Lilo (last edited Nov 28, 2017 10:50AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lilo Fred wrote: "Tip of the hat to both of you! Feeding purr persons their medicine is never easy!"

Some never give any trouble. Unfortunately, they are the minority. We had one cat assumed to have cancer who was impossible to get the tea into. (Every time we tried, he exploded like a stick of dynamite.) He died.--And one of our two favorite cats (who fortunately has no signs of cancer) will neither scratch nor bite but wiggles like a worm and has been successful all her life evading oral medication. The few times she needed an antibiotic, we had to take her to the vet, who gave her a shot that would last for 2 weeks.

Hope your two beloved kitties are well.


message 15: by Fred (new)

Fred Forbes Actually, up to three. Lady across the street passed away in her garden one night. (We had gone to dinner. She was found by one of our park walkers and taken away and it was days before we found out.) At any rate, she had enraged park management by feeding 3 feral cats in addition to two she had in the house. She did have them neutered. We were able to take "Fritz" and exceed our 2 pet limit as long as we converted him to an indoor cat. Still take him out for a half hour a day to chase birds and lizards (latter he catches now and then, former never) and chomp on some grass but he still tries to head out the door when he can and sometimes heads over to his old place to see what is going on. Pretty destructive in his attempts to open doors but overall, pretty fearless and lovable. Neighbor took one, her kids took two and one was very ill and put down.


message 16: by Lilo (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lilo Fred wrote: "Actually, up to three. Lady across the street passed away in her garden one night. (We had gone to dinner. She was found by one of our park walkers and taken away and it was days before we found ou..."

Well, congratulations to the addition to your family! I am glad all the orphaned kitties found new homes and the very ill one was put out of its misery.

So there is an ordinance where you live that limits indoor/outdoor cats to 2 per family? Here in Vernal city, the limit is 4 cats (with ample opportunities to cheat :-)), and they don't distinguish between indoor- and outdoor-cats. But we live in the county, 10 miles out of town. There is no limit for cats (but larger amounts of dogs require a kennel license). However, we border BLM, and some busybody BLM civil servants could give us trouble because our cats venture over the property line, yet fortunately, this, so far, has not happened.


message 17: by Fred (new)

Fred Forbes Sun Key Village is a retirement community where we own the home and rent the lot so management calls the shots. Almost a deal breaker for us since when we moved in we had 2 dogs and 2 cats. Since they combined were less than the 40 pound, 2 pet limit they let us in with the proviso that once the animals pass we would not exceed the limit. They also let us take in Fritz since they felt that was better than having the strays roaming the neighborhood.


message 18: by Lilo (last edited Nov 29, 2017 12:20AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lilo Fred wrote: "Sun Key Village is a retirement community where we own the home and rent the lot so management calls the shots. Almost a deal breaker for us since when we moved in we had 2 dogs and 2 cats. Since t..."

My oh my! Now they count pets by the pound. Don't tell your cats, or they'll feel badly insulted.

Aren't you too young for a retirement community? At 71, you are still a spring chicken. I just turned 78 (my husband will be 75 in January), and we wouldn't be caught dead in a retirement community.

Well, I am kidding. We love the freedom of our 18-acre country property and the wonderful surroundings, but to be honest, we no longer cope. We are dependent on hired help, as there is no way we could do all the work ourselves (especially, because I can only do very little physical work due to all my health issues, and also because we additionally own a few other properties). Our 23-year story of hired help is an ongoing fiasco.


message 19: by Fred (new)

Fred Forbes Thought I was too young when we moved in at 55, but enjoy the people and the lifestyle.


message 20: by Lilo (last edited Nov 29, 2017 11:27AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lilo Fred wrote: "Thought I was too young when we moved in at 55, but enjoy the people and the lifestyle."

I am glad you like it where you live.

I can, more or less, adjust to any surroundings, but my husband, who grew up on a farm and who is a loner, does not feel at home with neighbors too close by. Besides, he would get in trouble in a subdivision (and even more so in a community with a home-owner association) because he is a messy hoarder. (He gets in trouble with me too for that matter. :-))


message 21: by [deleted user] (new)

Hi Lilo. It was good to get an update on your cats and I still want to read this book! Orphan Annie sounds like an impressive (and expensive!) cat. Glad she is doing so well. I think she would make a great book!

BTW, I recently read a new book by Peter Gethers, the father of Norton the Scottish Fold cat. I liked it very much; it was about his mother who lived to 93, and enjoyed her life to the end, despite having FOUR different types of cancer over the years and two strokes. Some Goodreads people didn't like Peter's ego, but I like the man--he makes me laugh. I think you would enjoy the book: My Mother's Kitchen: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, and the Meaning of Life. (He's still with his girfriend Janis, which did amaze me but also made me happy. I always liked Janis.)


message 22: by Lilo (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lilo Hi, Sarah. Orphan Annie is, indeed, an impressive and expensive cat.

Actually, my next writing project is a non-fiction narrative tale, titled "The Cats of Happy Cats Ranch". However, I won't write a word of it before my existing 3 books (2 memoirs and a novella) are not published.

(My husband had talked me into self-publishing, 10 years ago, promising to take care of all the technical and digital stuff. But every time he got started, some real-life calamity happened, he had to interrupt, and then, he had forgotten everything and he had to start again from scratch.)

Presently, there is no chance for my books getting published, because we are terribly busy organizing the renovation of an old house in a rather wildfire-safe area on the other side of town. We live in a beautiful but very wildfire-endangered canyon. Last year, there were 3 wildfires near Happy Cats Ranch, and the 3rd resulted in a mandatory evacuation. We luckily had a vacant property in town (where there are actually only 4 pets allowed), and we stayed there for 3 months. Yet I don't want to have to run from wildfire again with a whole menagerie (at the time, 15 cats, 2 dogs, and 8 chickens), with only 1/2 hour to get out.

Thank you for the book recommendation. I like Peter Gether's writing style. I read his trilogy that started with the book "The Cat Who Went to Paris". I put "My Mother's Kitchen" on my TBR list and gave it a priority marker. (Nice to hear that he is still with his girlfriend Janis. I also always liked her.)

Hope you have been doing well since I last heard from you.


message 23: by [deleted user] (new)

Lilo wrote: "Hi, Sarah. Orphan Annie is, indeed, an impressive and expensive cat.

Actually, my next writing project is a non-fiction narrative tale, titled "The Cats of Happy Cats Ranch". However, I won't writ..."


Yes, I am doing well and I'm going to order this Essiac book from my local bookstore. I use the formula on and off. You've certainly had wonderful results with your cats.

I hope the wildfires stay away. I would love to read "The Cats of Happy Cats Ranch," should you ever get the opportunity to write it!


message 24: by Lilo (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lilo Sarah wrote: "Lilo wrote: "Hi, Sarah. Orphan Annie is, indeed, an impressive and expensive cat.

Actually, my next writing project is a non-fiction narrative tale, titled "The Cats of Happy Cats Ranch". However,..."


I am so glad to hear that you are doing well. I'll guarantee that you will enjoy reading "The Essiac Report". It reads like a suspense story.

And thank you for your interest in my book that might never get written. :-) Seriously, I would really love to write this book. And I am sure that it would be interesting for cat lovers. But it doesn't make any sense to write any more before my existing books are published. (The main problem is inserting photographs into the e-book version of my early-childhood memoir, which I would like to publish before publishing the other 2 books.)


message 25: by Diana (new) - added it

Diana I have a cat that was diagnosed yesterday with breast cancer. I went online and purchased the essiac immediately and two amber bottles to store the tea in and then reading a book online I read that using it for breast cancer did not help and made it worse? I am so scared right now to use it. Any advice or other information on breast cancer and essiac tea?


message 26: by Lilo (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lilo Diana wrote: "I have a cat that was diagnosed yesterday with breast cancer. I went online and purchased the essiac immediately and two amber bottles to store the tea in and then reading a book online I read that..."

So sorry to hear that you got such a terrifying diagnosis for your cat.

From all I have experienced myself and read about Essiac tea, I consider it impossible that the tea might make anyone (human or animal) worse. Mind you, it may not perform miracles in each and every case, but, in my opinion, it cannot possibly harm.

If I were you, I would use Essiac tea. It has performed miracles on humans (and even more so) on animals.

Please keep us updated on your cat. With best wishes to you and your cat,

Lilo with all the (presently) 17 cats of Happy Cats Ranch

P.S. At this time, we have Hyaene (German for "hyena") on Essiac tea. She is 19 years old, and has a (probably cancerous) tumor on her gall duct. Hyena has been doing well, so far, but at age 19, she is a bit frail.--Orphan Annie (mentioned in my review), on the other hand, who is meanwhile almost 17 years old, is still being mistaken for a kitten and is (despite her previous cancer that had spread to her bones) our best jumper.


message 27: by Lilo (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lilo Diana wrote: "I have a cat that was diagnosed yesterday with breast cancer. I went online and purchased the essiac immediately and two amber bottles to store the tea in and then reading a book online I read that..."

How is your cat doing now?


message 28: by Lilo (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lilo Update:

Our Orphan Annie is unchanged, that is, healthy and happy and, quite often, mistaken for a mischievous kitten.

Our Hyaene almost died, in July/August, from a horrific respiratory infection (had caught cold when going missing for 4 days) but recovered when being administered a second antibiotic AND Essiac tea again. She is now "as good as new". We have no idea whether it was the second antibiotic alone that saved her, or whether the Essiac tea (which we now keep her on permanently) had anything to do with it.


message 29: by Marie (new)

Marie Copeland Alexander Lilo wrote: "Debbie "DJ" wrote: "Wow Lilo, truly amazing!"

Essiac tea really IS amazing, and the above book reads like a suspense story.

We presently have 4 cats on the tea--Orphan Annie (who remains symptom-..."


How do you administer the tea to them?


message 30: by Lilo (last edited Jan 22, 2020 12:23PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lilo @ Marie:

(1) You place the cat on your lap, hold it by the ruff, and raise the cat very lightly, just to the point that the front legs no longer support the cat. (2) Then, with your other hand, squirt the tea, with a syringe WITHOUT A NEEDLE, diagonally into the cat's mouth. If you aim right to the throat, the cat is likely to choke. If you aim sideways, the tea will come right out on the other side of the cat's mouth.

If you have a person to assist you, let this person do the (1).

Some cats are very easy to medicate. Others aren't. Good luck with medicating your cat(s)! And best wishes for you and your cat(s)!


message 31: by Marie (new)

Marie Copeland Alexander Thank you for your speedy reply. I do have one more question. When you and your husband (or even your pets) used the tea did you experience side effects? I heard the vomiting can get pretty bad. The woman that replied from the site said not with her product because it is the original brand. I was diagnosed with stage 4 bladder cancer yesterday and I would like to use it!


message 32: by Lilo (last edited Jan 22, 2020 01:33PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lilo Marie wrote: "Thank you for your speedy reply. I do have one more question. When you and your husband (or even your pets) used the tea did you experience side effects? I heard the vomiting can get pretty bad. Th..."

OMG, Marie! I am so very sorry you had this frightening diagnosis.

To answer your new question: Neither me nor my husband nor any of our numerous cats we gave the Essiac tea (since 2011) have ever experienced any side effects.

As I mentioned before, we have used several suppliers for the tea, which all worked fine (and did not cause side effects), yet we found bulk-essiac-tea.com the best (that is, easiest to prepare with no residue and, thus, no loss of effective substances) and also the cheapest source (when purchased in 1-lb or 3-lb quantities.

I would also like to recommend to you the book "Outsmart your Cancer, by Tanya Harter Pierce. I haven't read this book yet but have browsed through it and found it very informative and scientific. (There are so many untrustworthy books about alternative treatments on the market that you have to be very careful. Over the years I have developed skills to tell the trustworthy books from the untrustworthy ones.)

Here is the link to this book: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3...


message 33: by Lilo (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lilo P.S. I don't know why, but my link to the bulk-essiac-tea does not work. You may have to fiddle a bit with the address for the website. Maybe exchange a dash for a dot or leave out a dash. I would do it for you, but I am just about to leave the house. My husband is already waiting.

Please let me know whether you found the website. If not, I'll figure out what's wrong when I'll be back from town. And also, please stay in touch with me.

Btw, please make sure you have necessary surgery. If it were me, I would have necessary surgery but replace any chemo or radiation with Essiac tea.


message 34: by Lilo (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lilo P.P.S. Over the years, we have treated more cats than mentioned above with Essiac tea, and they are still alive or eventually died of old age, not of cancer. However, their cancer diagnosis had not been confirmed, as MRIs and colonoscopies are not available for animals (at least, not in our area). (We had 2 cats who were impossible to administer any medication to orally, as they went into outright life-or-death attack mode when we tried. Both of them died.)


message 35: by Lilo (new) - rated it 5 stars

Lilo P.P.P.S: Make sure you read the above book. It will give you hope. Many people with stage 4 cancer have survived with Essiac tea.


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