Cold War Conversations Podcast's Reviews > Far Away

Far Away by Victoria    Blake
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bookshelves: fiction, world-war-2-western-front

What do you really know about your parents past?

In this excellent World War 2 tale Victoria Blake has put together a moving and powerful story of friendship, survival and parents. It is beautifully written.


Initially set in an Italian prison camp in the summer of 1942, Michael and Harry, two men from very different backgrounds meet. Bored by months and years of captivity, one of them suggests that they write side by side in the same notebooks.

One produces an autobiographical account of his war but the other writes a fairytale about an orphan girl raised by crows.

Many years later, Michael’s son stumbles across his dead father's wartime notebooks which leads to him to learning much more about his father and Harry.

Far Away portrays a well researched and compelling view into the lives of POWs in Italy, but more than that it asks many questions about friendship and family.

I'm sure this book will appeal to fans of World War 2 fiction and particularly all those who left it too late to ask their fathers what really happened to them during World War 2.

I received this book for free from ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.
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Reading Progress

August 10, 2015 – Started Reading
August 10, 2015 – Shelved
August 10, 2015 – Shelved as: to-read
August 11, 2015 –
23.0%
August 13, 2015 –
77.0%
August 14, 2015 – Shelved as: fiction
August 14, 2015 – Shelved as: world-war-2-western-front
August 14, 2015 – Finished Reading

Comments Showing 1-1 of 1 (1 new)

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message 1: by Francesca (new)

Francesca Howard I am half way through this thrilling tale and the detailed description of life as a POW and the way the prisoners constructed a working society is riveting.


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