Lois Bujold's Reviews > A Man of Some Repute

A Man of Some Repute by Elizabeth Edmondson
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really liked it
Recommended to Lois by: random encounter on Amazon while looking at something else
Recommended for: readers enjoying British cozies

I was actually seduced by the cover, which made it look like something that would suit my mood -- which it did, so, good accurate cover design, somebody.

I enjoyed it, reading it in one long evening on my Kindle, but the writing wasn't exactly Dorothy Sayers-level. The author wrangled a large cast of characters through the use of third-person multiple viewpoint, but her net went more wide than deep. I wanted more interiority, more interesting thoughts and opinions, more telling detail. I'd call the prose, hm, workmanlike? It got the job done, and was perhaps appropriate for all those stiff-upper-lip Brits in the cast, but was short on lagniappe. Ending felt contrived to make a messy situation go away without our heroes having to do anything morally questionable to make it do so.

It is rather strange to see times within my own lifetime (though just barely, in this instance) now treated as grist for historical fiction.

Ta, L.
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Reading Progress

Started Reading
July 1, 2015 – Finished Reading
July 25, 2015 – Shelved

Comments Showing 1-8 of 8 (8 new)

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message 1: by Christina (new)

Christina You did not just call yourself old, or shall we say vintage, did you? I probably won't read this book, but your review made me laugh. I am a great fan, Ms. Bujold. I will never think of you as vintage. You are a classic! And, yes, I am done brown nosing!


message 2: by Celtic (new)

Celtic Sorry, but what does "short on lagniappe" mean? It's not a word I've heard before and the definition doesn't quite make sense in this context. I should say, having read all your books, that this is the first time I can remember not understanding something you've written ... which is intended as a compliment, rather than a complaint!


Lois Bujold Celtic wrote: "Sorry, but what does "short on lagniappe" mean? It's not a word I've heard before and the definition doesn't quite make sense in this context. I should say, having read all your books, that this is..."


Extras, given for free, like the 13th doughnut in a dozen; in this context, meant to imply those subtle delights of language, thought, perception, and insight which, while not strictly necessary to gain a picture of what's going on, nonetheless deepen it. "Voice" might be another slice on it.

The use of the word here might be a consequence of dashing off brief reviews some hours after I should have gone to bed, but I can't offhand think of a proper literary term that captures what I mean.

Ta, L.


message 4: by Sue (new)

Sue Agree -- somewhat mindbending to realize that times we lived are now treated as historical fiction...and then there are the "antique" cars with QQ license plates, that we remember going on dates it....

Sue


message 5: by Robbi (new)

Robbi Holman I'm just chuffed u out used the word "Iineriority" in a sentence that wasn't written by Theresa Rebeck.


Lois Bujold Robbi wrote: "I'm just chuffed u out used the word "Iineriority" in a sentence that wasn't written by Theresa Rebeck."

I think it's an inelegant word, but I haven't yet found a better, more succinct one. "Depth of characterization" is three words, and not quite the same thing anyway. Ditto "voice". It's a recognizable Thing; there must be a word or term for it. One would think.

That sense of being inside another's head, and finding the scenery really interesting.

Ta, L.


skye i might get it it looks good(:


message 8: by Mary (new)

Mary Read this far too many years ago to write a review. I think there was also a movie made, but don't remember much of that either.


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