Stewart McFarlane's Reviews > Alzheimer's Disease: What If There Was a Cure?

Alzheimer's Disease by Mary T. Newport
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it was amazing

This is an important book.
Mary T Newport "Alzheimer's Disease: What If There Was a Cure?”

Mary Newport is an MD (neonatal care practitioner), whose husband Steve was diagnosed with alzheimer’s aged 58 in 2003.
The underlying biochemistry behind her advocacy of Virgin Coconut Oil as the best means of delivering ketones, is clear and well supported scientifically. It is clearer and more credible than the “scientific” explanations behind the Memory Healer Program; though the wholefood diet she advocates is almost exactly the diet which the Memory Healer Program provides. This is mainly wholefoods, with raw salads & veg as a priority, some protein, and as few sugars & carbohydrates and as little processed or refined food as possible.
This is why that diet, with the addition of daily intake of Coconut Oil, is working so well for my Mum.

Basically what happens in Alzheimer’s, other forms of dementia & Parkinson’s Disease, is that the glucose (from carbohydrates) which is the normal fuel for the brain cells, (and all the cells in the body), can no longer get across the blood-brain barrier, so the brain cells are deprived and start to die. Hence the MRI Brain scans of advanced Alzheimer’s sufferers show brain shrinkage, and areas of destruction of brain cells, as well as the plaques & tangles associated with the brain being starved of fuel. The reason for the failure of the transport of fuel (glucose) to the brain, is lack of insulin or a resistance to insulin in the mitochondria in the brain cells. The brain requires massive supplies of energy to continue to function properly. The tiny mitochondria in the brain cells normally process this energy.
The body has a natural way of dealing with this problem on a temporary basis, by producing ketones, which seems to be a fuel which can pass through the blood brain barrier without needing the insulin transporter, and therefore fuel the brain cells. Normally we only produce ketones when we are starved for 48 hours or more. As soon as we eat again, the ketones levels drop and we go back to processing carbs to make glucose, with the insulin produced in the pancreas to transport the glucose. But where the latter process is not happening, as in Az sufferers, then ketones which the body can quickly synthesise from Virgin Unrefined Coconut Oil, come to the rescue, and allow the brain cells to be fuelled, and new cells to grow and replace the dead or damaged ones.
The best available source of ketones is Virgin Unrefined Coconut Oil and other Coconut based products, as well as MCT Oils from palm oil or coconut oil, or synthesized forms of these powerful fatty acids. Coconut Oil is a medium chain fatty acid (ie MCT), and it is a saturated fat, but it will not raise LDL cholesterol levels, and is not harmful to the diet. In fact, it has other great benefits in addition to supplying the ketones needed for Alzheimer’s sufferers. It has anti-oxidants, vitamins, fights infections, especially fungal problems, and herpes simplex problems and it boosts the immune system. It is good for the skin and hair; and is an excellent preventative health supplement.
Because the effects of Ketones are short term, they must be replaced daily to ensure the brain cells are being fuelled. Hence the need to take the Coconut oil every day. Mary Newport incorporated moderate doses into Steve’s meals, 3 times a day. He showed remarkable improvements, and only had setbacks when other illnesses or meds taken for them, prevented the taking of, or absorption of the ketones in the coconut oil.
This does mean that the subtitle of her book is rather misleading, because there is no permanent cure for Alzheimer’s. If you stop producing the ketones ie stop taking the coconut oil, then you deteriorate again, as your brain is not being fuelled properly. But we can say that the symptoms can be arrested, and the sufferer can lead a fairly normal life.
Here is a passage from the publisher’s blurb, which is not very clear, but it does get some of the background to the Newport’s story across…..

This is an this updated second edition Dr. Newport, a neonatal practitioner, continues the story of Steve's progress and provides the most recent research on such topics as possible causes of Alzheimer's due to the herpes simplex virus and nitrosamine substances and how infection, inflammation and genetic makeup may affect an individual's response to fatty acid therapy. Among many other updates, she details the latest clinical trials aimed at removing beta amyloid that accumulates in the Alzheimer's brain.
Dr. Newport's story of Steve's reprieve from Alzheimer's provides a real breakthrough for carers eager to learn about readily available fatty acids in foods that may reverse the ravages of this dreaded disease. Changes in loved ones may take many forms, including improved memory, return of personality, resumption of activities and social interaction and relief from certain physical symptoms.
Carers of those who suffer from Alzheimer's disease are searching desperately for hope, relief and a cure. They will find all that in this book that summaries Dr. Newport's research and Steve's reprieve, the importance of medium-chain fatty acids and how Alzheimer's patients can make the transition to a healthy diet rich in these vital fats
Dr. Newport has become an ardent advocate for ketone ester research, with FDA approval her final goal.

These are my (Stewart McFarlane) further COMMENTS for this review
I have been giving virgin coconut oil capsules & paste/oil daily in food for 5 weeks to Mum. Her short term memory & verbal accuracy have improved, as well her joints, skin, appetite & mood. She is sleeping and eating well, and has had no dizzy spells since starting this regime.She is walking 90 minutes a day and is reading novels again in the evening, her bridge playing has improved.
I recently gave Mum 2 standard memory tests. Pretty much the same test as those used in her diagnosis. She scored 10/10 in one (ie the Clock Face Test) & 98% in the other (Standard Sage Test). So she would be declared clear of AZ’s if these were her first tests. She had been on coconut oil, beetroot juice and the Memory Healer Diet for 5 ½ weeks when she took these tests.
Mum's blood pressure has returned to normal, though this may be due to the organic beetroot juice she is taking daily, along with beetroot in salads & soups.
It is important to use virgin coconut oil, not the refined or processed stuff. The refined oil is no good as a food or supplement.
Don't store the coconut oil in fridge or cool places, as it gets very hard. Best mixed with warm foods just before eating, or warmed by placing the jar in a bowl of hot water, or on a warm hob or heater or even microwave for a second, so it can liquify, then you can even mix it with cold things such as yoghurt or ice cream.

The compulsion to eat chocolate, biscuits, ice cream & other sweet is common in Alzheimer's sufferers: because the brain is telling them it is starved of glucose (fuel) so they eat the sweet stuff to supply it, but it doesn't work because the glucose cannot fuel the brain cells because of the insulin deficit or insulin resistance, so the sweet stuff just gets turned to fat, rots the teeth, as well as supplying some energy to other parts of the body, but not much, often due insulin deficiency.

I have noticed that Mum's craving for those things has diminished, because the fuel to the brain is being supplied by the ketones from the Coconut Oil.

NOTE:
If you are starting yourself or a loved one on coconut oil, go easy to start with, it can cause diarrhoea if you take too much, too early. Build up gradually & you will have no problem. If you get the runs, reduce intake until your stomach adjusts.

Mum & I have had no problem, but we always liked coconut anyway.

Anyway, better to have the runs for short spell, than a permanently malfunctioning brain.

I should add that my general approach to my Mum's illness has been strongly influenced by the person centred care method advocated by the Contented Dementia (SPECAL) as advocated in Oliver James " Contented Dementia: 24-hour Wraparound Care for Lifelong Well-being"Contented Dementia[Kindle Edition]. The Contented Dementia Trust is based in Burford, Oxfordshire. Though they do not advocate any specific diets, as far as I know.
______________________________________________________________________________________________________
VIRGIN COCONUT OIL, restores memory & and helps mental functioning. Great for skin and hair; and protects against many infections and fungal rashes. Boosts the immune system & provides many other benefits. Mum doing very well on this.
As an alternative to the Suma brand, these 2 are good brands for spreads or adding to warm food or even with ice cream.
"Groovy Food" extra virgin organic coconut oil. £5.99 jar, or Waitrose own brand cold pressed virgin coconut oil (in a plastic tub)...£5.00. Amounts are about the same as Suma’s ie 320 grammes.
___________________________________________________
BEETROOT JUICE
“Beet It” Organic Beetroot Juice by James White Co. is on offer at Waitrose. 1 litre carton 2.20, 75cl Bootle..£2.39 (usually 2.99). This is the best brand.
Beetroot , especially the juice, is an essential part of Mum's Memory Diet, & known to regulate blood pressure,& has powerful antioxidants & vitamins. It is really working for Mum. One glass with a Memory healer meal, & sometimes another glass later in the day.
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message 1: by Travelin (last edited Jun 09, 2015 03:58AM) (new) - added it

Travelin Wow, a lot to consider. One wonders if it's ever too early to change one's diet. Do you follow this regimen? A strange study came out a few days ago claiming that people with type O blood may have structurally different brains less susceptible to Alzheimers somehow. It sounds too convoluted to even type and may suggest something about the blood-brain barrier if anything at all.

Terry Pratchett funded a study at Oxford which suggested that Vitamin A(?) slows down the onset of Alzheimers.


message 2: by Stewart (last edited Jun 12, 2015 02:55AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Stewart McFarlane I have followed the same regime as Mum for 6 weeks now. I am sure that prevention is better than cure, and that is never too soon to start on virgin coconut oil, and fruits, veg & wholefoods. My Mum's change has been dramatic in those 6 weeks. Before starting she was getting more confused, more memory lapses, some dizzy spells. All, despite her AZ medication & anti-depressants. She has none of these symptoms now. They started to vanish within days of starting on coconut & wholefood Memory Healer diet. My changes not so dramatic, but I do feel better.

I wish Terry Pratchett could have given the MCT Coconut oils & wholefood diet a chance, perhaps it would have helped him. In fact I am sure it would have. Obviously high achievers & intellectuals are very badly hit by it.
I am sure the Vit A and all the vitamins help, and the fruits, veg etc provide these. Not sure if Blood type is a factor, but I am no biologist, so who knows? Mum will continue with regime. My sisters and Mum's p/t carer will try to help. She knows how much it has helped her.
What I have noticed in researching all this; is how resistant big pharma & medics are to natural product solutions. Obviously they cannot make the same money as on the drugs, and people are quite capable of taking coconut oil, & flesh for themselves, as well as beets & juice, so the GP's lose their power as well as income via big pharma. More surprisingly is the fact that some AZ support & lobby groups are resistant too. They seem suspicious of natural solutions. They are often heavily involved with big pharma for funding , so maybe less of a surprise. In the USA, Mary Newport's battle with an AZ group, was a terrible indictment of their blinkered attitudes and censorship. That is covered in her book. The only question about Mum's diet ever raised by any GP in decades, is "does she drink much alcohol?" Despite the fact that to a considerable extent, we are what we eat. I speak to a few AZ professionals in UK who know nothing about diet and nutrition. It is staggering. Some don't even have a general lay knowledge of healthy eating. One standard pharma or medics response is, " Evidence is all based & anecdotal...benefits not proven, coconut products have not been subject to scientific trials &'tests". The reason is because these same bodies refused to test them...why? MONEY. It is not a new “wonder drug” made in their labs… No money to be made by big pharma in pressed coconut to get oil, when the pressing is done in the producer countries(usually 3rd world or developing). So they are not interested. So there is only one trial of coconut oil on AZ symptoms under way in Florida, none anywhere else in US or Europe. Guess who campaigned for it, with strong backing from senior Democrats? Mary Newport.


message 3: by Lilo (new) - added it

Lilo Thank you so much for sharing this amazing info, Stewart.

After reading a book about Virgin Coconut Oil, we had stocked up on the product. But then (in Nov. 2011), my husband and I got tested for allergies, and my husband tested positive for coconuts (and rice, and corn, and bananas, and, and, and ...). So he no longer wanted me to use coconut oil, and, and, and, and, and ...

I have reason to believe that these allergy test results are not valid. (This is because I also tested allergic to a number of substances I am fairly sure I am not allergic to.) My husband is definitely allergic to wheat (we knew this all along). And I definitely have multiple airborne allergies (only few showed on this recent test), but I doubt all my positive results of food allergies.

(I have a theory why these allergy tests are not valid. With so many other things, it has to do with money.)

I'll start using Virgin Coconut Oil again immediately and will watch my husband for allergic reactions, which I bet won't appear.


I know about the misery of the pharma industry suppressing all natural cures. It also has suppressed Essiac Tea, a natural cancer remedy, for almost a century.

We achieved miracle cancer-cures with 3 of our cats. Two of these cats have metastasized cancer. They had been more dead than alive by August 2013. After receiving Essiac tea, they improved within hours and were symptom-free within 3 months. Every time they were off the tea (when we were out of town) or when the dosage was reduced to maintenance-level, they suffered relapses and improved again when back on the treatment-dosage of the tea. We, meanwhile, make sure that they always receive the tea in sufficient dosage.

One of these cats (with brain cancer spread to the bones) has been absolutely symptom-free since last summer, and she is full of mischief. The other (with a tumor on the larynx that has spread to other parts of the head) has not fully recovered from the last relapse of last summer but has regained vision again and is still out and about. A third cancer-cat (with a large tumor in her belly, diagnosed in Sept. 2013) had remained symptom-free all along (tolerated even interruptions of the tea), but died of old age, a few weeks ago. (She was 20+ years old.) A 4th cancer-cat could not be saved with Essiac Tea. (She suffered from abdominal lymphoma, which hardly ever responds to any treatment.) Yet we think that 3 success-stories out of 4 cases is a statistic mainstream medicine has still to match.

For anyone who is interested in Essiac Tea: There are several books about the tea on Amazon. And I'll be glad to provide more details about the miracle cures of our cats to anyone who sends me a private message.

Please note: The price for the tea varies quite a bit. One can pay $ 250.--/lb or one can buy it at about $ 28.--/lb. (We eventually found the cheapest source in the internet. We also consider it the best source; it is in pulverized form, which is easier to prepare and doesn't lose any effective ingredients in the strainer.)

If--heaven forbid!--my husband or I were struck with cancer, we would have necessary surgery, but other than that, we would forego all standard treatment and rely on Essiac Tea (and some prayers).


message 4: by Lilo (new) - added it

Lilo P.S. Greetings and best wishes to your mom!


message 5: by Lilo (new) - added it

Lilo P.S. 2: I just bought the book.--We don't have Alzheimer's (yet), but why wait until we get it?


Stewart McFarlane Yes I think you're right. The allergy testing is part of the scam. Sure, many people will get diarrhea if they take too much coconut oil, too soon. Such people need to be weaned onto it gradually. But those reactions are quite rare. I know many people who were tested as children and said to allergic to all sort of stuff. Guess what, as soon as they went through puberty, the allergies vanished & they now follow ordinary diets. I attach reviews of an important review of the food industry, medical testing scam, dietary advice scam that the US govt & others have fallen for:This review is from: The Diet Delusion (Paperback) author: Gary Taubes
Amazon Kindle £9.49 or Pbk ? USA title on Amazon.com appears to be,”GOOD CALORIES,BAD CALORIES” same book.
I bought this book after reading a review in the British Medical Journal as the influence of diet on health is a subject of great interest to me. This book is not a light-weight journalistic book but a work of scholarship going in great detail into the background history as to how some supposed firm truths about, for example, the deleterious effects of dietary cholesterol have become entrenched despite much evidence to the contrary. The author has done a prodigious amount of work ferreting out research papers, interviewing scientists and presenting some of the complex biochemistry that underlies why some of the entrenched ideas are wrong from first principles. In the latter regard I've known for years that ingested cholesterol, say in eggs of prawns, will not increase circulating cholesterol because, as a biochemist, I know that blood cholesterol levels are controlled by a feed-back system so that synthesis in the liver is reduced if cholesterol is provided in the diet. What I didn't know was that data from the Framingham Heart Study, that didn't fit the received wisdom that cholesterol is bad news, has been buried, for example, that cholesterol levels in women over 50 years has no bearing at all on heart disease. Similarly, propaganda that saturated fat intake is linked to breast cancer is the reverse of the truth, and the repeatedly found inverse correlation between blood cholesterol level and risk of various cancers (in other words the lower cholesterol level the higher the risk of cancer) has been constructively ignored because the scientists doing the research were so convinced that saturated fat and cholesterol were the culprits in the search for a causative factor in heart disease. Yet time and time again when research has been done where similar populations are studied (i.e. not comparing different countries) the results find little or no association. As a medical research scientist myself I know that one has to avoid becoming so attached to beliefs that research is done to prove that one is right rather than what should be the case to test to the limit that the belief is wrong.

I suppose it's because dietary fat has the same name as the thing that pads out our adipose tissue that it's popularly assumed that it's the fat in the diet that makes us fat, whereas all food is potentially laid down as fat in the tissues. Similarly because metabolic energy is generated from glucose it's assumed that carbs are what are needed for energy, but again that's not the case, protein, carbohydrates and fat are all energy sources. Athletes don't need to stock up on carbs for energy, their fat stores are there for that purpose.

The wealth of research linking insulin (and the triggering of insulin secretion by carbohydrates in the diet) to fat deposition is comprehensively and convincingly presented by the author is both unsurprising from first principles but it is shocking that it has been side-lined by the "fat is bad " brigade in the field of obesity and heart disease. Lay persons may wonder how false hypotheses can prevail but may not realize that important international conferences are overwhelmingly funded by pharmaceutical or food companies and the influential "thought-leaders" are often on retainers from these industries or at the very least the research is funded by the latter and support given to present their findings at conferences. "Thought-leaders" tend to be the editors of journals and thus wield power over what gets published. Also there's an inherent publication bias in favour of papers finding positive associations between factors because negative findings (i.e. reporting no association) are less likely to be published or secure further funding as there's no money to be made out of research that finds no benefit in to weight-reduction of manufactured low-fat foods; or questions the importance of cholesterol in the genesis of heart-disease in the vast majority of cases, then the wholesale prescribing of statins, to reduce cholesterol, one of the biggest money-spinners of all time would be under threat.

The author is to be commended for this monumental and thought-provoking book
_
This review is from: The Diet Delusion (Paperback)
I bought this book after reading a review in the British Medical Journal as the influence of diet on health is a subject of great interest to me. This book is not a light-weight journalistic book but a work of scholarship going in great detail into the background history as to how some supposed firm truths about, for example, the deleterious effects of dietary cholesterol have become entrenched despite much evidence to the contrary. The author has done a prodigious amount of work ferreting out research papers, interviewing scientists and presenting some of the complex biochemistry that underlies why some of the entrenched ideas are wrong from first principles. In the latter regard I've known for years that ingested cholesterol, say in eggs of prawns, will not increase circulating cholesterol because, as a biochemist, I know that blood cholesterol levels are controlled by a feed-back system so that synthesis in the liver is reduced if cholesterol is provided in the diet. What I didn't know was that data from the Framingham Heart Study, that didn't fit the received wisdom that cholesterol is bad news, has been buried, for example, that cholesterol levels in women over 50 years has no bearing at all on heart disease. Similarly, propaganda that saturated fat intake is linked to breast cancer is the reverse of the truth, and the repeatedly found inverse correlation between blood cholesterol level and risk of various cancers (in other words the lower cholesterol level the higher the risk of cancer) has been constructively ignored because the scientists doing the research were so convinced that saturated fat and cholesterol were the culprits in the search for a causative factor in heart disease. Yet time and time again when research has been done where similar populations are studied (i.e. not comparing different countries) the results find little or no association. As a medical research scientist myself I know that one has to avoid becoming so attached to beliefs that research is done to prove that one is right rather than what should be the case to test to the limit that the belief is wrong.

I suppose it's because dietary fat has the same name as the thing that pads out our adipose tissue that it's popularly assumed that it's the fat in the diet that makes us fat, whereas all food is potentially laid down as fat in the tissues. Similarly because metabolic energy is generated from glucose it's assumed that carbs are what are needed for energy, but again that's not the case, protein, carbohydrates and fat are all energy sources. Athletes don't need to stock up on carbs for energy, their fat stores are there for that purpose.

The wealth of research linking insulin (and the triggering of insulin secretion by carbohydrates in the diet) to fat deposition is comprehensively and convincingly presented by the author is both unsurprising from first principles but it is shocking that it has been side-lined by the "fat is bad " brigade in the field of obesity and heart disease. Lay persons may wonder how false hypotheses can prevail but may not realize that important international conferences are overwhelmingly funded by pharmaceutical or food companies and the influential "thought-leaders" are often on retainers from these industries or at the very least the research is funded by the latter and support given to present their findings at conferences. "Thought-leaders" tend to be the editors of journals and thus wield power over what gets published. Also there's an inherent publication bias in favour of papers finding positive associations between factors because negative findings (i.e. reporting no association) are less likely to be published or secure further funding as there's no money to be made out of research that finds no benefit in to weight-reduction of manufactured low-fat foods; or questions the importance of cholesterol in the genesis of heart-disease in the vast majority of cases, then the wholesale prescribing of statins, to reduce cholesterol, one of the biggest money-spinners of all time would be under threat.

The author is to be commended for this monumental and thought-provoking book.

The Science that Underlies the Accepted Diet Wisdom, 27 Feb. 2008
By
Boar Gules "Boar Gules" (The Hague, Holland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Diet Delusion: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom on Diet, Weight Loss and Disease (Hardcover)
Have you ever wondered about the advice on healthy eating we get?
First it was, Cholesterol is deadly, no eggs! Then it was, You only have to avoid the bad cholesterol. And finally it became, Actually, dietary cholesterol isn't really the problem: dietary fat is the problem.

First it was, margarine is healthier than butter. Then it was, Ermm, actually, guys, butter is healthier than margarine.

Have you ever wondered about the healthy diets we've been told to go on? The ones you've watched your overweight colleagues, friends or lover struggle with, to no avail? We all know they don't work. Even the authorities that recommend them admit they don't work.

Why is it that when the standard low-fat, restricted-calorie diets don't work -- and they almost never do --, it's politically incorrect to question the efficacy of the diet? It's always, the dieter is to blame; they lack willpower, they cheat, they're just plain lazy and gluttonous. And this, even when you can not lose weight on a diet that your lean friends would call meagre, and you're hungry and tired much of the day?

Have you ever wondered if the scientific foundation on which all these perpetually shifting and retreating and ineffective recommendations were made wasn't all that sound to begin with?

So, OK, I admit, I was already prepared to believe that there was something not quite right about the current dogma for low-fat diets with lots of exercise being the only way to lose weight. I followed this advice myself for much of my adult life, and, being fortunately lean, guess what? it worked, for me. But not for many other people. You might say I came to this book with an open mind.

I was not prepared for the revelations in this book. About how there are no large-scale epidemiological studies underlying the standard recommendations (and never will be because it would cost billions to do it properly). About how some of the science is not only dodgy but dreadful. About how some key recommendations rest on tiny studies. About how even the well-conducted studies support more than one hypothesis. About the large and well-conducted dietary studies that were quietly filed away because they failed to confirm earlier, smaller, less rigorous ones.

I urge you to read this book. It is not always easy going, because despite the author's narrative skill there is a lot of science to be explained. It is not a rant or a polemic, and so there is little rhetoric to get carried away by. ...Out of space, so I'll put the rest in another post (STEWART)


Stewart McFarlane MORE REVIEWS OF GARY TAUBES BOOK.It is very possible that the medical and public-health establishment will succeed in burying this book, just as they have succeeded in burying books with a similar message over the past 40 years. These books weren't perfect: they got sometimes important details of the science wrong (as we now understand it); just as there may be details of the science in Mr Taubes's book that in the future turn out to be wrong. Mr Taubes is a scientific journalist, not a scientist. He reports the science as it is known, he draws attention to where he consciously oversimplifies, and he quite clearly knows about the issues he writes about.

This book should earn him a doctorate: it is a masterful tour of a century-plus of science, and in its way as least as impressive as the PhD dissertations and journal articles he so clearly (and sometimes ruthlessly) describes.

I don't agree with another reviewer who says that this book ought to earn its author a Nobel prize. Nobel prizes are for new discoveries. Mr Taubes describes biochemistry that, however groundbreaking in its day, is no longer controversial: it's textbook stuff. Only problem is, it's texbook stuff for biochemists, and the public-health gurus haven't got around to reading it.

So, a Nobel prize, no. A Pulitzer prize, though: that's another matter entirely.

Please read this book, if you struggle with your weight. Once you've read it, you'll at least be able to make a rational decision about what body of diet dogma to believe.

Please read this book, if you don't struggle with your weight. It may help you to understand what someone you love, who is overweight, has to go through.

Especially please read this book if reviews have predisposed you to believe that it's wrong. Before you swallow the criticism, ask yourself if you believe the critics have studied the literature as deeply as Mr Taubes has.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Calories, Bad Calories, 4 May 2010
By
Kindle Customer (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)
This review is from: The Diet Delusion (Paperback)
This book did massively well in the US under its original title "Good Calories, Bad Calories", but for some perverse reason the publishers decided to rename it when it was launched here in the UK. Because of this all the word of mouth and momentum the book had built up in America was lost, and the book is fairly unknown in this country. This is not a 10 easy steps to losing weight book, although you will find Gary Taubes 10 easy steps amongst the 640 pages. This is a science book, detailing in a scientific way why we put on weight and why we fail to lose it. It's written by an excellent science journalist and so is easily accessible to all general readers. The only problem I have with this book is that it's really 2 books. If you have problems with cholesterol read the first half. If you want to lose weight, skip the first half and start the book half way through. This book is for everyone who has tried to lose weight and has failed.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful

This review is from: The Diet Delusion: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom on Diet, Weight Loss and Disease (Hardcover)
Thank you, Mr Taubes, for presenting a critical analysis of the evidence published so far, for although my own researches had drawn me to similar conclusions as your own, you have argued the case more eloquently, thoroughly, and accurately than I can.

The only distressing aspect about reading this book is that if one has to deal subsequently with so-called professionals and experts - such as my wife's 'diabetes team' - one discovers what Mr Taubes illustrates so well, namely that most of them appear to be blissfully ignorant of either the historical facts or the latest research.

I could write at some length extolling the value of this book, but other commentators have done the job for me. Apart from which, I doubt that I could find sufficient superlatives to do Mr Taubes justice.

Suffice to say, for anyone who is suffering from a chronic, life threatening disease, such as Type II diabetes, I cannot stress enough that reading this book will be of more benefit to you than the advice you are likely to receive from your medical team, since they are still pushing the high-carb, low fat and low-protein diet that they know simply does not work for over 95% of their patients. Any other so-called 'scientist' who persisted in performing the same unchanged experiment that had proved itself to have only a 5% success rate (with a better than 95% confidence limit), yet proclaimed that this was the 'answer' to the problem, would have his claims dismissed out of hand.

Take control of your life. Read this book so that you can defend yourself from the ignorance, prejudice and political bias you will undoubtedly encounter from the medical establishment when it comes to dealing with your diabetes and its complications. After all, it's not their life they are jeopardising, it's yours.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should be compulsory reading world-wide, 21 July 2009
By
Zoe V. Harcombe - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)
This review is from: The Diet Delusion (Paperback)
What a brilliant book! Incredibly well researched, well presented, well argued, persuasive. It does help that I already agree with the philosophy presented - the current obesity epidemic started at the same time that we changed our diet advice away from 'starches are fattening' to 'base your meals on starchy foods'. Every dietician should be forced to read this and then explain how they plan to change their current advice in the light of the evidence presented.

ONE CAUTION: You don't need both "The Diet Delusion" and "Good Calories Bad Calories". They are the same book - the first for the UK and the second for the US. Having said that, I don't mind having a spare of this ground breaking epic. Go Gary Go!
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lifechanging, 19 Sept. 2010
By
chloevienna (England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Diet Delusion (Paperback)
This book was a revelation to me. It is factually dense and took me longer than normal to read.

I have always felt that goverment policy with regard to food went against common sense, but I am a conventional person and found it hard to question conventional wisdom. This book sets out to investigate all the nutritional scientific studies made in the last 150 years. It becomes apparent that the basis for the US Government's food policy on fat and carbohydrates lacks rigour. It is influenced by one charismatic man and his disciples and is factually incorrect. In parallel the book discusses human nutritional requirements that are actually supported by numerous scientific nutritional studies.

I recommend it to anyone who cares about their health and refuses to kowtow to the food industry.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, 4 Sept. 2010
By
catriona hunter (uk) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Diet Delusion (Paperback)
This is the best piece of research I have read since leaving university and I work in the field.
Beautifully and timeconsumingly researched over several years, this is an extremely comprehensive and well thought through selection overwritten to provide an extremely good read. I was unable to put it down for the 10 hours it took to skim it, and I am still working through the material at the moment.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Please read this book!, 4 Feb. 2010
By
Mr. G. Clarke (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)
This review is from: The Diet Delusion (Paperback)
This is the first time I have gone to the trouble to review a book or film online. The reason is that I want to recommend that you read this book. I bought it about 4 months ago and read it right through. I then started putting into practice what I learned from it and kept referring to it on a daily basis. I have just finished re-reading it all and I have got much more out of it a second time.
This is to me a very important piece of work. I regard it as one of the very best books I've read. Gary Taubes is to be praised for his effort in researching and writing it. Like all knowledge it is only "right" until a better explanation comes along, but if you are confused by all the conflicting rubbish talked about nutrition and diet, you should read this. In fact if you want to see how official bodies handle messages of a "scientific" nature you should read this. Parallels with climate change "science" come to mind.
Incidentally, although I wouldn't usually publicise personal information I will tell you that when I got the book I was eight pounds into overweight territory. By following the explanations in the book I understand how to control weight and appetite. I lost the eight pounds in the first 4 weeks so am now classed as just at the top of the normal weight range and am aiming to reduce by another five pounds or so. Before I took this action I was suffering from heartburn and wind (!) and was beginning to think I had a slight digestive problem. All that has gone and I now feel very well. Highly recommended!
By
gayesmith1@aol.com "gayesmith1@aol.com" (USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Diet Delusion (Paperback)
Gary Taubes seems to have hit the nail on the diet head! This man is probably not well liked among those who fancy themselves as 'diet gurus' because he tells the truth which is the opposite of what nonsense they are peddling. Get this book if you want to know how the body really deals with food, carbs in particular, but especially sugar and how eating a certain way will make you healthy again! Read this book and learn the truth about what will make you healthy again!
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30 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A heroic book, 8 Jan. 2008
By
A. Turner - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Diet Delusion: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom on Diet, Weight Loss and Disease (Hardcover)
I read this book from cover to cover in one go. A staggering amount of work and research went into it, and it is a very comprehensive account of research, ideas and dogma related to health and obesity over the last century. It is a shame that many of the people involved did/do not have the same appreciation of what constitutes real science as Gary Taubes does.


Stewart McFarlane (REAL NAME)
This review is from: The Diet Delusion (Paperback)
This is the first time I have gone to the trouble to review a book or film online. The reason is that I want to recommend that you read this book. I bought it about 4 months ago and read it right through. I then started putting into practice what I learned from it and kept referring to it on a daily basis. I have just finished re-reading it all and I have got much more out of it a second time.
This is to me a very important piece of work. I regard it as one of the very best books I've read. Gary Taubes is to be praised for his effort in researching and writing it. Like all knowledge it is only "right" until a better explanation comes along, but if you are confused by all the conflicting rubbish talked about nutrition and diet, you should read this. In fact if you want to see how official bodies handle messages of a "scientific" nature you should read this. Parallels with climate change "science" come to mind.
Incidentally, although I wouldn't usually publicise personal information I will tell you that when I got the book I was eight pounds into overweight territory. By following the explanations in the book I understand how to control weight and appetite. I lost the eight pounds in the first 4 weeks so am now classed as just at the top of the normal weight range and am aiming to reduce by another five pounds or so. Before I took this action I was suffering from heartburn and wind (!) and was beginning to think I had a slight digestive problem. All that has gone and I now feel very well. Highly recommended!
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This guy is incredible! Finally the truth about what really makes us fat and its not what you've been told!, 9 Mar. 2010
By
gayesmith1@aol.com "gayesmith1@aol.com" (USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Diet Delusion (Paperback)
Gary Taubes seems to have hit the nail on the diet head! This man is probably not well liked among those who fancy themselves as 'diet gurus' because he tells the truth which is the opposite of what nonsense they are peddling. Get this book if you want to know how the body really deals with food, carbs in particular, but especially sugar and how eating a certain way will make you healthy again! Read this book and learn the truth about what will make you healthy again!
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30 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A heroic book, 8 Jan. 2008
By
A. Turner - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Diet Delusion: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom on Diet, Weight Loss and Disease (Hardcover)
I read this book from cover to cover in one go. A staggering amount of work and research went into it, and it is a very comprehensive account of research, ideas and dogma related to health and obesity over the last century. It is a shame that many of the people involved did/do not have the same appreciation of what constitutes real science as Gary Taubes does. As a scientist myself I am horrified by the levels of arrogance, incompetence, dishonesty and fraud documented in this history.
It should be mandatory for every health profession to read it.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Scary stuff, 7 Feb. 2011
By
Floray - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Diet Delusion (Paperback)
This book is very worrying - the author has obviously done his research (impressive list of notes and bibliography at the back of it)and the basic message I got from it was - never believe what anyone tells you. Taubes cites innumerable researches that have since been proved inconclusive or just plain wrong but have got into the public mindset and now are accepted as gospel. As always, the people in power want to be able to tell the people 'underneath' them what to do and can't bear, or can't afford, to admit when they are wrong or just unsure. It's not an easy read - I often found myself backtracking to go through some paragraphs again - but it is enlightening and informative. Now I want to get hold of many of the references he cites to see for myself! Recommended if you are wanting to find out the truth about diet and health. Taubes doesn't tell you what to do but he does present the evidence for you to make up your own mind.


Stewart McFarlane Sorry, It took a few boxes to get the best reviews of Taubes book in. Mum continues to improve. I leave for Thailand on 27 June. I am worried in case she stops taking the coconut oil and following the whole food diet; so her part time care is briefed , along with Mum's support network, so hopefully she will keep it up.

We see her Doctor this morning, as I want her re tested for AZ, and to see which meds we can take her off. I am expecting some nonsense from the GP. so it goes


message 10: by Travelin (last edited Jun 15, 2015 11:55AM) (new) - added it

Travelin The case against avoiding most ingested cholesterol appears to have finally reached officials (first link).

The second link is a diet to prevent Alzheimer's.

http://www.webmd.com/diet/20150226/fo...

http://www.webmd.com/alzheimers/featu...


message 11: by Lilo (last edited Jun 15, 2015 11:52AM) (new) - added it

Lilo @ Stewart:

Thank you so very much for all your info. I was already aware of some of the food scams (margarine, eggs, etc.) but am, certainly, not aware of all of them.

For the moment, I only had time to glance over all your info. (We have a vet appointment for 5 cats this afternoon, we have to predator-proof the chicken coop and enclosure of our newly acquired 8 chicks, and we have a number of other urgent matters to attend to before I get more involved in diet issues, which are definitely very important.)

I don't want to spread any unfounded rumors, but one thought upfront:

Imagine you were the CEO of a company that made money with allergy testing and allergy desensitization. Imagine further you were ruthless and didn't mind to run a scam. Might you not get the idea to mix harmless table salt into testing substances (possibly at random) to produce skin reactions and convince people that they are allergic to a multitude of substances, for which they needed desensitization? I mean, this is just a thought.

I do trust the allergy tests that were performed in Toronto, in the 1960s, by my allergy specialist doctor, namely Dr. Norman Epstein (at the time, called "The Allergy Pope of America"). I had tested positive to a multitude of airborne substances and only 2 food substances. Dr. Epstein had pointed out that testing for food allergies with scratch tests was very unreliable, and so it turned out. The 2 foods I had tested allergic to never gave me any problems. These new, rather questionable, test results (of 2011) showed allergies to several foods I also had never had any problems with, from what I can tell.

In order to reliably find out about food allergies, one has to avoid the suspected food (one at a time) for 2 weeks, then eat lots of it for the next 2 weeks, and then repeat for another 2+2 weeks, all this time keeping a diary with hourly recordings of possible other influences (positive and negative [such as other foods eaten, work, leisure, stress, weather, etc.]) and also of physical and psychological symptoms. This is a rather time-taking procedure but really the only way to go. (Yet absolutely NOT advised for potentially live-endangering allergies, such as allergies to nuts, peanuts, and shellfish.)

I spent 4 months with this time-taking procedure, in 2012, testing my husband for these 2011 test results I had (and still have) no confidence in, keeping interviewing my husband and doing all the recording for him, only to find out after 4 months that my dear, sweet husband had taken an antihistamine all along, making all this testing and record-keeping worthless. (We haven't had time since to repeat this testing and record-keeping.)


message 12: by Lilo (new) - added it

Lilo @ Travelin: Thank you for the link to these articles. I'll read them as soon as I can squeeze time.


message 13: by Travelin (new) - added it

Travelin Lilo wrote: "@ Travelin: Thank you for the link to these articles. I'll read them as soon as I can squeeze time."

"One study showed that people who stuck to the MIND diet lowered their risk of Alzheimer’s disease by 54%."

If it's true, your cats will thank you later.


Stewart McFarlane Thanks Travelin. I read through the Mind Diet and other details. It certainly is a healthy diet and very similar to that of the Memory Healer Program. What is missing from both is the virgin coconut oil, which I think has powerful evidence behind in the seversing of AZ & other brain problem symptoms.
And many other health benefits & it certainly is good for pets.

I haven't looked at the other diet stuff you sent yet as I am buried in Gary Taubes book and preparing Mum for my departure.


~☆~Autumn♥♥ Stewart wrote: "Yes I think you're right. The allergy testing is part of the scam. Sure, many people will get diarrhea if they take too much coconut oil, too soon. Such people need to be weaned onto it gradually. ..."

I have severe food allergies as an adult and the RAST test was life saving for me as orange juice was killing me. Some of it is strange as my IgA blood work which said that squash is deadly for me. I get asthma and migraine. Believe me if you have asthma you need to know about your food allergies.

I have started using coconut oil since my parents both had an Alzheimers diagnosis.


message 16: by Lilo (last edited Oct 06, 2017 09:31PM) (new) - added it

Lilo Mary wrote: "mom lives with me and has an Alzheimer's disease for about 8 years now. Her body is healthy but she has almost no speech, is pretty much always confused, sleeps most of the day away, is incontinent..."

Thank you for sharing the info about the herbal remedy that is helping your mother.

My husband and I are in our mid-seventies. We do not have Alzheimer's (yet). We'll make sure to save the info you give for in case we might need it in the future, that is, if we by then can remember it. :-)


message 17: by Lilo (last edited Oct 06, 2017 10:04PM) (new) - added it

Lilo Hi, Stewart,

Mary's comment just led me back to your review of this book, which I bought more than 2 years ago and which has since been sleeping somewhere in my boxes of unread books.

I haven't had very much time for reading due to all kinds of real-life calamities. I also haven't been much on GR because of ongoing internet-connection problems. (The only internet provider in our area won't spend the money to instal fiberglass optic in our canyon, and the wires are overloaded.) These issues are also the reason why my books remain unpublished. Sigh!

How is your mom doing? And how are you and your 2-legged and 4-legged family?

We are, meanwhile, down to 19 1/2 cats, have still the same troublesome 2 dogs, but have added a highly troublesome rooster to our (in 2015 acquired) 8 chickens.

Politics here in the U.S. have been disgusting since last Nov. 9. Maybe we should move to Thailand.--Just kidding. Too many animals to take along.


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