Scott Holstad's Reviews > Fumbling the Future: How Xerox Invented, Then Ignored, the First Personal Computer

Fumbling the Future by Douglas K. Smith
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it was amazing

I think this is an excellent overview of how Xerox created the first personal computer in 1973 and then did absolutely nothing with it, due to unbelievable incompetence, thus losing out on the biggest market share any company has probably ever seen and billions of dollars. It supplements Dealers of Lightning, which is an excellent book on Xerox PARC, the research facility behind the creation of the computer, and gives a behind the scenes look from the top level down of the company as a whole. Thus, I think the two books go well together, hand in hand. By 1973, PARC had created a system they called EARS (Ethernet, Alto, Research character generator, Scanned laser output). So, they invented ethernet, the PC (the Alto), the mouse, and the laser printer. They also produced the first bit mapped images on the first GUI displays, some of the first and easiest programming languages, the first easy to use text editor, and a host of other things. And all Xerox management did was pretend they didn't exist. Cause Xerox Sold Copiers!!! What the hell were computers anyway? They were just glorified word processors for secretaries. (Wouldn't that have given them enough business to start producing them?) By the time 1980 rolled around, it became clear that other companies were eating them for lunch and their market share had plummeted, and IBM was rumored to be investing in their own PC, so Xerox finally got serious. With the Star. Created by a group that was separate from PARC, Xerox's embarrassment. When the Star was released, it cost about $12,000 and needed a $30,000 printer and God knows what else. And it wouldn't run anyone else's software. Meanwhile all of these little Japanese companies were creating cheap PCs with standardized parts that could run anyone's software and use anyone's parts. The Star was a disaster. Xerox was never the same. I seriously hope the morons at the top learned their lesson. Finally, I noticed this book was published in 1999, although first published in 1988 by iUniverse, which is a self publishing company. I have no idea why these authors self published. In my opinion, this book is good enough for a traditional publisher to have snapped up and published. Maybe they were just impatient, I don't know. Regardless, it was a good book and certainly recommended for anyone interested in learning about the interesting history behind the first personal computer.
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Reading Progress

May 5, 2015 – Started Reading
May 5, 2015 – Shelved
May 8, 2015 – Finished Reading

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message 1: by Paul (new) - added it

Paul Cooper Painful memories in 1987 trying to sell the Star (which by then was called the Documentor) for thousands of pounds


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