Edward's Reviews > Winesburg, Ohio

Winesburg, Ohio by Sherwood Anderson
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it was amazing
bookshelves: fiction, north-america, own, 5-star

Introduction

--The Book of the Grotesque

--Hands, concerning Wing Biddlebaum
--Paper Pills, concerning Doctor Reefy
--Mother, concerning Elizabeth Willard
--The Philosopher, concerning Doctor Parcival
--Nobody Knows, concerning Louise Trunnion

Godliness, a Tale in Four Parts:
--I, concerning Jesse Bentley
--II, also concerning Jesse Bentley
--III, Surrender, concerning Louise Bentley
--IV, Terror, concerning David Hardy

--A Man of Ideas, concerning Joe Welling
--Adventure, concerning Alice Hindman
--Respectability, concerning Wash Williams
--The Thinker, concerning Seth Richmond
--Tandy, concerning Tandy Hard
--The Strength of God, concerning the Reverend Curtis Hartman
--The Teacher, concerning Kate Swift
--Loneliness, concerning Enoch Robinson
--An Awakening, concerning Belle Carpenter
--"Queer", concerning Elmer Cowley
--The Untold Lie, concerning Ray Pearson
--Drink, concerning Tom Foster
--Death, concerning Doctor Reefy and Elizabeth Willard
--Sophistication, concerning Helen White
--Departure, concerning George Willard
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Reading Progress

Finished Reading
April 29, 2015 – Shelved
April 29, 2015 – Shelved as: to-read
April 29, 2015 – Shelved as: fiction
April 29, 2015 – Shelved as: north-america
May 19, 2015 – Shelved as: own
June 28, 2015 – Shelved as: 5-star

Comments Showing 1-2 of 2 (2 new)

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Edward "At the upper end of the Fair Ground, in Winesburg, there is a half decayed old grand-stand. It has never been painted and the boards are all warped out of shape. The Fair Ground stands on top of a low hill rising out of the valley of Wine Creek and from the grand-stand one can see at night, over a cornfield, the lights of the town reflected against the sky.
George and Helen climbed the hill to the Fair Ground, coming by the path past Waterworks Pond. The feeling of loneliness and isolation that had come to the young man in the crowded streets of his town was both broken and intensified by the presence of Helen. What he felt was reflected in her.
In youth there are always two forces fighting in people. The warm unthinking little animal struggles against the thing that reflects and remembers, and the older, the more sophisticated thing had possession of George Willard. Sensing his mood, Helen walked beside him filled with respect. When they got to the grand-stand they climbed up under the roof and sat down on one of the long bench-like seats.
There is something memorable in the experience to be had by going into a fair ground that stands at the edge of a Middle Western town on a night after the annual fair has been held. The sensation is one never to be forgotten. On all sides are ghosts, not of the dead, but of living people. Here, during the day just passed, have come the people pouring in from the town and the country around. Farmers with their wives and children and all the people from the hundreds of little frame houses have gathered within these board walls. Young girls have laughed and men with beards have talked of the affairs of their lives. The place has been filled to overflowing with life. It has itched and squirmed with life and now it is night and the life has all gone away. The silence is almost terrifying. One conceals oneself standing silently beside the trunk of a tree and what there is of a reflective tendency in his nature is intensified. One shudders at the thought of the meaninglessness of life while at the same instant, and if the people of the town are his people, one loves life so intensely that tears come into the eyes.
In the darkness under the roof of the grand-stand, George Willard sat beside Helen White and felt very keenly his own insignificance in the scheme of existence. Now that he had come out of town where the presence of the people stirring about, busy with a multitude of affairs, had been so irritating, the irritation was all gone. The presence of Helen renewed and refreshed him. It was as though her woman's hand was assisting him to make some minute readjustment of the machinery of his life. He began to think of the people in the town where he had always lived with something like reverence. He had reverence for Helen. He wanted to love and to be loved by her, but he did not want at the moment to be confused by her womanhood. In the darkness he took hold of her hand and when she crept close put a hand on her shoulder. A wind began to blow and he shivered. With all his strength he tried to hold and to understand the mood that had come upon him. In that high place in the darkness the two oddly sensitive human atoms held each other tightly and waited. In the mind of each was the same thought. 'I have come to this lonely place and here is this other,' was the substance of the thing felt.
In Winesburg the crowded day had run itself out into the long night of the late fall. Farm horses jogged away along lonely country roads pulling their portion of weary people. Clerks began to bring samples of goods in off the sidewalks and lock the doors of stores. In the Opera House a crowd had gathered to see a show and further down Main Street the fiddlers, their instruments tuned, sweated and worked to keep the feet of youth flying over a dance floor.
In the darkness in the grand-stand Helen White and George Willard remained silent."


Stosch good book


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