Larissa's Reviews > Borkmann's Point

Borkmann's Point by Håkan Nesser
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Jan 09, 2008

it was ok
bookshelves: crime-fiction, in-translation, police-procedural, swedish, 2011, series
Read from June 28 to July 18, 2011

The basic premise is this: Detective Chief Inspector Van Veeteren of the (imaginary) city of Maarsdam is vacationing in the nearby seaside town Kaalbringen. Although he’s scheduled to go back to work, he’s recruited to stay in town and join forces with the local Kaalbringen police after a man murdered with an ax is discovered. Shortly after, there is another murder—similar in method, although the victims have nothing apparent in common. While he quickly bonds with the members of the Kaalbringen police force (particularly the clever inspector Beate Moerk and DCI Bausen), Van Veeteren sees no solution, even as the case drags on for two months and results in yet another murder.

Some thoughts on the tepid execution (no pun intended) of this story:

1. Borkmann's Point now has the dubious distinction of introducing the most transparent killer since my Mary Higgins Clark reading days. I honestly guessed the killer on page 59 (the book is 321 pages total) and while there were moments throughout that were meant to telegraph the murderer's identity to the reader, it's clear that the big reveal at the end is supposed to be a shocker. But it isn't, except perhaps to Van Veeteren, who for months has been dispensing sage advice and telling people that he'll “only have to set eyes on [the murder’s] type” and then he'll know whodunit. If this is supposed to be ironic, it doesn't come across at all.

We are later supposed to believe that Van Veeteren was actually on to the killer much sooner, but Nesser purposefully cloaks his hero's thoughts—and much of his investigative work—in secrecy. We're told that VV makes calls to follow up on hunches, but we don't know to who or what he finds out. He takes trips to check out clues, but he doesn't tell us (or his underlings) where he is going. It's like reading an Agatha Christie novel, but without the charm. The only thing that makes this any more bearable is that the police inspector who joins Van Veeteren from Maarsdam—Münster—frequently notes that his boss is “sitting there, playing the asshole and being mysterious again,” which does provide a nice bit of relief from The Great Detective's ego.

2. Nesser is awful at writing women. There is a chapter in which inspector Beate Moerk is at home, contemplating the case, her weight, and her status as a single woman and a female detective, during which Nesser writes, “She started soaping her breasts...still firm and bouncy; another recurrent thought was that one day she would start to dislike her breasts—the whole of her body come to that. But naturally, that was a trauma she shared with all women.” Ugh.

Later, Van Veeteren meets a woman in the course of the case and makes an empty promise about how long it'll take him to crack it. The woman leaves, comforted, and VV snickers to himself: “How easy it is to fool a woman...a woman you've only known for five minutes.” Again, there might be some underlying irony here—Van Veeteren is arrogant about fooling ladies all while he's being fooled himself. But even so, the sort of easy chauvinism here only made me like him less than I already did.

3. These people are investigating a serial ax murderer and yet, not much investigating seems to really happen. Even if there aren't a lot of clues, it seems to me that it'd be worth spending far more time tracking down former associates, lovers, flat-mates, etc. to get more insight into the lives of the victims. Find possible connections. Right? As is, everyone spends the day kinda-sorta talking about the case at the local pastry shop and they all go home at the end of the day with a bit of a shrug. Van Veeteren spends night after night with DCI Bausen playing chess, eating rich gourmet dinners, and sampling multiple bottles of fine vintage wine from Bausen's private collection. No one really seems all that fussed, honestly, except for Münster, the skeptical inspector from Maarsdam who wants to go home to his wife and kids. Which makes me think that maybe we'd all be better served if the book was about Münster—who cares even a little about the outcome of the case—as opposed to Van Veeteren.
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Comments (showing 1-3 of 3) (3 new)

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message 1: by Carolyn (new)

Carolyn This was a good commentary. I haven't read this author yet, but am forewarned what to expect. To me, characterisation is what can make or break a book, hence my fondness for Arnaldur. I particularly get annoyed with authors who cannot portray women realistically. Earlier spy fiction writers were notoriously bad at this. Thanks for this, Larissa


Larissa Thanks! I love inspector Erlendur, too--and his coworkers. If I'm remembering correctly, Elinborg is a well-drawn character in her own right. If you do end up reading any Nesser novels, I'd be interested to know what you think.


message 3: by Carolyn (new)

Carolyn Elinborg was the lead character in "Outrage", the latest in the series translated into English. I really liked getting to know her. Have you read it yet? I keep wondering why there is a 2 or 3 year time delay for the translations. I will keep a lookout for some Nesser books.


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