Manolo Alvarez's Reviews > Enchiridion

Enchiridion by Epictetus
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really liked it
Read 2 times. Last read November 6, 2014 to November 13, 2014.


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Quotes Manolo Liked

Epictetus
“Men are disturbed not by the things which happen, but by the opinions about the things:”
Epictetus, Enchiridion

Epictetus
“Disease is an impediment to the body, but not to the will, unless the will itself chooses. Lameness is an impediment to the leg, but not to the will. And add this reflection on the occasion of everything that happens; for you will find it an impediment to something else, but not to yourself.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion

Epictetus
“Remember that in life you ought to behave as at a banquet. Suppose that something is carried round and is opposite to you. Stretch out your hand and take a portion with decency. Suppose that it passes by you. Do not detain it. Suppose that it is not yet come to you. Do not send your desire forward to it, but wait till it is opposite to you.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion

Epictetus
“These reasonings do not cohere: I am richer than you, therefore I am better than you; I am more eloquent than you, therefore I am better than you. On the contrary these rather cohere, I am richer than you, therefore my possessions are greater than yours: I am more eloquent than you, therefore my speech is superior to yours. But you are neither possession nor speech.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion

Epictetus
“It is better to do wrong seldom and to own it, and to act right for the most part, than seldom to admit that you have done wrong and to do wrong often.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion

Epictetus
“Those who are well constituted in the body endure both heat and cold: and so those who are well constituted in the soul endure both anger and grief and excessive joy and the other affects.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion

Epictetus
“In banquets remember that you entertain two guests, body and soul: and whatever you shall have given to the body you soon eject: but what you shall have given to the soul, you keep always.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion

Epictetus
“If you wish your house to be well managed, imitate the Spartan Lycurgus. For as he did not fence his city with walls, but fortified the inhabitants by virtue and preserved the city always free;35 so do you not cast around (your house) a large court and raise high towers, but strengthen the dwellers by good-will and fidelity and friendship, and then nothing harmful will enter it, not even if the whole band of wickedness shall array itself against it.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion

Epictetus
“You will do the greatest services to the state, if you shall raise not the roofs of the houses, but the souls of the citizens: for it is better that great souls should dwell in small houses than for mean slaves to lurk in great houses.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion

Epictetus
“Do not decorate the walls of your house with the valuable stones from Eubœa and Sparta; but adorn the minds (breasts) of the citizens and of those who administer the state with the instruction which comes from Hellas (Greece). For states are well governed by the wisdom (judgment) of men, but not by stone and wood.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion

Epictetus
“Epictetus being asked how a man should give pain to his enemy answered, By preparing himself to live the best life that he can.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion

Epictetus
“Be free from grief not through insensibility like the irrational animals, nor through want of thought like the foolish, but like a man of virtue by having reason as the consolation of grief.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion

Epictetus
“You are a little soul carrying a dead body, as Epictetus said.”
Epictetus, Enchiridion


Reading Progress

November 6, 2014 – Started Reading
November 6, 2014 – Shelved
November 9, 2014 –
page 22
50.0%
November 9, 2014 –
22.0%
November 10, 2014 –
52.0%
November 12, 2014 –
80.0%
Started Reading (Kindle Edition)
November 13, 2014 – Shelved (Kindle Edition)
November 13, 2014 – Finished Reading
November 13, 2014 – Finished Reading (Kindle Edition)

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