Glenn Russell's Reviews > Naked Lunch

Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs
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it was amazing


Glenn R --- Speak to us straight about your Lunch that’s bare
Twisted, dirty and anything but fair.
Your words like needles sticking in our veins
As you write of dopefiends, coke bugs and dames.

William B --- Rube, the word we use in this world is junk
You’ll hear straight without funny stuff or funk.
Read the damn book; I have nothing more to add
For embellishing perfection has never been a fad.

This is a one-of-a-kind novel. I'll be posting a review in the next week. Couldn't help myself with the rhyming couplets since Burroughs is at the extreme opposite end of the literary spectrum from Alexander Pope, to say the least.
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Reading Progress

Finished Reading
November 3, 2014 – Shelved

Comments Showing 1-4 of 4 (4 new)

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message 1: by Lynda (new)

Lynda I shall wait a week for your review
To see if it's a book I'll queue
But somehow I just have a hunch
That I'll be reading Naked Lunch


Glenn Russell Lynda wrote: "I shall wait a week for your review
To see if it's a book I'll queue
But somehow I just have a hunch
That I'll be reading Naked Lunch"


Ha!!


message 3: by Vipassana (new) - added it

Vipassana I just read an interview of William S. Burroughs in the Paris Review. Something he said there caught my attention -- Anything that can be done chemically can be done in other ways, that is, if we have sufficient knowledge of the processes involved.

After I landed here, I remembered you also said something similar in your review of Steppenwolf :)


message 4: by Glenn (last edited Feb 25, 2015 10:38AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Glenn Russell Vipassana wrote: "I just read an interview of William S. Burroughs in the Paris Review. Something he said there caught my attention -- Anything that can be done chemically can be done in other ways, that is, if we h..."

Thanks for your comment, Vipassana. Yes, usually young readers back in the 60s saw Steppenwolf as a novel one reads in combination with taking LSD and other mind-bending drugs. Hesse disagreed -- he though those hallucinogenic states could be had by imagination, attention to dreams, creativity and a courageous opening to one's unconscious and what Jung called the collective unconscious.


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