Jeffrey Keeten's Reviews > Us

Us by David Nicholls
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”’I was looking forward to us growing old together. Me and you, growing old and dying together.'

'Douglas, who in their right mind would look forward to that?’”


This was the conversation moments after Douglas Petersen’s wife rolls over in bed and informs him that she believes their marriage is finished. Their son Albie is a few weeks away from leaving for college and she “wants to feel this is the beginning of something new, not the beginning of the end.” For some people a conversation like this would not come as a surprise, there had been flashing red lights for years. For Douglas, who has enjoyed almost three decades of involvement with this woman, it comes out of the dark like a mugger’s leather clad fist impacting the side of his jaw.

Douglas is a man as stable and predictable as the sun and the moon. He is a biochemist studying among other things the genital architecture of the fruit fly. Maybe not exciting stuff to others, but being able to study evolutionary mutations in a few generations instead of waiting a millennium can be fascinating work.

His wife Connie has an artist’s soul. She is creative and used to sketch pictures of people before motherhood became all consuming. Albie shares her same passion for art, music, and photography. Douglas doesn’t always understand their passions, but he does appreciate the intensity they have for their interests. It is the same way he feels about science. He loved Connie’s sketches and when they buy their first house he offers to build her an artist’s studio. David Nicholls moves us between the past and the present as Douglas relives their life together. One of the painful things to watch as this plot unfolds, is Douglas trying to support his wife’s and son’s interests only to somehow always say or do the wrong thing.

Part of this is he is not “right minded”. They know this, so any attempt he makes to appreciate art the same way they do somehow diminishes their own enjoyment. If he likes a piece of art then it must not be any good.

Connie springs this urge to” discover herself” on him just before they are to begin a family grand tour of Europe. Maybe not the best timing. He chooses to believe that she is only thinking about leaving him, that the jury is still out. The European vacation is one more chance for him to prove himself, to win the hand he most wants to hold for the rest of his life, one more time.

Albie is the typical moody teenager who has become an expert at dividing and conquering his parents. Connie, always the protective hen about his artistic interests, is also the reliable counter weight to Douglas’s attempts to pin Albie down on exactly what his plans are to become successful. There are two competing schools of thought on what success really means. To Connie it is pursuing your interests to the detriment of financial security. To Douglas it is to pursue a way to make a living and with spare time chase those artistic dreams. Neither system generally leads to happiness. The best chance anyone has of achieving any level of contentment is to find that tricky balance between financial stability and still manage to find ways to express themselves through a creative endeavor. For instance, a circulation manager in the Midwest might decide to write book reviews so he doesn’t go fruit loops for cocoa puffs. I know it isn’t as sexy as writing poetry, but it is a form of expression.

So after hoisting this Sword of Damocles over Douglas’s head Connie assures him that they must keep up appearances on this trip for Albie’s sake.

@*%#!

Marriage has always been difficult, and with each new study the divorce rate is climbing all over the world. The divorce rate in the United States is estimated to be at 53%. Fortunately for Douglas he has better odds in Great Britain at 42%. Money is still the #1 reason for divorce, but I think the truth of the matter is that wrapped around any of the top reasons for divorce is the spectre of boredom. There is the seven year itch. Then the next big detriment to marriage is when the kids are finally scooted off to college, exactly the circumstances that Douglas is facing.

People can not expect their spouse to make them happy. We are each responsible for our own happiness. Anyone is certainly gambling with bad odds thinking a new spouse will be the key to happiness. The divorce rate goes up exponentially with each new attempt. Third marriages have a 73% divorce rate. This all said, sometimes the spouse is the source of the unhappiness and the only resolution is divorce, but if we examine boredom as a main ingredient for divorce many might be mistaking comfort and dependability for tediousness.

Douglas fits the trustworthy, no frills profile which might be considered dull especially if you have an artistic temperament. I have a feeling that Connie is not self-stimulating when it comes to producing art and that she needs someone or something to awaken those urges in her. Douglas can be as supportive as he wants to be, but he will never be a muse.

Connie is perfectly happy with their marriage and sees it as a success. Douglas also sees their marriage as a success and doesn’t understand why it can’t continue.

Last chance Douglas...the Petersen grand tour of Europe.

Douglas tries to move into their artistic circle, but is met with skepticism and derision. He googles like a madman trying to find interesting facts to share. ”Perhaps this is why those museum audio-guides had become so popular; a reassuring voice in your ear, telling you what to think and feel. Look to your left, take note, please observe; how terrific it would be to carry that voice with you always, out of the museum and throughout all of life.”

When a family dispute has Albie running away from the grand tour Connie goes home, but Douglas decides that this may be the last chance he has to ever make things right with his son.

David Nicholls follows up the phenomenally successful One Day with this amusing, but at times painfully real look at relationships between sons and fathers, between sons and mothers, and between wives and husbands. For those of you that have survived the teenage wars with your children, (I have recently graduated to survivor status.) depending on the part that you’ve had to play, you very well may find yourself wanting to strangle/hug one or two of the characters in this book. You will experience a whirlwind tour through the Netherlands, France, Italy, with the grand finale occurring in Spain. To say the least, Douglas comes home a changed man, and though he isn’t happy about the state of his marriage he is less fearful of the life that may exist after it.

If you wish to see more of my most recent book and movie reviews, visit http://www.jeffreykeeten.com
I also have a Facebook blogger page at:https://www.facebook.com/JeffreyKeeten

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Reading Progress

October 28, 2014 – Shelved
October 28, 2014 – Shelved as: to-read
November 8, 2014 – Started Reading
November 8, 2014 – Finished Reading

Comments Showing 1-50 of 57 (57 new)


message 1: by Dolors (last edited Nov 12, 2014 01:54PM) (new)

Dolors Why is it that this review feels painstakingly real to me Jeffrey? I have met Nicholls on two occasions and his tragic-comic tone filters effortlessly through your writing. Your musings on marriage and divorce reminded me of a new favorite character of mine, Olive Kitteridge, whom I am sure you'd find equally exasperating and familiar. Another helluva review, Mr. Keeten.


message 2: by Lily (last edited Nov 12, 2014 02:41PM) (new) - added it

Lily I do not look forward to the teenage wars. I want to have a plan for it, but I don't think it works that way. Great review. I really like One Day and want to read this soon.


Jeffrey Keeten Dolors wrote: "Why is it that this review feels painstakingly real to me Jeffrey? I have met Nicholls on two occasions and his tragic-comic tone filters effortlessly through your writing. Your musings on marriage..."

I have not had the pleasure of meeting Olive yet, but I have had several people tell me that I need to make her acquaintance. Sometimes, I'm not even aware that I'm doing it, but I do mimic the writing style or the theme of the book when writing my reviews. I'm always pleasantly surprised when one of my friends mentions it to me.

I've been reading Henry James short stories before going to bed in the evenings. I've noticed that in my pleasure writing, recently, there has been some Jamesesque overtones appearing in the turn of a phrase or an exchange of dialogue. Maybe what I am is a mimic writer. Want a Proustian novel for fall, call that man Keeten? haha Thank you Miss Dolors, I always appreciate your insights into the gears and delicate mechanisms that make up my tragic-comic self.


Jeffrey Keeten Lily wrote: "I do not look forward to the teenage wars. I want to have a plan for it, but I don't think it works that way. Great review. I really like One Day and want to read this soon."

Both of my teenagers were very different and so any plan you have must be made out of elastic and rubber because it will need to warp and conform to unexplainable changes in your teenagers's outlook. I do believe that it is much harder raising a teenager now than ever before. There are so many more influences on them that create more touch points of conflicts with their parents. One of the things that Douglas says in the book is that he can't believe the things that Albie will say to him. Things that he would have never dreamed of saying to his father. I had many, many moments like that. My father only had to look at me and I knew it was time to fly straight. I do wish you well Lily and hope that you too survive the teenage wars.


message 5: by Lily (new) - added it

Lily Thank you. I agree with everything you said. I've been lucky so far. Hopefully, those years will be wonderful. I'm optimistic.


message 6: by Lily (new) - added it

Lily A small battle instead of a war. ;)


message 7: by Diane (new) - added it

Diane Barnes I grabbed the ARC of this one, and can't wait to read it. Your review makes me look forward to it even more. To anyone going thru the teen wars or looking at it in the future, you WILL get thru it, and they DO turn into human beings again. It just takes a while. I would hate to navigate those years while going thru a divorce, but lots of people do. The artistic temperment vs. the scientific, logical mind gives this book added interest to me. I deal with that every day, but it can be done with respect and understanding on both sides. Good point about the boredom theory, Jeffrey. Wonder if marriage counselors know about it?


message 8: by Margitte (new)

Margitte You summarize the book so well, I almost feel part of the family. The 'me'-disciples find the concept of 'us' too incomprehensible or unacceptable. Somewhere is an expression that says the parts become more important than the whole, or something like that. It might explain why everything tends to fall apart, right?


message 9: by s.penkevich (new)

s.penkevich Wow, exquisite review. I already feel engrained in the novel's world. Lots of press on this one lately, good to hear it is a good book! Wonderful work as always!


message 10: by Arah-Lynda (new) - added it

Arah-Lynda Excellent as always Jeffrey. I too am a survivor.


message 11: by Caroline (last edited Nov 12, 2014 10:16PM) (new)

Caroline Lovely, lovely, lovely - the review and the comments afterwards. I just get so many insights and so much enjoyment from reading your reviews :O)

I am childless, and regard most of those who have children with awe and respect. I live in an area with fantastically good schools, and the kids around here tend to be awesomely civilized. They hold open doors for you and say please and thank you. Behind other doors I'm sure they have roaring disagreements with their parents from time to time - but to passers-by like myself they seem absolutely charming.


message 12: by [Name Redacted] (last edited Nov 12, 2014 10:28PM) (new)

[Name Redacted] Don't know if someone else mentioned this already, but they've actually determined that the "50+%" divorce rate is complete bunk -- it counts second and third and etc. marriages the same way as first marriages, which means it artificially inflates the stat. Most people who get married stay married, but a considerable percentage of people who get divorced will get divorced again in their subsequent marriages (and the likelihood keeps increasing for each subsequent marriage thereafter).

Also, I'd argue that the real reason for most divorces is selfishness on the part of one or both partners...


message 13: by Cecily (last edited Aug 10, 2015 10:47PM) (new)

Cecily A superb review. I'm tempted to read the book (I've enjoyed his previous two - more than I expected), but I fear this one may be too close to home.


Malia Great review! Glad you enjoyed this! I thought it was such a nice, thoughtful book.


Jeffrey Keeten [Name Redacted] wrote: "Don't know if someone else mentioned this already, but they've actually determined that the "50+%" divorce rate is complete bunk -- it counts second and third and etc. marriages the same way as fir..."

Stats are always a great forum for discussion with one group coming up with one certifiable set of stats and another coming up with a debunking certifiable set of stats. I have two thoughts about your statement. First for your assertion to be true would mean that you don't consider second and third etc. marriages to be real marriages. Meaning they should not be counted in a sampling of divorces. Second they must be a large percentage of the sampling size to move the statistical percentage. I did also use the term "estimated". Now that all said this is not my stat, so I have no skin in the game to defend it. I know from watching the whirligig of marriages in my neighborhood that it would be hard for me to dispute the percentage used in my review. My main point was to show that divorces in Great Britain were lower than the United States, so we can plug whatever numbers you wish into that statement and hopefully my overall assertion would still be correct.

I agree that selfishness/boredom are a main contributor to divorce.


Jeffrey Keeten Diane wrote: "I grabbed the ARC of this one, and can't wait to read it. Your review makes me look forward to it even more. To anyone going thru the teen wars or looking at it in the future, you WILL get thru i..."

Respect is a very key word to a successful marriage. Opposites do attractive which also leaves a large field of battle to fight small skirmishes and major conflicts. I think that Douglas and Connie had a strong marriage because they did have different sets of interest.

I have seen too many marriages break up due to misdiagnosis by mistaking comfort and safety for boredom. I'm hoping that trend will flip around at some point and time, but marriage overall is on pretty rocky ground for the millenniums. I hope you enjoy this one Diane.


Jeffrey Keeten Margitte wrote: "You summarize the book so well, I almost feel part of the family. The 'me'-disciples find the concept of 'us' too incomprehensible or unacceptable. Somewhere is an expression that says the parts be..."

There is too much emphasis on the individual, on individual accomplishment, and we are certainly paying a price in trying to parent without being accused of infringing on their rights as individuals. The same applies to marriages, being bound to a common cause is a good thing, and no one should feel diminished by it, but unfortunately too many people do. Thanks Margitte. I agree with you wholeheartedly.


Jeffrey Keeten s.penkevich wrote: "Wow, exquisite review. I already feel engrained in the novel's world. Lots of press on this one lately, good to hear it is a good book! Wonderful work as always!"

Thank you S.Penk! I haven't read his other books, but the praise I hear is encouraging me to read more Nicholls. Always good to hear from my fellow scrivener.


message 19: by Wastrel (new)

Wastrel As with most statistical questions, I guess it depends what exactly you mean:
- the number of marriages that end in divorce (what the stat means)
- the number of people who get married who end up getting divorced (what people might think the stat means)

Obviously once you have multiple marriages these two stats will no longer be the same.


Jeffrey Keeten Arah-Lynda wrote: "Excellent as always Jeffrey. I too am a survivor."

Welcome! I feel like a Phoenix rising from the flames ready to begin a whole new life. Thanks Arah-Lynda!


Jeffrey Keeten Caroline wrote: "Lovely, lovely, lovely - the review and the comments afterwards. I just get so many insights and so much enjoyment from reading your reviews :O)

I am childless, and regard most of those who have..."


Do you live in Mayberry? haha Wonderful vision of children! The way it should be. It sounds like you live in a pocket that has not been tainted by the me-disease.

Thank you Caroline! You too contribute to making my reviews better!


Jeffrey Keeten Cecily wrote: "A superb review. I'm tempted to read the book (I've enjoyed his previous two - more than I expected), but I fear this oneo may be too close to home."

That was my concern with reading it as well. Even after I brought it home from the library I waffled on starting it. The humor is sprinkled so carefully throughout the text that I was able to read the book without falling into a full on flashback depression. :-) Though I will tell you there were certainly some scenes that opened up some barely healed scars. Those moments of feeling skewered. Thanks Cecily!


Jeffrey Keeten Malia wrote: "Great review! Glad you enjoyed this! I thought it was such a nice, thoughtful book."

Thanks Malia! I'm glad to see you enjoyed it as well!


Jeffrey Keeten Wastrel wrote: "As with most statistical questions, I guess it depends what exactly you mean:
- the number of marriages that end in divorce (what the stat means)
- the number of people who get married who end up g..."


The conundrum of defending statistics. Thanks Wastrel you put it very clear and succinctly.


Lynne King What a wonderful review Jeffrey. I told you that would be the case and I was right!


Jeffrey Keeten Lynne wrote: "What a wonderful review Jeffrey. I told you that would be the case and I was right!"

Thanks for giving me the gentle push to read and review this book. I'm relieved that my review lived up to your expectations. Whew! Thank you Lynne!


message 27: by Laima (new) - added it

Laima Wonderful review, Jeffrey! I feel like you just wrote a synopsis of my life. There are many things I can relate to here. My sons are now in their 20's and I too could not believe some of the things they did and said as teens. I would never have dreamed of being that way with my parents. And regarding divorce, I have seen many friends & family go through it. Happy to say I just celebrated my 26th anniversary!


Jeffrey Keeten Laima wrote: "Wonderful review, Jeffrey! I feel like you just wrote a synopsis of my life. There are many things I can relate to here. My sons are now in their 20's and I too could not believe some of the things..."

I have a feeling you will really relate to this book. It will bring back memories of a variety of stripes, but hopefully by the end you will understand what you went through better. I know I did. I will be celebrating my 22nd in January! Too many of my friends and family have divorced as well. It is fascinating to see couples continue who I think don't have a chance and then the couples I think are made for each other flame out early. No rhyme or reason to the marriage game. Thanks Laima!


message 29: by Lily (new) - added it

Lily Selfishness and boredom do contribute to divorce, but I also know people do change and that maintaining a marriage is hard work. If you stop working on it, there's possibility of it dissolving. All the women I know struggle with anxiety. There's a lot of pressure to do it all these days. The list of reasons can go on and on. I felt the need to comment. I thought about divorce this afternoon after a friend of mine opened up to me about hers. She is from Bulgaria and it was interesting hearing her thoughts on it. It's a very broad topic. Every relationship is different and alike.


Jeffrey Keeten Lily wrote: "Selfishness and boredom do contribute to divorce, but I also know people do change and that maintaining a marriage is hard work. If you stop working on it, there's possibility of it dissolving. Al..."

I absolutely agree with you Lily. It takes much more work than what people think it will. I think women and men are both under a lot more stress than people were 20, 50 years ago. The cost of living is so much higher now and finances are still the number #1 reason for divorce. Thanks for sharing your comment Lily!


message 31: by Lawyer (new)

Lawyer Excellent review, Sir. However, the subject matter is too close to the bone for this old fellah. Been there, done that. Humming a little tune. Love is lovelier the second time around. Just as wonderful with both feet on the ground. It's that second time you hear your love song sung.


message 32: by John (new)

John Behle Jeffrey--always a pleasure to chime in on your threads. This book is a novel but I'm a non-fiction buff. I see many people-I-know living this script. Glad we are talking about feelings and relationships.

So what did I start doing? I am reading James Risen's new book on greed, corruption and war, "Pay Any Price." How the US flew cash by the billions to Iraq...and what do you know, it disappeared.


Jeffrey Keeten Mike wrote: "Excellent review, Sir. However, the subject matter is too close to the bone for this old fellah. Been there, done that. Humming a little tune. Love is lovelier the second time around. Just as wo..."

I understand Sir Michael! This book would probably bring back a slew of memories that would have you singing a different tune. Thanks Mike!


message 34: by Jeffrey (last edited Nov 16, 2014 05:47AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Jeffrey Keeten John wrote: "Jeffrey--always a pleasure to chime in on your threads. This book is a novel but I'm a non-fiction buff. I see many people-I-know living this script. Glad we are talking about feelings and relati..."

I love reading nonfiction and read a lot of it, but I feel that novels are equally important resources for learning about ourselves. There are things like dialogue and inner thoughts that can be explored more thoroughly in novels than in nonfiction. There are points of reference that can make people feel less alone in the world. When people talk about a book that changed their lives, almost always that is a novel. There are reasons why certain novels are read for a hundred years or more where most nonfiction (there are some really good exceptions..Gibbon for one) becomes irrelevant.


message 35: by John (new)

John Behle Great perspective, Jeffrey. Whoa baby...the points of reference that can make people feel less lonely in this world....yes. Anybody, any form of art, any hand reaching out, that can help in this goal, I salute.


Seemita I just finished this one and felt a sense of contentment at the end even though somethings didn't fall in their places. But what is a rightful place? Hmmm... No one knows really.

Your review is a splendid snapshot of this sweeping yet humorous roller-coaster tour, Jeffrey! Enjoyed reading it.


Jeffrey Keeten Seemita wrote: "I just finished this one and felt a sense of contentment at the end even though somethings didn't fall in their places. But what is a rightful place? Hmmm... No one knows really.

Your review is a ..."


I took a chance on this one because I've just recently survived the epic battle of raising teenagers. Luckily the humor helped to keep the wounds from bleeding again. :-) Thanks Seemita! I'm glad you enjoyed this book!


message 38: by Mark (new) - rated it 4 stars

Mark Hebwood Interesting for me to read through the comments. Clearly, the book speaks to us on a personal level, and this need not be in the perhaps more obvious way of reflecting our own family life. I do not have kids, but the book resonated with me nonetheless. One thing I found masterful is how David succeeded in showing two perspectives of the lead character, an internal AND and external one, through the narrative form of the I-narrator. Something that struck me on a personal level is the interplay between creativity and analysis in a personality. My sense was that Douglas is insufficiently creative to be a brilliant scientist, and Connie insufficiently (self)-analytical to be a brilliant artist. But I do not want to give the impression that I think there is obvious symmetry in the characters - there is not. This story is less about "them", and more about Douglas, it seems to me...


message 39: by [Name Redacted] (last edited May 11, 2015 02:48AM) (new)

[Name Redacted] Jeffrey wrote: "[Name Redacted] wrote: "Don't know if someone else mentioned this already, but they've actually determined that the "50+%" divorce rate is complete bunk -- it counts second and third and etc. marri..."

...What? I'm not sure what you mean. The statistical studies themselves state what they counted as "marriages" -- ANY marriages. It wasn't a matter of a separate set being compiled by other researchers, it was a matter of the original stats. And people who get married are statistically likely to stay married, while those who get divorced and then re-marry are statistically more likely to get divorced again than they are to stay married to their second spouse.

Also, I have no idea how those two facts somehow equate to re-marriages not being counted as "real" marriages in your estimate.


Jeffrey Keeten Mark wrote: "Interesting for me to read through the comments. Clearly, the book speaks to us on a personal level, and this need not be in the perhaps more obvious way of reflecting our own family life. I do not..."

Great thoughts Mark! I probably would have liked the book more if I hadn't just been through the teenage wars raising my kids. There were certainly moments in the book when Douglas is baffled by both his son and his wife's responses that took the scab off an unhealed wound. The humor was a good life jacket to keep the plot from sinking into the morose. Thanks Mark!


Jeffrey Keeten [Name Redacted] wrote: "Jeffrey wrote: "[Name Redacted] wrote: "Don't know if someone else mentioned this already, but they've actually determined that the "50+%" divorce rate is complete bunk -- it counts second and thir..."

I made that comment so long ago. You disappeared! haha I don't remember for sure, but it seemed your comment was discounting remarriages from counting against the overall divorce rate. You feel that most people who get married stay married ie in a first marriage situation and that a small group of people who remarry over and over again are skewing the stats.

I was using statistics that say different, but if you have better statistics I will defer to your judgement. When I included those stats in the review I was merely trying to show how difficult it has become for people to stay married. My view might be skewed because many of my friends in recent years have ended their first marriages so the stats were believable to me.


message 42: by Mark (new) - rated it 4 stars

Mark Hebwood Jeffrey wrote: "Mark wrote: "Interesting for me to read through the comments. Clearly, the book speaks to us on a personal level, and this need not be in the perhaps more obvious way of reflecting our own family l..."

Jeffrey, spot on. I think we all felt that David is truly poignant in his observations, and often hits the mark perhaps a little too well. On an (even more) personal level, the characters reminded me of my childhood. My mom is an artist, and dad is an engineer. I came more after my mom, and we would endlessly chat about art and be quite unconventional together, while Dad I think often felt left out. I probably express some of this more cogently in my review - if you have nothing better to do, do check it out. Cheers, Mark


message 43: by sue (new) - added it

sue Oh after reading all these comments, I really need to bump this up my list


message 44: by [Name Redacted] (new)

[Name Redacted] Jeffrey wrote: "[Name Redacted] wrote: "Jeffrey wrote: "[Name Redacted] wrote: "Don't know if someone else mentioned this already, but they've actually determined that the "50+%" divorce rate is complete bunk -- i..."

The original stats and subsequent studies have all showed more or less the same thing: that people who get married generally stay married, while those who remarry tend to divorce and remarry frequently thereafter. Obviously this will vary according to one's social circle, state, etc. but the general stats hold. I think it's something to do with people feeling more comfortable with a subsequent divorce once they have a first one under their belts -- it seems less frightening, less like a failure.

However, as the cultural consciousness has internalized the falsely-inflated "over 50%" statistic, it is entirely possible that more people get divorced because they enter into marriages with the (incorrect) assumption that successful marriages are the minority -- why work at something which you believe on some level to be doomed from its inception?

I'm not making any value judgments. I'm just trying to parse the results of the studies.


Jeffrey Keeten Sue1958 wrote: "Oh after reading all these comments, I really need to bump this up my list"

I hope you enjoy the book Sue!


Jeffrey Keeten [Name Redacted] wrote: "Jeffrey wrote: "[Name Redacted] wrote: "Jeffrey wrote: "[Name Redacted] wrote: "Don't know if someone else mentioned this already, but they've actually determined that the "50+%" divorce rate is co..."

There are some studies that show that divorce rates are dropping mainly because of people electing to get married at an older age. Marriages are much more likely to last, it seems, if the couple are 25 years or older. I don't have the means to decide who's statistics are correct, but let me give you some stats that are in my own family and business.

My parents are still together and my brother and I are both still married to our first and only spouse. Good statistics there. I have four cousins on my Dad's side. 2 of the 4 are divorced. Out of my cousins on my mom's side there are 30 of which 25 have married. 12 of them have divorced or 48%. I ran a check on the 98 people who work for the company I am part owner. 72 of them have married. 32 have been divorced. 44% have divorced so below the 50% mark, but still alarmingly high.

It is projected that 25% of the millenniums will never marry. That could be a reaction to their own parents being divorced.

So as you call it the "falsely-inflated 50% statistic", it is actually very real in my life. If it is inflated, it isn't inflated by as much as you wish it to be.

Hey I hope your right, but I wouldn't be too comfortable in that assumption.


message 47: by Steve (new)

Steve In the latest studies I've seen book reviews are sexier than poems 58% of the time. And Jeffrey, I have to believe yours rate higher still. I hope nobody wants to argue my statistics.


message 48: by Cecily (new)

Cecily Steve, are you flirting with Jeffrey?!


message 49: by Jeffrey (last edited Aug 11, 2015 02:38PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Jeffrey Keeten Steve wrote: "In the latest studies I've seen book reviews are sexier than poems 58% of the time. And Jeffrey, I have to believe yours rate higher still. I hope nobody wants to argue my statistics."

Statistically 72% of the time people look sexier while reading my book reviews. Little known fact!


message 50: by Cecily (new)

Cecily ROFL


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