Christopher Lawson's Reviews > The Time Bandit Solution: Recovering Stolen Time You Never Knew You Had

The Time Bandit Solution by Edward G. Brown
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√ Avoid the Energy Vampires

Interruptions, interruptions. They are "bandits" stealing your time everyday. If you let them, a lot of your productivity will go right down the drain. You will have to get your momentum back, figure out where you were, and maybe redo some things. Be sure to call these interruptions what they are--thefts of your time. You can't deal with the bandits effectively if you don't call them what they are.

To counteract these nasty time-wasters, schedule blocks of time that you can work undisturbed. Mr. Brown calls this "Time Locking." Educate your clients and your colleagues, so that they will understand, and not be offended.

It's also important to schedule "Quiet Time." In Hawaii, the author began to understand the important of this time for reflection: "I embraced my need for Quiet Time as a poet embraces a muse."

This book is a lot like an autobiography. The author has lots of stories about his clients, and how he managed their businesses. "So, I my 30's, I simply said to my LA life, 'Enough! I disolved all my partnerships, sold off my assets, said goodbye to my clients - movie stars, athletes, singers, and all." We then hear about the author's encounter with the famous Don Ho, and see the photo of the nicely bronzed author (or is that Don Ho?)

The tone of the book is too much about the author and his successes, and too little about solving the reader's problems. Honestly, who cares about the author's success with Don Ho, or with Roy Rogers? The author strikes me as a nice man, but his personal stories seem oftentimes intrusive.

Besides the time-locking idea, one should embrace an emotional tool-kit, which the author calls, "Focal Locking Martial Arts," with special emphasis on positive affirmation. This is part of a mental hygiene process. For example, Mr. Brown relates a scuba diving incident, in which he was forced to stay in a decompression chamber to prevent the "bends." He relied upon his emotional toolkit to help him cope with that situation.

There are many decent ideas in this book, but you have to wade through a lot of text to get to the essence of the material. As interesting as the stories are, I really wished the principles were more concisely (and more briefly) stated.

√ All in all, an "okay" book, with decent ideas. Ironically, I found it too time-consuming to get to the core message of a book on saving time.

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