Lisa’s review of The Plague > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Jacob (new)

Jacob Overmark Regrettable the meaning of decency is becoming more and more watered out. Quoting from John le Carré, in the Russia House: “Today one must think like a hero to behave like a merely decent human being.” 


message 2: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Jacob wrote: "Regrettable the meaning of decency is becoming more and more watered out. Quoting from John le Carré, in the Russia House: “Today one must think like a hero to behave like a merely decent human bei..."

That is a powerful quote. And sadly, I think you are right. It takes heroism to resist the plagues of stupidity that a raging around the world, forcing too many people to live in plague-like environments, isolated from the rest of humanity. Maybe we have lost a proper sense of what decency means at all?


message 3: by Jacob (new)

Jacob Overmark Lisa wrote: "Jacob wrote: "Regrettable the meaning of decency is becoming more and more watered out. Quoting from John le Carré, in the Russia House: “Today one must think like a hero to behave like a merely de..."

Maybe we have ... When more and more plague ridden rats of all kinds are craving our attention it becomes harder to chose the battles to fight. Where should I begin, 3rd World issues, environment, corrupt politicians, you name it. Some say that the perceived responsibility arising from our access to all of the world by pressing the Enter button is breaking them down. Who are the strong ones who will lead on in battle?


message 4: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Jacob wrote: "Lisa wrote: "Jacob wrote: "Regrettable the meaning of decency is becoming more and more watered out. Quoting from John le Carré, in the Russia House: “Today one must think like a hero to behave lik..."

Yes, there might be some truth in that. When I was a child, we got news twice a day - in the morning newspaper and on the evening television news. Between that, we had time to think, talk, digest, reglect. Now we can get involved in the hopeless mess at all times. I for one feel sickened by it. But I have also changed my approach to environment, politics etc as a result. I speak up more.


message 5: by Jackie (new)

Jackie Ullerich Really powerful review/commentary. Thanks for sharing.


message 6: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Jackie wrote: "Really powerful review/commentary. Thanks for sharing."

Thank you very much for your kind words, Jackie!


message 7: by Jaline (new)

Jaline I love your reviews, Lisa, because they always make me think! Well done! :)


message 8: by Eleanor (new)

Eleanor Great review of a very powerful book. Yes, the plague is always there waiting to strike.


message 9: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Jaline wrote: "I love your reviews, Lisa, because they always make me think! Well done! :)"

Thank you, Jaline! That means a lot to me. I primarily write them to get my own thoughts organised, and to get to the core of why I like or dislike a specific book.


message 10: by Jaline (new)

Jaline Lisa wrote: "Jaline wrote: "I love your reviews, Lisa, because they always make me think! Well done! :)"

Thank you, Jaline! That means a lot to me. I primarily write them to get my own thoughts organised, and to get to the core of why I like or dislike a specific book."


You are welcome - and you do a great job of it! :)


message 11: by Rakhi (new)

Rakhi Dalal Fear is definitely powerful, who can say for sure how he/she might act when faced with such fear. Great review, Lisa!


message 12: by Agnieszka (last edited Jul 24, 2017 12:23AM) (new)

Agnieszka A very good review, Lisa. It is on of these readings that open your eyes, that you feel someone finally said this what you couldn't because of lack accurate words. All your fears there were, and courage and decency you looked for, and warning it's not the end, it may return any day. Powerful novel.


message 13: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Eleanor wrote: "Great review of a very powerful book. Yes, the plague is always there waiting to strike."

Thank you so much, Eleanor! Camus at his best is simply overwhelming.


message 14: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Rakhi wrote: "Fear is definitely powerful, who can say for sure how he/she might act when faced with such fear. Great review, Lisa!"

To me, that is the scariest question of all, having grown up in the shadow of European history. If fascism spread again, what would my actions be? Taking terror into account, there is an uncomfortable question mark.


message 15: by Jay (new)

Jay Green Fantastic review. Thanks, Lisa. A powerful story brilliantly told. Even in translation, Camus' writing is so pure and crystal clear.


message 16: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Agnieszka wrote: "A very good review, Lisa. It is on of these readings that open your eyes, that you feel someone finally said this what you couldn't because of lack accurate words. All your fears there were, and co..."

Yes, well put, Agnieszka! It is so true to life, despite creating an entirely fictional, artificial setting. It is one of the books I return to over and over again.


message 17: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Jay wrote: "Fantastic review. Thanks, Lisa. A powerful story brilliantly told. Even in translation, Camus' writing is so pure and crystal clear."

Thanks, Jay! I agree with you wholeheartedly. Camus works well in translation as well.


message 18: by Michelle (new)

Michelle Curie Such an intriguing review, Lisa; makes me want to read the book!


message 19: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Michelle wrote: "Such an intriguing review, Lisa; makes me want to read the book!"

Thank you, Michelle! I can definitely recommend it - it hasn't lost any of its relevance.


message 20: by Özgür (new)

Özgür Great review. Thanks for sharing.


message 21: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Özgür wrote: "Great review. Thanks for sharing."

Thank you very much for your kind words, Özgur!


message 22: by MihaElla (new)

MihaElla I feel so thoughtfully brainwashed that the first actionable impulse would be to dig deep my head straight into the earth [ostrich driven competition] :-( ... Lisa, can we get some 'feeze' until better answers are in place?


message 23: by Czarny (new)

Czarny Pies I have never been a teacher but I suspect that this novel must still touch the young reader as it reminds them that in life they will face difficult decisions in life.


message 24: by Charlotte (new)

Charlotte One thing that really got to me about this book was that when the town gets quarantined, Camus stops using dates. My professor had once told me that by abandoning dates, Camus not only closes the town to the outside world physically by putting them under quarantine, but he also freezes the town within time as well, not allowing them to move forward with their future.


message 25: by Dimitri (new)

Dimitri Tried this fresh out of high school but the French prose (with that ** verb tense for writing only) threw me off. How much life-under-Vichy/ Nazi knowledge do you need to really 'get' this book ? Cause I come packed with that by now :-)


message 26: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Thanks Lisa - your review reminded me of why I love this novel.


message 27: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Charlotte wrote: "One thing that really got to me about this book was that when the town gets quarantined, Camus stops using dates. My professor had once told me that by abandoning dates, Camus not only closes the t..."

His whole approach to the quarantined psyche is so insightful. The novel can stand for any kind of extreme situation, in which you "fall out of time".


message 28: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Dimitri wrote: "Tried this fresh out of high school but the French prose (with that ** verb tense for writing only) threw me off. How much life-under-Vichy/ Nazi knowledge do you need to really 'get' this book ? C..."

Passé simple :-)
Not sure you need any specific knowledge of that era - it is rather an allegory than a historical account. I think you will love it, Dimitri!


message 29: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Lisa wrote: "Thanks Lisa - your review reminded me of why I love this novel."

Happy we share that love, Lisa!


message 30: by Caterina (new)

Caterina Challenging and powerful review, Lisa. Unfortunately timely. Moved this up in reading priority. la peste réveillerait ses rats et les enverrait mourir dans une cité heureuse .... that's quite a quotation. There's even the sense that the rats are just being used ... the way people can and are being used.


message 31: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Caterina wrote: "Challenging and powerful review, Lisa. Unfortunately timely. Moved this up in reading priority. la peste réveillerait ses rats et les enverrait mourir dans une cité heureuse .... that's quite a quo..."

Yes, exactly! Thanks Caterina!


message 32: by Nocturnalux (last edited May 22, 2019 07:24PM) (new)

Nocturnalux One of the things that I suspect I'd end up doing was punching the priest in the face, very hard, several times, until he stopped being an insufferable excuse for a human being.

Of course, it would not solve anything and it would probably only cause more harm than good but I doubt I'd be able to stop myself. Especially if I were under the strain everyone is under.

That sermon was absolutely horrifying already but going on about 'loving the plague' after witnessing the agony and death of a child...no, just, no. Punch in the face it'd be.


message 33: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Nocturnalux wrote: "One of the things that I suspect I'd end up doing was punching the priest in the face, very hard, several times, until he stopped being an insufferable excuse for a human being.

Of course, it woul..."


Religion is a bizarre deviation of human thought processes. Unfortunately, punch in the facecwould just send the priest down that road even further. Not sure what would help...
I could live with Christian sacrificial lambs if those priests sacrificed themselves in accordance with their beliefs. But usually they outsource the suffering to women, children and poor...


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