Petra X’s review of The Outsider > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Dolors (new)

Dolors You hit the nail on the head with that closing paragrah Miss Bubbles. Not sure Camus was a philospher either, least of all an existentialist, but he sure had guts to "act" accordingly, like opaque Mersault, who was condemned rather for his lack of emotion than for the crime he committed. Fear of the absurd, fear of life, righ?


Erin *Proud Book Hoarder* Well done review, although I'm sorry to say it doesn't look like a book I'd enjoy because of the plotline. Sounds like a less than traditional protagonist for sure, though, which is almost always an interesting thing.


message 3: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks I should reread this; having to read it for school definitely made the book less enjoyable.


message 4: by Kim (new)

Kim I had an early negative reaction to "The Plague" by starting to read it when I was too young to do it justice. I've avoided Camus ever since. Your review encourages me to give him another chance.


message 5: by Petra X (new)

Petra X Dolors wrote: "You hit the nail on the head with that closing paragrah Miss Bubbles. Not sure Camus was a philospher either, least of all an existentialist, but he sure had guts to "act" accordingly, like opaque ..."

Camus was very definitely an existentialist. It is clearly demonstrated in The Plague as well as this book. It's in the perspective of his writing.

Mersault was perhaps the ultimate Zen Buddhist in some ways, nothing mattered, everything was the same to him. Or maybe closer to Kipling's If - the words if not the meaning anyway.

"If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same"

Neurasthenic? Sociopathic? Asperger's? None of the above?


message 6: by Petra X (new)

Petra X Erin (Paperback Stash) wrote: "Well done review, although I'm sorry to say it doesn't look like a book I'd enjoy because of the plotline..."

The book is very enjoyable Erin. It's so beautifully written, like The Plague it would be hard not to enjoy it.


message 7: by Dolors (last edited Jun 02, 2014 01:07PM) (new)

Dolors Ms Bubbles SockieP wrote: "Dolors wrote: "You hit the nail on the head with that closing paragrah Miss Bubbles. Not sure Camus was a philospher either, least of all an existentialist, but he sure had guts to "act" accordingl..."

You might be right, I have only read "The Outsider" so far but I ordered "The Plague", "The fall" and several of his essays after finishing his first novella (?).
Philosopher or not, existentialist or Buddhist, I detected something quite different from Satre's composed, erudite and elaborated discourse. Camus' writing was austere yet it had some inherent lyricism and an urge to stick to life in spite of the absurdity of it. I thought he was trying to be true to himself rather than to expose a theoretical elucidation about essence preceding existence or vice-versa, but I need to read more by him before being sure about my first impressions!


message 8: by Petra X (new)

Petra X At 16, Sartre was a revelation to me. The Roads to Freedom trilogy replaced the Bible and changed my life, or at least the way I thought about it. I never went back!

Camus was more introspective a writer than Sartre I think. Everything is from the first person whether or not it is written that way. Sartre was more a novelist plus. Camus identified himself as being one who resists and who writes (resists much more generally than being in La Resistance alone - which he also was), but said of Sartre that he was a writer first, a writer who resisted. Maybe that is the difference. Philosophy first for one, writing, novels for the other?


message 9: by Dolors (new)

Dolors Sounds quite plausible to me, although I haven't read enough by any of them to back up my first impressions. What fascinates me is how two people with such dissimilar backgrounds could speak the same language, in spite of their open disagreements. But I do agree in defining Camus more as some sort of "pacifist activist" than a novelist.


message 10: by Petra X (new)

Petra X I've just reread this. I obviously didn't even reread what I'd written, let alone edit it. I can't be bothered now... lol. (But I am an existentialist).


message 11: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Great review, Petra. I loved this book as well.


message 12: by Hanneke (last edited Mar 29, 2018 08:41AM) (new)

Hanneke Wonderful, Petra! You said all there is to say about the novel and you said it very well! Did you perhaps read that recent novel of Daoud, where the brother of the murdered man in The Stranger tells the story from the murdered man's point of view. I'll look up the exact name of the author and the title if you would like to know. Really interesting book as well.


message 13: by Petra X (new)

Petra X Hanneke wrote: "Wonderful, Petra! You said all there is to say about the novel and you said it very well! Did you perhaps read that recent novel of Daoud, where the brother of the murdered man in The Stranger tell..."

What's the name of the book please? I would like to read it.


message 14: by Hanneke (new)

Hanneke It is: Kamel Daoud - The Meursault Investigation. I thought it was damn good!


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