LeeAnne’s review of Dept. of Speculation > Likes and Comments

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Florence (Lefty) MacIntosh It sounds like a really tough book to read, but worth it. Loved that quote you pulled LeeAnne, hilarious!


message 2: by [deleted user] (new)

Terrific review, LeeAnne. I love the books that stick in my gut like that.


message 3: by LeeAnne (new)

LeeAnne Yeah, you definitely feel this woman's pain, but it's such a good book.
That quote is the best! Funny, mean but true!


message 4: by LeeAnne (new)

LeeAnne Thank you Derek. Me too. I think that gut feeling comes from the most honest writing.


message 5: by Caroline (new)

Caroline That quotation could not be more true. Actually, it sounds like this book rings true all around. Impressive.


message 6: by LeeAnne (new)

LeeAnne It really does Caroline. It's a very short book, but it's got a lot to say.


message 7: by Michael (new)

Michael Captivating review. So I guess like the reward of the rollercoaster being the blessed return to earth, the pleasure of being "left stunned and dazed" with this book is also being left alive and breathing. Must be quite a read to shake one up like a thriller but be blessed with good writing with situations most could identify with.


message 8: by LeeAnne (last edited May 20, 2014 06:42AM) (new)

LeeAnne Thanks so much Michael! This book has a build up, you know "something" is going to happen. When it does, it's a hard kick in the stomach, emotionally.


message 9: by Carol (new)

Carol Loved your review, LeeAnne! Added the book.


message 10: by LeeAnne (last edited May 20, 2014 06:42AM) (new)

LeeAnne Thank you so much Carol! Ahh! I can't wait to read your review!


message 11: by Chris (new)

Chris I enjoyed your review, LeeAnne. I felt like I could really see what you would experience through this book. It is also why I've concluded that I don't think I'll be reading this book anytime soon.

Does that make me a coward? :-/


message 12: by LeeAnne (new)

LeeAnne Haha! Thanks Chris. Coward? I don't know. I do the exact same thing, so it's ok with me! :D


message 13: by Chris (new)

Chris Oh good. I avoid certain books at certain times because I don't think I'm in the position to a) fully appreciate them or b) handle them. I'm all for inspirational or downright tragic reads, but it has to be at the right time.

It's actually the same reason I haven't jumped on The Goldfinch with everyone else. :-)


message 14: by LeeAnne (last edited May 20, 2014 08:29AM) (new)

LeeAnne I'm the same way. I have to be in the right mood, the right frame of mind, to fully appreciate certain books. Sometimes that means waiting a while until I'm in that place before I go ahead and commit to reading them.


message 15: by Chris (new)

Chris Yay! So, I guess you must have been in the right frame of mind for this one? Hmmm... what frame of mine is that....? lol


message 16: by LeeAnne (new)

LeeAnne Hummmm. An open, receptive frame of mind!

Experiencing someone else’s tragedy, indirectly, through a book or a movie, can be strangely cathartic. I read, in part, to experience (vicariously) all kinds of human experiences and emotions that I may not encounter in my own life. Reading can unlock emotions that lie dormant and can open you up as a person. Suddenly, I am able to understand and empathize with a person who might be very, very different from me. It can be very enlightening.


message 17: by Doug (new)

Doug Bradshaw LeeAnne wrote: "Hummmm. An open, receptive frame of mind!

Experiencing someone else’s tragedy, indirectly, through a book or a movie, can be strangely cathartic. I read, in part, to experience (vicariously) ..."


Yes, one of the main reason for me to read. Walk in other people's shoes. Sounds like one I may enjoy, LeeAnne. Is enjoy the right word? LOL


message 18: by LeeAnne (new)

LeeAnne HAHA! I know!


message 19: by Caroline (new)

Caroline Doug, I just want to say, I think it's fantastic how open-minded you are with all that you read.


message 20: by Chris (new)

Chris I'll second what Caroline said, Doug. But I feel the same about Caroline and LeeAnne. I feel like I can only handle this kind of book once in a while, when I have the 'open' frame of mind you mentioned, LeeAnne.

Mainly, I read for entertainment. I find reading to be so much more fulfilling than (most) movies and TV. In most cases, I'd rather be reading a so-so book than watching 30-minute sitcoms. Because of that, I end up reading a lot of genre fiction that sounds cool or is by an author I know I like.

And so, I tip my hat to all of you brave readers out there. Those of you who can read this kind of novel with any sort of regularity are truly cut from a more dynamic and durable cloth. :-D


message 21: by Caroline (new)

Caroline Chris wrote: " I find reading to be so much more fulfilling than (most) movies and TV."

Truth x100

I watch very little t.v.--maybe an hour a day, if that and some days none at all. When I don't watch it I don't miss it, and the one hour I watch is fully satisfying. Books are so much more interesting.


message 22: by LeeAnne (last edited May 26, 2014 08:38AM) (new)

LeeAnne I love movies & television. I think I'm very hardwired for visuals. I love visual art. A picture is worth a 1000 words, etc...

I prefer screen adaptations for fantasy genres. It's hard for me to get excited about a text description of a dragon. But when I see believable special effects that show a realistic looking dragon on screen, I am very, very impressed. There it is! There's a skill and art to that. Think of James Cameron's Avatar. A text version of Avatar? Meh.

Having said that, I love that books allow a reader to get into a character's head, understand their motives, feelings, thoughts, etc... Also, there's no bad acting, no shoddy special effects in a book. :)


message 23: by Caroline (last edited May 26, 2014 08:45AM) (new)

Caroline LeeAnne wrote: "I love movies & television. I think I'm very hardwired for visuals. I love visual art. A picture is worth a 1000 words, etc...

I prefer screen adaptations for fantasy genres. It's hard for me..."


Did you prefer the Harry Potter movies to the books? The movies are total eye candy, but they can't compare to Rowling's vivid descriptions. (Obviously: my opinion)


message 24: by LeeAnne (last edited May 26, 2014 09:21AM) (new)

LeeAnne I do prefer the movies but even after the second Potter movie, I grew bored and have not seen the other movies. :( I'm not a huge Lord of the Rings fan either so it might be an aversion to fantasy on my part. I do LOVE HBO's Game of Thrones. :)


message 25: by Doug (new)

Doug Bradshaw LeeAnne wrote: "I love movies & television. I think I'm very hardwired for visuals. I love visual art. A picture is worth a 1000 words, etc...

I prefer screen adaptations for fantasy genres. It's hard for me..."


I like them all as well. One of the reasons I read less than I'd like to, is that Gigi feels left out when I'm reading and so I end up watching some things on TV I wouldn't necessarily have watched. Now and then, movie adaptations are better than the book. Like Chris, I read to escape and enjoy myself. It can be easier to watch a mediocre movie than read a book that isn't talking to you. On the other hand, now and then I'll be so captivated by a book that I lose all track of time.

Avatar is a great example of a movie sometimes conveying more than a book. The books I'm finishing up right now, The Magicians, is an interesting mixture of fantasy and character study, the character study really more important than the settings. I think you might like them, LeeAnne, because you loved The Goldfinch so much. Some of the character themes are very similar, an intelligent girl getting lost in the bizarre world of street magic so similar to drug and alcohol addiction. It's so clever. Hiding from the real world to pursue what your heart wants even though to the rest of the world, you are a nutcase.

I almost have to force myself to go outside of escape type stories to read non-fiction. But normally, I'm always glad I did. That said, the next book i'll read will be even fluffier than normal.


message 26: by LeeAnne (new)

LeeAnne The Magicians is on my to read list! If I'm not mistaken, I think it has been compared to Donna Tartt's first book, The Secret History. I'm definitely planning to read it.

When watching a great TV series or movie with friends & family, and there is a particularly well executed scene or plot twist, it's great fun to share that collective reaction in the room with everyone.


message 27: by Doug (new)

Doug Bradshaw LeeAnne wrote: "The Magicians is on my to read list! If I'm not mistaken, I think it has been compared to Donna Tartt's first book, The Secret History. I'm definitely planning to read it.

When watching a great T..."


Very much so. Our sons sometimes join us watching an episode using our Slingbox and then we text things like "whoa" "excellent" amazing, hilarious, etc. Actually kind of what we're trying to do here on this blog, isn't it?


message 28: by Chris (new)

Chris Going back to Caroline's comment about Rowling's Harry Potter books versus the Movies. I distinctly remember how excited I was to watch the first movie. I had read all the novels and was about to burst as I walked into the theater to see "The Sorcerer's Stone" on the big screen.

What a let down. I was disappointed on about every side. The on screen Harry was so different than my imagination's Harry. And then there was so much that was missed, re-written or glazed over.

Being a little older now, I understand that it is nearly impossible to make a film that encompasses everything conveyed in a novel. The most recent attempt that I thought did a decent job was the film adaptation of Ender's Game (a personal favorite sci-fi novel of mine). I thought it told the story and the acting accurately portrayed the charters as they were presented in the novel. It also had Harrison Ford and, well, I'm just a big sucker for Harrison Ford. :-P

That being said, LeeAnne, I find the Game of Thrones HBO series is a very entertaining show. To borrow, Caroline's words, it's great eye-candy for someone who's read the books and a great story for someone who hasn't.

If I had to pick one or the other, however, I would take Martin's novels over the HBO series every time. The series, due to the restraints of budget and logistics, simply cannot convey every bit of story, character, back story, plot, foreshadowing and every other device employed by Martin over the course of his novels.

Of course that is all in my humble opinion. Sorry if any of that came off sounding a bit pedantic. :-/


message 29: by LeeAnne (last edited May 26, 2014 07:12PM) (new)

LeeAnne Doug wrote: "Actually kind of what we're trying to do here on this blog, isn't it? ."

It really is! I love that part of it.

Chris, I have read the first two Game of Thrones books (after I saw the TV show). I loved both the books & TV show! The books helped me enjoy the show more and vice versa. My husband had to trick me into to watching the TV series. He purposely did not tell me about the dragons because I tend to shy away from pure fantasy genres. I surprised myself by how much I love Game of Thrones. It turns out, I love the dragons too. I think they are incredibly well done.


message 30: by Chris (new)

Chris LeeAnne wrote: "It turns out, I love the dragons too. I think they are incredibly well done."

I think that is what it all comes down to, LeeAnne. Whether you're talking about a book, movie or TV show, there are all different levels of quality. I bet if you read a few quality fantasy novels (even high fantasy), you'd be hooked.

I also believe one of the reasons the Game of Thrones HBO series has done so well, is because George R.R. Martin is a big part of the process. Having him directly involved in how the episodes are written, what changes away from the books take place, and the overall look and feel, all make a huge difference, I think. It gives the series a much more involved feel and less of a Hollywood "inspired by the novels..." presentation.


message 31: by Doug (new)

Doug Bradshaw The other guy who is heavily involved with Game of Thrones is David Benioff He wrote a book I absolutely loved, City of Thieves He is a clever guy and is married to Amanda Pete.


message 32: by LeeAnne (new)

LeeAnne City of Thieves is on my to read list!


message 33: by Doug (new)

Doug Bradshaw I'm already looking forward to your review.


message 34: by s.penkevich (new)

s.penkevich Wonderful review. You really embody the essence of this novel's heart.


message 35: by LeeAnne (new)

LeeAnne Wow! Thank you S.Penkevich!


message 36: by Debbie (new)

Debbie Beauteous review, LeeAnne!! I've been dying to move this one up in my queue and now I have to! I didn't know what it was about until I read your review. It felt like you gave the gist (and emotion) of the story without giving away any spoilers. Thank you!


message 37: by LeeAnne (new)

LeeAnne Thank you so much Debbie! Coming from you, that's a huge compliment!


message 38: by Betsy (new)

Betsy Robinson I feel the same.


message 39: by LeeAnne (new)

LeeAnne Thank you Betsy! :)


message 40: by Danny (new)

Danny I love this book. So many good sentences.


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