Carmen’s review of Dracula > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Arminius (new)

Arminius Lol.


message 2: by Carmen (new)

Carmen LOL!


message 3: by Debbie (new)

Debbie Zapata Stunning review, Carmen! I read this one many many years ago, I do believe I need to read it again.


message 4: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Thank you so much, Debbie!!! I was so excited reading this! As you can probably tell from my review. :) LOL


message 5: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Terrific review Carmen! I read it as a teenager and absolutely loved it. you've made me want to reread it. I used to be mad at Mina but then I realised There are traces of the modern woman in her :)


message 6: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Thank you, Carmen! Yes! There are traces of the modern woman in her! We have hope! :) ;)


message 7: by Andy (new)

Andy A great read & one of the few books Ive re-read over the years. Gary Oldman as Dracula captures Bram Stokers book perfectly I believe & is one of my favs films of the genre. havent read ALL yer review yet but Im with yer so far :D


message 8: by Carmen (new)

Carmen It was wonderful, Andy! I'm sure to re-read it. I never say the Oldman Dracula! Perhaps I should rent it.

LOL I know my review is a bit long, but I had so much to say! :)


message 9: by Andy (new)

Andy Carmen wrote: "It was wonderful, Andy! I'm sure to re-read it. I never say the Oldman Dracula! Perhaps I should rent it.

LOL I know my review is a bit long, but I had so much to say! :)"


Yes so unlike you, normally such a shy bairn... lols

Yes defo watch the Oldman Dracula opposite Anthony Hopkins Van Helsing, is a spot-on adaption of the book, has Tom Waits in it too if I recollect right!


message 10: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Oh, great! Anthony Hopkins is a win.

And I am a shy bairn. :) ;)


message 11: by Donna (new)

Donna Fantastic review, Carmen! Thanks so much for covering all the bases here for someone who's classic-phobic like me. I've been wondering about this book for a while, and now I know what to expect in all different areas, everything from the language used to the amount of gore. I might have to read some of it with my eyes closed, but I can do that. I'm finally adding it to my lists of books to read. :)


message 12: by Evgeny (new)

Evgeny Nice review.

What was surprising to the during my first read is the fact that the book written in 19th century still has scary moments. Dracula as a vampire beats the crap out of the majority of modern depictions of them.


message 13: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Thanks, Donna!

Oh, that's great that you might venture to open a classic. Avoid stuff like Jane Austen and Robert Louis Stevenson. Just a hint.

I used to be a classics-phobe myself! But now I have discovered so many fun ones that I can't say that about myself anymore! :)

There is a bit of gore. But nothing like modern novels. Um, I don't know what your gore-levels are.


message 14: by Carmen (new)

Carmen *Don't get me wrong, I love Austen's novels. But I'd be lying if I told you they were an easy read! o.O


message 15: by Evgeny (new)

Evgeny Carmen wrote: "Thanks, Donna!

Oh, that's great that you might venture to open a classic. Avoid stuff like Jane Austen and Robert Louis Stevenson. Just a hint.

I used to be a classics-phobe myself! But now I hav..."


But... But... I like R.L. Stevenson :(


message 16: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Evgeny wrote: "Nice review.

What was surprising to the during my first read is the fact that the book written in 19th century still has scary moments. Dracula as a vampire beats the crap out of the majority of ..."


Yes, I agree, Evgeny! There's a lot to love about this book. I was most creeped-out by the "killing the undead" parts. And by Renfield. He was creepy.


message 17: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer Awesome Carmen. I read this like you oh so long ago. I was in high school.


message 18: by Donna (new)

Donna Well, I've read a number of classics, but I always resist reading them because I'm worried I won't understand them or that they'll be dull. So I appreciate your thorough review, Carmen. :) And I don't know what my gore level is, either. But I always know when I've reached it. :)


message 19: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Jennifer wrote: "Awesome Carmen. I read this like you oh so long ago. I was in high school."

Thank you, Jennifer! I seem to have a vague memory of reading this ages and ages ago as well. But I'm not sure if I trust this memory. The book was jarring zero memories while reading it, so...


message 20: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Donna wrote: "Well, I've read a number of classics, but I always resist reading them because I'm worried I won't understand them or that they'll be dull. So I appreciate your thorough review, Carmen. :) And I do..."

LOL I thought the staking of vampires in their coffins were the most gruesome, and even then, it's not very detailed. At least, IMO. But I was getting grossed-out.


message 21: by Donna (new)

Donna I can handle a certain amount of being grossed out from years of reading Stephen King. Actually, the possible anti-Semitic portions might give me more problems than the gore. But I like how you mentioned the interactions between all the characters such as the camaraderie with the men. I'm very interested to read this now. :)


message 22: by Carmen (last edited Oct 13, 2015 07:35AM) (new)

Carmen IMO, there are no anti-Semitic sections. None, zero, zilch, nada.

The "anti-Semitic Dracula theory" is the theory that Dracula represents a Jewish man (he's not ever referenced as Jewish and there's no commentary at all supporting the fact that he's Jewish in the novel) coming to England and polluting their soil and their "pure" bloodlines. It's pure horseshit in my opinion - but like I said, people can bring whatever pet theories they want and by twisting and tasting write a dissertation on Dracula purporting anything on earth.

So, don't worry about anti-Semitism in the novel. IMHO it's a bunch of crap.


message 23: by Donna (new)

Donna Okay, thanks, Carmen. That's good to know. I couldn't handle the anti-Semitic parts of Oliver Twist, so I had to stop reading that book. And that's true how people can twist anything to mean something it wasn't intended to mean. It's interesting to see how people's sore points and experiences affect their views.


message 24: by Carmen (last edited Oct 13, 2015 08:13AM) (new)

Carmen It's interesting to see how people's sore points and experiences affect their views.

EVERYBODY has their pet theories about Dracula, it seems. I've been wandering around the Internet and you would not BELIEVE the stuff people conjure up about Dracula. o.O It's a very popular thesis topic, apparently. There's some very bizarre theories out there. The Anti-Semitic one is just the tip of the iceberg! I've heard everything from polyandry, to Stoker making Van Helsing Dutch because he visited Pennsylvania, to masturbatory themes in the novel (?), to he-hates-gays to he-secretly-is-gay-and-Dracula-is-a-gay-positive-novel, to Lucy and Mina being lesbian (I have no idea where they get that one from), to Jack the Ripper inspiring the novel, to the staking of (view spoiler) as a symbolic gang-rape, to environmental and animal-rights themes in the novel... there's no end to it. Some of it seems to be pure conjecture.

Then again, you can see how I got proto-feminism and pro-Catholic sentiment out of it! :D So I'm just as guilty. Pot calling the kettle black, here. :D


message 25: by Evgeny (new)

Evgeny Carmen wrote: " It's interesting to see how people's sore points and experiences affect their views.

EVERYBODY has their pet theories about Dracula, it seems. I've been wandering around the Internet and you wou..."


Looks like some people do not know how to just enjoy a good book.


message 26: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Evgeny wrote: "Carmen wrote: " It's interesting to see how people's sore points and experiences affect their views.

EVERYBODY has their pet theories about Dracula, it seems. I've been wandering around the Inter..."


LOL Well, if you have to write an English paper... I can think of worse source material. ;)


message 27: by Carmen (new)

Carmen OH! And I forgot about a really, really weird one: that Stoker secretly wanted to murder young women. o.O I think that is completely off-base. I was actually kind of upset when I read that one.


message 28: by Evgeny (last edited Oct 14, 2015 06:02PM) (new)

Evgeny Carmen wrote: "OH! And I forgot about a really, really weird one: that Stoker secretly wanted to murder young women. o.O I think that is completely off-base. I was actually kind of upset when I read that one."

Continuing the logic you presented above, any writer of any sex whose work depicts a death of a woman for whatever reason, wanted to murder one. Sure.


message 29: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Oh, that really grated my cheese! I can't believe someone would automatically accuse Stoker of being a repressed serial killer because he wrote Dracula! Argh!


message 30: by Lily (new)

Lily Fantastic review! Very funny and informative. :)


message 31: by Licha (new)

Licha Great review, Carmen. You had me laughing through some parts of it. I enjoyed reading this book but i don't know that I looked at is as deeply as you did, so I really enjoyed reading your review of it.


message 32: by Kandice (new)

Kandice You are such a great reviewer! And a crack up to boot. ;)


message 33: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Lily wrote: "Fantastic review! Very funny and informative. :)"

Thank you so much, Lily!


message 34: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Licha wrote: "Great review, Carmen. You had me laughing through some parts of it. I enjoyed reading this book but i don't know that I looked at is as deeply as you did, so I really enjoyed reading your review of..."

Thank you, Licha! Glad I could give you a laugh! :D


message 35: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Kandice wrote: "You are such a great reviewer! And a crack up to boot. ;)"

Aw, you are so sweet, Kandice! Thank you!


Mia (Parentheses Enthusiast) Love this review! And your status updates were really interesting to read. Also I LOVE this quote: "I sometimes think we must be all mad and that we shall wake to sanity in strait-waistcoats."


message 37: by Alejandro (new)

Alejandro Bloody good review, Carmen ;)


message 38: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Mia wrote: "Love this review! And your status updates were really interesting to read. Also I LOVE this quote: "I sometimes think we must be all mad and that we shall wake to sanity in strait-waistcoats.""

That is a great quote! And thank you so much! :)


message 39: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Alejandro wrote: "Bloody good review, Carmen ;)"

Jajaja, I see what you did there, Alejandro! ;) Clever!


message 40: by Eric (new)

Eric Plume Great review, Carmen! This is probably my favorite classic novel...glad you liked it!

I know you might disagree, but I've always found Dracula to be one of the better depictions of women in fiction, and the reason is simple; variety. There's a lot of different takes on femininity...we have innocent, wantonly sexual, intelligent, silly, etc.

Granted, its all filtered through a 19th century man's opinion on womanhood, but time and place is a thing. But still, the variety on display makes it cool in my book. I mean let's be frank; one of the biggest problems with even 21st century media is simply that there aren't enough female characters, in any one story or even in general. A 19th century author who could give you women you liked and others you didn't in the same book?

Yeah, that's edgy even today. Say what you want about Dracula and Stoker's opinions on women, at least he didn't skimp on the numbers...there are lots of female characters to discuss.

PS: Also, I say Mina Harker is one of the first pulp-novel heroine who is worth a damn. (Note: Dracula was in fact considered "pulp fiction" when it came out...it was basically the bodice-ripper of its day.)


message 41: by Willow (last edited Oct 13, 2015 10:57PM) (new)

Willow Yay! Excellent awesome review! You have me remembering some of the reasons why I loved this book. I did think Van Helsing was a badass in this, and it's true that Dracula is certainly not as charismatic in the book as he is on film. At some time you might want to read Stephen King's Danse Macabre, and read his thoughts on 'Dracula.' He openly admits to following Dracula to a point when he wrote 'Salem's Lot'.

It's interesting what you say about the pro-Catholicism. I never really thought about that. How cool! I always thought Stoker added so much about the crucifix and the host because he was trying to capture every bit of vampire lore that he could. That's actually one of the reasons I love this book so much, because Stoker really did his research. He brings up everything from placing roses in the grave to the blue flame in the beginning of the book. It adds so much atmosphere.

Anyway, I think if you enjoyed this book, you may also enjoy Carmilla. It's a lovely creepy book, and I believe La Fanu was a better writer than Stoker in some ways. Unlike 'Dracula' where the underlining premise is that 'sex will kill you,' Camilla is much more subtle and there is a definite lesbian vibe to it.

By the way, isn't it funny that 'Twilight' has the same 'sex will kill you' kind of premise. Obviously that underlining idea is still as popular now as it was a hundred years ago. lol


message 42: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Eric wrote: "Great review, Carmen! This is probably my favorite classic novel...glad you liked it!

I know you might disagree, but I've always found Dracula to be one of the better depictions of women in fictio..."


Wow, Eric! I loved your comment. It's funny how a "bodice-ripper" of the past can become a classic of the future!

I ended up liking Mina and Lucy, for sure, but I don't really see a plethora of women in this. I mean, you could say virgin (Lucy), mother (Mina, who's married and mothers all the men), and hag (old Mrs. Westenra), but there were not that many female personalities to deal with - only Lucy and Mina, really. Mrs. Westenra was barely a character.

And as for different personalities, while I think Lucy and Mina were successfully portrayed as different people (Lucy is a bit younger, a bit more enthusiastic, a bit richer, and more sexual than Mina), I don't think they represented two different types of women. They were both pretty similar in a lot of ways.

Just saying.

BUT you are absolutely right that both Lucy and Mina are MCs and have a great deal to do with the plot, and I thought Stoker's handling of Mina was great and nigh revolutionary for his time. So there's that. :)

I always wanted to know about the Brides. What were their stories!? What were they up to?! I think sequels dealing with the Brides would be super-fun to read. Not by Stoker, obvio, he's dead.


message 43: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Willow wrote: "Yay! Excellent awesome review! You have me remembering some of the reasons why I loved this book. I did think Van Helsing was a badass in this, and it's true that Dracula is certainly not as charis..."

Thank you so much, Willow!

I read 'Salem's Lot - I wonder if it might look a bit different to me now after reading Dracula.

I'll have to check out Carmilla! And of course you are right about Twilight. Vampires are still standing in as representation of the evils and dangers of sex! :)


message 44: by F.R. (new)

F.R. Fantastic review!
It makes me want to pick up the book again and read it quickly, but expertly, with your points in mind.


message 45: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Awww, thank you so much, F.R. You are sweet to say so. :)


message 46: by Willow (new)

Willow Carmen wrote: I read 'Salem's Lot - I wonder if it might look a bit different to me now after reading Dracula."

One of the things King talked about was the 'fear of sex' premise in 'Dracula'. He felt Stoker, being a Victorian, was probably oblivious to his own theme and if he had known and been conscience of it, he wouldn't have been able to write a book like 'Dracula'. Consequently, King decided that he when he wrote 'Salem's Lot', he would leave out all the sexual tidbits altogether. After all, the people in the 70s were no longer afraid of sex. I almost wonder though if by leaving this out, King took away a huge part of the appeal. I believe Stephenie Myers was oblivious to her own underlining theme as well.


message 47: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Yes, you're right - I found King's vampires to be very non-sexual. But I thought the book was excellent, and I preferred it that way to the way of "vampires are so sexy!" which I don't really like.

Erotic bloodsucking turns my stomach.


message 48: by Libby (new)

Libby Fascinating review Carmen. Loved your analysis of the characters and the vocabulary list!


message 49: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Thank you, Libby! :)


message 50: by mark (new)

mark monday oh my God, Carmen, this is one of the most epic reviews I've ever read!


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