Angelica’s review of Turtles All the Way Down > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Cami (new)

Cami Oh definitely!


message 2: by Tatyana (new)

Tatyana John green!!! Side note: DAVID tenant!!!!!!!!


message 3: by Mary Grace (new)

Mary Grace Nakao Am I the only one who find this absolutely hilarious?? I literally burst out laughing when I saw this XD


message 4: by Sarah (new)

Sarah I died laughing when I saw this.


message 5: by Nikki (new)

Nikki I completely agree with everything you just said.


message 6: by Lily (new)

Lily What is it called?!


message 7: by Kiersten (new)

Kiersten wait there's a title? What is the title?


message 8: by Camila (new)

Camila THE TITLE!! WHAT'S THE TITLE??!!


message 9: by Juan (new)

Juan Esteban Whats the Title?


message 10: by Angie (new)

Angie Lovegood It's a philosophy joke. It's used to like rebut the existence of god. so I'm guessing the main character will be questioning life and god in the novel. I'm so excited.


message 11: by Rachael (new)

Rachael It sounds like something to do with Yertle the Turtle or the way that the world rides through the universe on the back of four elephants on the back of a turtle. To me, anyway.


message 12: by Carrie (new)

Carrie LOL! Love it


message 13: by Camille (new)

Camille now there's a cover ;)


message 14: by Megan (new)

Megan I'm glad I'm not the only one who thought of Yertle the Turtle! 😂


message 15: by Rob (new)

Rob I'm currently reading "The Truth About Stories: A Native Narrative" by Thomas King. He starts every chapter with a Native American story about how the Earth sits upon a giant turtle, and below that is another turtle and below that another turtle. "It's turtles all the way down." He literally says that in every chapter so far. So I'm hoping there's some Native American mythology in this book, but I'm guessing Angie Lovegood is correct in her assumptions.


message 16: by Don (new)

Don Lawson So,the title's a reference to Hindu cosmology, as referenced by Stephen Hawking in "A Brief Histroy of Time": A scientist once gave a lecture on astronomy. He described how the earth orbits around the sun, etc. At the end, a little old lady got up and said: "Rubbish. The world is really flat, supported on the back of a giant tortoise." The scientist replied, "And what is the tortoise standing on?" "Why," said the old lady, "it's turtles all the way down!"


message 17: by Ifa (new)

Ifa Inziati Great review! I agree with you at the focus part. I thought the mystery was going to more compelling but instead it was suddenly about the mental illness and honestly it makes me forget there was mystery at all.


message 18: by Angelica (new)

Angelica Ifa wrote: "Great review! I agree with you at the focus part. I thought the mystery was going to more compelling but instead it was suddenly about the mental illness and honestly it makes me forget there was m..."


If he had turned it into two different books it would have been better because on their own the two were pretty good ideas. The failure was in trying to tie them together. And thanks!


message 19: by Jill (new)

Jill IS Aza white though? She certainly may be. But I was picturing her as being some kind of Hebrew or middle-eastern descent, specifically on her dad's side. I saw her with a light tan skin and curly brown hair. This could very well be incorrect, but the book never did contradict my mental picture. It never mentioned her skin color or hair color as far as I noticed. It does mention that she has brown eyes and is skinny. That's pretty much it. The rest was left up to our imagination.


message 20: by Angelica (new)

Angelica Jill wrote: "IS Aza white though? She certainly may be. But I was picturing her as being some kind of Hebrew or middle-eastern descent, specifically on her dad's side. I saw her with a light tan skin and curly ..."

Well, while her skin is never described, I am fairly sure that if she had been anything else but white that would have been stated, just like it was stated for Daisy. Also, her last name, Holmes, is English/Scottish, not middle eastern. But, if that is the way you imagined her then more power to you. Also, I am not hating on her being white, if that's what you thought, I am just saying that that's what John Green usually writes, again, not that I necessarily have a problem with it.


message 21: by Josephine (new)

Josephine (biblioseph) This gives me hope! I liked The Fault in Our Stars more than you did, but have been a bit disillusioned since then. So, I didn't preorder this. All that said, your review makes me think that I will be able to get this at the library in a few months and have a fairly good time. Thanks for that.


message 22: by Angelica (new)

Angelica Josephine wrote: "This gives me hope! I liked The Fault in Our Stars more than you did, but have been a bit disillusioned since then. So, I didn't preorder this. All that said, your review makes me think that I will..."

Sure thing! I really hope you like it once you get to it!!


message 23: by erin (new)

erin I'm reading it now - I like it way more than I expected to! That being said, I totally agree that it's a little too much in one book.

Also, Davis annoys the hell out of me. I hope he gets better later on in the book, because his story if interesting!


message 24: by Angelica (new)

Angelica Ryn wrote: "I'm reading it now - I like it way more than I expected to! That being said, I totally agree that it's a little too much in one book.

Also, Davis annoys the hell out of me. I hope he gets better ..."


I'm glad you are liking it! I hope Davis grows! He wasn;t my favorite character but he was likable enough I suppose.


message 25: by Cathy (new)

Cathy I am finding it hard to get into this book and this is my second book after ‘fault in our stars’ by John Green.

While I am tempted to put it down thus far, I am persevering. I can see the benefits in this book as it would be fabulous to recommend to YA’s with anxiety so they have someone to connect to and for adults like me who have anxiety who never really thought how it affects other people especially those who don’t understand or have never dealt with it and are oblivious to it.

I do hope it gets better due to the many high ratings people have given it, but I do find it rather depressing when I am dealing with my own turmoils.


message 26: by Angelica (new)

Angelica Cathy wrote: "I am finding it hard to get into this book and this is my second book after ‘fault in our stars’ by John Green.

While I am tempted to put it down thus far, I am persevering. I can see the benefit..."


Maybe it's best to put it down for a while and come back to it later. While it does give a good look into anxiety and what it's like to deal with OCD it's possible that the story might not be for you. I hope you like it if you do find yourself getting through it! Don't pressure yourself to continue it at this time though, if you don't feel up to it.


message 27: by [deleted user] (new)

"Two straight white teenagers" Ever read An Abundance of Katherines? Second main character is an Arab Muslim How about Will Grayson Will Grayson? both characters are gay one written by John Green the other by famous LGBT Young Adult novelist David Levithan that just seemed a really biased statement like you haven't really read his work... Other than that yeah I agree with your review.


message 28: by Angelica (new)

Angelica Shannon wrote: ""Two straight white teenagers" Ever read An Abundance of Katherines? Second main character is an Arab Muslim How about Will Grayson Will Grayson? both characters are gay one written by John Green t..."

Sorry, if that seemed offensive in some way but all of the works I have read, or tried to read by him, TFiOS, Paper Towns, Looking for Alaska, and now TATWD, have pretty much been that way. I wrote this based on my experiences, and it seems like that's 4/6. I haven't read Will Grayson Will Grayson or an Abundance of Katherines, if I had, I might have a different opinion. Thank you for brining those two to my attention. I will change that on the post.


message 29: by Hiba (last edited Oct 25, 2017 07:01AM) (new)

Hiba Idk why but John Green's books feels as if he's trying wayyy wayyyy too hard. Great review, btw :)


message 30: by Josephine (new)

Josephine (biblioseph) Hiba wrote: "Idk why but John Green's books feels as if he's trying wayyy wayyyy too hard. Great review, btw :)"

Bruh, I have the same feeling! I liked TFIOS, but I felt that so acutely!


message 31: by Angelica (new)

Angelica Hiba wrote: "Idk why but John Green's books feels as if he's trying wayyy wayyyy too hard. Great review, btw :)"

Thanks! And that's exactly what I feel! He is putting so much effort on being deep and philosophical that it just comes across as a bit pretentious. At least in my opinion.


message 32: by Agus (new)

Agus great review! it sounds honest, I agree in most of the things you wrote! John has OCD, that's why he could portrait mental illness so real. dftba :)


message 33: by Mashal (new)

Mashal Ahmad I read it. and I honestly think that's the beauty of it to comtemplate the illness and mystry in the same plot. It gave variant to his writings I guess or it'd have been outrageously obsessive.


message 34: by Mason (new)

Mason Barge Paper Towns was good. Moral: Don't EVER see the movie first.


message 35: by Alison (new)

Alison Kraciun I agree with when you said "the book was trying too hard." In my review I had said something along the lines that it was too much for me at some parts. I totally understand what youre saying because I felt the same about having my thoughts not fully be clear or answered when reading. The part that could have some work is the fact that it needs to focus on one topic than going back and forth between different problems of the characters. Aza has a mental illness but Davis has a missing father which begins to confuse readers as well as myself. I feel as if this book was good at raw topics but not a very clear time line.


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