Grace Tjan’s review of Jane Eyre > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Dini (new)

Dini *gasp in horror* You have not read this? What would Ayu say? ;P


message 2: by Grace Tjan (new)

Grace Tjan Yes, I'm a Jane Eyre virgin, believe it or not. :D


message 3: by Dini (new)

Dini Awesome, isn't it? ;)

Again, that St. John guy. Yuck.


message 4: by Grace Tjan (new)

Grace Tjan Dini wrote: "Awesome, isn't it? ;)

Again, that St. John guy. Yuck."


Yes. It's awesome. Mr. Rochester and Jane is just so HOT! *fans self* And I love how Jane is so conflicted yet chooses the right path anyway.

That St. John guy is creepy, and he almost got Jane by appealing to her strong sense of duty. But fortunately she heard that telepathic (?) message just in time to save her.




message 5: by Dini (new)

Dini I love Jane too. This is my favorite quote from her:
"I can live alone, if self-respect, and circumstances require me so to do. I need not sell my soul to buy bliss. I have an inward treasure born with me, which can keep me alive if all extraneous delights should be withheld, or offered only at a price I cannot afford to give."


message 6: by Grace Tjan (last edited Sep 06, 2009 10:29PM) (new)

Grace Tjan Dini wrote: "I love Jane too. This is my favorite quote from her:
"I can live alone, if self-respect, and circumstances require me so to do. I need not sell my soul to buy bliss. I have an inward treasure born ..."


That's a wonderful quote that captures Jane's character very well. And the interesting thing is that it is not Jane herself who says it, but Mr. Rochester, in his guise as the Gypsy fortune teller. That shows how well he knows her. Fantastic piece of writing.

That Gypsy woman thing is funny. Not only does Mr. Rochester have a fine bass voice, he is also a consummate actor! He is able to fool Blanche Ingram and everyone else in that party.




message 7: by Dini (new)

Dini How weird is it that the lead male in the story likes crossdressing? ;D


message 8: by Grace Tjan (last edited Sep 06, 2009 10:54PM) (new)

Grace Tjan Dini wrote: "How weird is it that the lead male in the story likes crossdressing? ;D"

Hahaha. And he's so convincing too. If only he remembers to remove his ring....

I wonder how ugly he really is? Jane thinks he is ugly, but that's only from her perspective.




The Book Whisperer (aka Boof) I'm so glad you loved this! I just adore this book and Jane and Mr Rochester is one of the greatest love stories ever told imho.


message 10: by Grace Tjan (new)

Grace Tjan Boof wrote: "I'm so glad you loved this! I just adore this book and Jane and Mr Rochester is one of the greatest love stories ever told imho."

Thanks, Boof. Honestly, I didn't expect this to be a five-star read, but I end up liking it a lot. Jane and Mr. Rochester's story is just irresistible. Now I'm going to get the 2006 BBC series. I've been watching clips of it on YouTube and it looks good.



message 11: by Sherien (last edited Sep 07, 2009 06:23AM) (new)

Sherien Im so glad u loved it! Sandy, I think in gramedia PIM masih ada dvd Jane Eyre. It's really a great adaptation although there are some parts in the book which they didnt include in the movie. The actors are perfect. oh, and next, you should read Villette! I need to know what u think!


message 12: by Grace Tjan (last edited Sep 07, 2009 06:41AM) (new)

Grace Tjan Ok, Vilette will be on my TBR list. That Mr. Rochester in the 2006 adaptation is surely NOT ugly ! ;D


message 13: by Rauf (new)

Rauf Baca nggak baca nggak baca nggak baca nggak baca nggak. . .


message 14: by Grace Tjan (new)

Grace Tjan WHRauf wrote: "Baca nggak baca nggak baca nggak baca nggak baca nggak. . ."

Baca dong! Male perspective on this book is needed. ;p



message 15: by Rauf (new)

Rauf Hahaha. Next month tapi ya. Jadwal bulan ini udah padat dan nggak realistis :D


message 16: by Grace Tjan (new)

Grace Tjan WHRauf wrote: "Hahaha. Next month tapi ya. Jadwal bulan ini udah padat dan nggak realistis :D"

Beneran baca bulan depan! BTW, I'm amazed at the list of books that you read each month. Do you even sleep at night? LOL






message 17: by Dini (new)

Dini He reads in his sleep, I tell ya.


message 18: by Ayu (new)

Ayu Palar Yayayay I will do a pom pom dance for you, Sandy :)
It's a very passionate book and written in a great great way. I could read this every year!

And don't we all wanna kiss Mr. Rochester? :D


message 19: by Grace Tjan (last edited Sep 08, 2009 09:15PM) (new)

Grace Tjan *nonton pom-pom dance* :D

Mr. Rochester and Jane are just talking (mostly) but they're so hot! A perfect meeting of mind and spirit. They're just made for each other, aren't they? Well, at least after they got rid of certain obstacles. *must shut up before spoiling this book for WH Rauf*

I'm still dipping into this book from time to time to reread the good parts.

It's amazing that Charlotte could blend such disparate elements such as psychological realism and gothic/supernatural happenings with perfect ease. Not to mention the religion, social commentary (proto-feminism?) and a sort of pantheistic study of nature. I find it fascinating how a book could be both so sensual and so religious at the same time. lol

If you're somewhat familiar with the bible, there are lots of references/ allusions to it, not surprisingly, considering that Charlotte is a vicar's daughter.
Rochester is like Samson in the bible.


message 20: by Ayu (new)

Ayu Palar Rochester like Samson? Really? That is interesting :D

I think the BBC miniseries did well in capturing the essence of the novel, either the sensuality or the religiousity. A must watch :)


message 21: by Grace Tjan (new)

Grace Tjan Ayu wrote: "Rochester like Samson? Really? That is interesting :D

I think the BBC miniseries did well in capturing the essence of the novel, either the sensuality or the religiousity. A must watch :)"


Ayu, If you're curious about how Rochester is like Samson (and how Jane is like Delilah), read the Jane Eyre thread at the Victorians. Let me know what you think. I think it must have been deliberate on Charlotte's part.

I've been watching clips of the Toby Stephens series on UTube. Toby looks like how I imagine Rochester would look like (Timothy Dalton does not). I'll get that to watch on TV.

I've also been watching the 2008 Little Dorrit right now. I don't know how faithful that is to the novel, but it's pretty good too.





message 22: by Ayu (new)

Ayu Palar Timothy Dalton is way too handsome and less cruel :I

I am curious with Little Dorrit also. People said the miniseries are good, even though the novel doesn't really win my heart. Still, Arthur Clennam is gorgeous :)



message 23: by Grace Tjan (new)

Grace Tjan Ayu wrote: "Timothy Dalton is way too handsome and less cruel :I

I am curious with Little Dorrit also. People said the miniseries are good, even though the novel doesn't really win my heart. Still, Arthur C..."


Arthur is...a bit chubbier than Mr. Darcy, but still pretty cuddly. lol

Who is this Blandois guy? He eats up a lot space in the series looking evil and is quite annoying at times. He hasn't done anything really bad until now, just following the protagonists around Italy. I wonder if he has that big a role in the novel.



message 24: by Ayu (new)

Ayu Palar I shouldn't spoil the story, should I? However, Blandois' motive isn't really strong to me :I

There is a scene in the novel when Arthur says goodbye to his love for Pet. A very very wonderful scene. I dunno if it's visualized in the miniseries.


message 25: by Grace Tjan (last edited Sep 08, 2009 09:50PM) (new)

Grace Tjan Ayu wrote: "I shouldn't spoil the story, should I? However, Blandois' motive isn't really strong to me :I

There is a scene in the novel when Arthur says goodbye to his love for Pet. A very very wonderful sc..."


Oh, I hope that we haven't wasted so much time with Blandois if he's not going to do anything important. I have a feeling that's he's going to be like Orlick in GE. A character who is there to provide mystery and menace but without having a particulary strong motive.

Is that when Pet rejected Arthur's proposal? In the series it's a very short scene.







message 26: by Rauf (new)

Rauf --closing his eyes to avoid spoilers as he scrolls down to comment box--

@Sandybanks
I always love to read but I only began to make ambitious monthly reading list since July '09. So don't sound amazed yet 8)

@Dini
Everybody's doing it. I just wanna be popular 8P


message 27: by Ayu (new)

Ayu Palar In the book, Arthur hasn't got a chance to propose Pet! Different, eh?


message 28: by Grace Tjan (new)

Grace Tjan Ayu wrote: "In the book, Arthur hasn't got a chance to propose Pet! Different, eh? "

In the series he proposed to her but is rejected in favor of the painter Gowan. I'm finished with the series. Does Amy Dorrit get the inheritance from Mr. Clennam? Why did Mr. Clennam leave it to her and not to Arthur? The ending is not very clear on that, or maybe I have missed something.




message 29: by Ayu (new)

Ayu Palar The goodbye part in the book is sentimental for that reason. Arthur is rejected before he even says he loves her. Aww, Arthur.

Inheritance from Mr. Clennam the senior? As far as I remember there isn't any part of that in the book, Sandy.


message 30: by Grace Tjan (last edited Sep 11, 2009 08:57AM) (new)

Grace Tjan Ayu wrote: "The goodbye part in the book is sentimental for that reason. Arthur is rejected before he even says he loves her. Aww, Arthur.

Inheritance from Mr. Clennam the senior? As far as I remember there ..."


Not in the book?

In the series, Mr. Clennam Sr. asked Arthur on his deathbed to 'put things right', which turns out to be about the inheritance that he left to Amy Dorrit. He wrote her into his will (that was kept by Mrs. Clennam). Mrs. Clennam instructed her servant Flyntwych (sp.?) to burn it, but he didn't do it, and the will eventually fell into the hands of Blandois.

I don't understand why Mr. Clennam Sr. left the inheritance to Amy Dorrit, whom he had never known. If it is not in the book, it seems strange and unnecessary to add that to the series.

I can lend you the series, if you want. But it's in avi format (can only be watched on a PC or a DVD player that supports avi). It's also on UTube.




message 31: by Rauf (new)

Rauf Arthur Senior didn't appear in the novel. Been dead for years. The money that the Dorrits got was from Will Dorrit's distant relative.


message 32: by Grace Tjan (new)

Grace Tjan WHRauf wrote: "Arthur Senior didn't appear in the novel. Been dead for years. The money that the Dorrits got was from Will Dorrit's distant relative."

Thanks for clearing that up, Rauf. So the series is different from the novel.

In the series, the Dorrits do receive inheritance from a distant relative, but on top of that Amy also receives a legacy from Mr. Clennam Sr.



message 33: by Rauf (new)

Rauf So did Arthur Senior and Mr. Dorrit once crossed path or something? In the series?


message 34: by Grace Tjan (new)

Grace Tjan WHRauf wrote: "So did Arthur Senior and Mr. Dorrit once crossed path or something? In the series?"

In the series, they never met. The only connection between them is Frederick Dorrit, who knew Clennam Sr. when he ran a boarding house for dancing girls (one of them presumably Arthur's mom). I find it odd that Clennam Sr. decided to leave a legacy to the niece of a man that he barely knew. Why not to his son Arthur?



message 35: by Rauf (new)

Rauf Hey. Little Dorrit miniseries won 2 Emmy Awards for Best Miniseries and Direction.


message 36: by Grace Tjan (new)

Grace Tjan Yes, I saw that. I thought that the ending is a bit rushed and confusing in places, but it's pretty good in general.


message 37: by Rauf (new)

Rauf Wow. Andy Serkis played Rigaud? I didn't know that. And of course he'll be starring as Cap'n Haddock in that Tintin film. He'll probably play Milou too 8P


message 38: by Grace Tjan (new)

Grace Tjan Imo, he's a bit hammy. But maybe he's supposed to be an over the top Dickens villain? And he gets too much screen time, considering that his role in the overall plot is not that big. The actor who plays old Mr. Dorrit is very good.


message 39: by Carly (new)

Carly Svamvour I enjoyed this book; but there's something I don't like about the way these ladies put men on a pedestal . . . like they're gods or something.

They seem to need to put their female protags in the position of lowly servant-type creatures who would be only glad to lick the feet of their men.


message 40: by Grace Tjan (new)

Grace Tjan Carly wrote: "I enjoyed this book; but there's something I don't like about the way these ladies put men on a pedestal . . . like they're gods or something.

They seem to need to put their female protags in th..."


But how about the ending, when Mr. Rochester is blinded and thus is brought down a peg from his master status? If he was so masterful before, he can't function without her help now.




message 41: by Hayes (new)

Hayes "Charlotte’s [book] is a spirited, sweeping tango of duty and desire."

Yes, yes... Perfect way of putting it!


message 42: by Grace Tjan (new)

Grace Tjan Hayes wrote: ""Charlotte’s [book] is a spirited, sweeping tango of duty and desire."

Yes, yes... Perfect way of putting it!"


Glad that you like it, Hayes.


message 43: by Dolors (new)

Dolors Wow! Well said and argued, nice review!


message 44: by Magenta (new)

Magenta Can't agree more!


message 45: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia I agree with you Charlotte Bronte really wrote 'Jane Eyre' very well, I can fully visualize the scene


message 46: by Iris (new)

Iris A wonderful, cogent review which makes me want to revisit this masterpiece!


message 47: by Salam (new)

Salam Abu fares I believe Charlotte really did describe every detail and feeling there is without skipping a moment, which is truly well delivered! But that doesn't mean that Jane Austen, with her wit and creative novels and complex human characters that you could relate to, is less passionate.
Yes, I would agree that Charlotte is more detailed, focusing on more than love. as in Jane Eyre she brought up self respect, resisting temptation, defying unfortunate circumstances, friendship, and a love story. I think Austen really described in sarcastic tones the negatives and flaws of the society in between the lines.


message 48: by Hi (new)

Hi Quotes Simply love
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