Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies’s review of Not a Drop to Drink (Not a Drop to Drink, #1) > Likes and Comments

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Rashika (is tired) I don't mind children being used as a plot device as long as they are done in the 'right' way. So many times authors just tend to... mess it up.

I got over my dystopian obsession a while ago so I am not particularly excited to read this book but... I like survival stories and a strong female lead always helps :)

Although what you said about the romance bothers me a little. It seems as though the romance was there only for the sake of it because from what you said, it doesn't make sense. Although you could look at in the bad girl good boy thing, the reverse of the usual YA situations which involve bad boys and good girls.

Awesome review Khanh :)


message 2: by Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies (last edited Oct 04, 2013 01:48AM) (new)

Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies Rashika wrote: "I don't mind children being used as a plot device as long as they are done in the 'right' way. So many times authors just tend to... mess it up.

I got over my dystopian obsession a while ago so I ..."


I think this is my 3rd or 4th dystopian in which the otherwise competent MC adopts a little kid DESPITE THE FACT THAT SHE'S SURVIVAL ORIENTED. It doesn't make any sense! Usually the MCs are so rational, so competent...and the kid is just an albatross around their neck, or otherwise the child acts way too mature to be an even believable child.

Grumpy Khanh is evil. Grumpy Khanh hates kids.


message 3: by Ash Wednesday (last edited Oct 04, 2013 02:35AM) (new)

Ash Wednesday emotional feeeeeeeels and bonding and happy cuddly moments

Never really fits with dystopians I think (which was cleverly circumvented in HG) because I can't really imagine people thinking about that when you're too busy surviving. It's a tricky one.

Also +1 on the spotting the mis-science.

Great review.

Edited to clarify and because I sometimes forget my manners :p


Rashika (is tired) What??? Which other dystopian books have ppl adopting kids? I must avoid them in that case.

I know what you mean. It contradicts the character and then it just gets on your nerves. Kind of like those supposed strong female leads that melt into goo when the love interest steps in :P
(You'll see a pattern soon enough and realize that that is my number one pet peeve :P)


Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies Rashika wrote: "What??? Which other dystopian books have ppl adopting kids? I must avoid them in that case.

I know what you mean. It contradicts the character and then it just gets on your nerves. Kind of like th..."


Off the top of my head, In the After. But a lot of other dystopian and post-apo books have teens taking care of really unrealistic kids too.


Andrea ❤Ninja Bunneh❤ This is one book I was so on the fence about in whether I enjoyed it or not. It's kind of I could live with or without it, didn't matter. Great review Khanh!


message 7: by Jade (new)

Jade McCahon I just wanted to raise a little baby finger here, disregard the rest of this review, and bitch that in fact, I was plunged into a cold bath full of ice and freezing water during a hospital stay for a high fever when I was four years old. Yes, it was cray. But then it was rural Missouri...that might have had something to do with it...hmmmm...


Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies Jade wrote: "I just wanted to raise a little baby finger here, disregard the rest of this review, and bitch that in fact, I was plunged into a cold bath full of ice and freezing water during a hospital stay for..."

Oh, man! It might have been a particularly painful experience if you remember it until now.


Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies JennyJen wrote: "Another dystopian that adds an orphaned kid in for no reason at all? That alone makes me want to take this off my tbr list. I am so sick and tired of that trope."

Me too. So many fucking dystopians features kids who tag along. It boggles my mind.


message 10: by Summer (new)

Summer I don't understand- why does every ya dystopia (in my experience) have to have a shitty romance? Well, at least this one seems better than others.


Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies Summer wrote: "I don't understand- why does every ya dystopia (in my experience) have to have a shitty romance? Well, at least this one seems better than others."

Because writers somehow think their main female reading audience LUUUUURVES ROMANCE IN EVERY BOOK. Sigh. You're right, at least this one was a little less painful than most.


message 12: by Basuhi (new)

Basuhi Is it just me being ignorant or have you written many reviews without me knowing about them, Khanh ?
How do you read so fast ?! Since dystopia is just not my genre, I guess I'll skip this one even thought it seems pretty good.

@ Summer : Romance must be minimized where it isn't necessary. One thing THG excelled in was its portrayal of romance - something that is not all combustibly-consuming but a simple steady warmth.


Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies Basuhi wrote: "Is it just me being ignorant or have you written many reviews without me knowing about them, Khanh ?
How do you read so fast ?! Since dystopia is just not my genre, I guess I'll skip this one even..."


Basuhi, I've written my fair share but I've only really started them seriously this year as practice to keep my writing skills in shape. I read super fast, always have. I started reading when I was 4 and never stopped :)


message 14: by Basuhi (new)

Basuhi That explains it. I started reading 2-3 years back and have started reviewing seriously only since this May ! I've been slogging a book for weeks now :/


message 15: by Kevin (new)

Kevin I 5 starred this, loved it, but your review is AMAZING. Spot on!


Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies Glad you liked it, Kevin. I would have loved this if not for the romance.


message 17: by Leslie (new)

Leslie God, your reviews are amazing! This looks good and so different!! I can only hope for this kind of well executed review...wow.


Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies Thanks so much, Leslie!


message 19: by Ioana (new)

Ioana I'm reading this now and read the start of your review, up until "..more". I'm afraid you're very right, which makes me sad. Start of the book was fabulous, such strong characters, but I can definitely tell Lynn's slipping.


Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies IMO the latter parts of the book redeemed itself =) Read on!


message 21: by Ioana (new)

Ioana I just finished it...my feels!


message 22: by Annabelle (new)

Annabelle Blume Just to nit pick, icing is, in fact, sound medical science when a child is suffering from a febrile seizure.


message 23: by Laurie (new)

Laurie Brumbaugh I know I'm late to this review. I just finished the book. Also just wanted to point out that people in developing countries do indeed use the water purification method described in the book: http://www.sodis.ch/methode/index_EN


Tracy (Cornerfolds) I actually agree with you about Lucy. It's frustrating to see such a badass character adopt a child, completely out of character, because "that's what women do." :/


message 25: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca I'm really late to this particular book and review, but the science here is actually NOT BS. You might want to revise your review or at least write in an edit. The water purification method used in the book is actually what is used in developing countries without access to clean water. Also, plunging a kid into an ice bath is actually an acceptable last resort to stop a febrile seizure...while obviously we don't do it with modern medicine and hospital care, they had limited options and IMMEDIATE lowering of temperature is needed, otherwise there would be brain damage.

The author included some more snippets in more recent editions of the book where she mentions her extensive research into all things water, including the SODIS method of purification (you can look it up yourself). So while you're nitpicking what you see as bad science that supposedly anyone with an understanding of science would recognize as bad science...well, hate to say it, but you might want to do your own research first before you end up looking ridiculous for calling out the author when she's right.


message 26: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Forgot to add that SODIS is short for solar water disinfection, a method recommended by WHO, UNICEF, the Red Cross, etc. The part where you can probably criticize the author on is that chlorination is an easier and probably more effective way of disinfecting water, and since Lynn and Lauren go scavenging things from abandoned houses in the book, it's hard to imagine that they wouldn't have found many gallons of household bleach. A single gallon of bleach would treat quite a bit of water. Also, technically it didn't seem like they had THAT much of a shortage of fuel/ability to boil water. I feel like while Lauren might have remembered SODIS from a National Geographic article (which is how the author learned about it), the average educated person would be more familiar with bleach or boiling, and there's no explanation of why they didn't do either. Boiling that much water was probably unfeasible but still, the author could've pointed that out in a couple of sentences just to explain why they stuck to SODIS...like maybe they did use bleach but ran out or whatever.


message 27: by arielle (new)

arielle This is pointless but yes, you can quickly drop a person's body temp by submerging them in an ice bath. Especially in ill children (Lucy's character didn't have a flu or cold, she had a bacterial infection) it is incredibly important to lower the core body temp to keep the body from causing permanent nerve or brain damage and in the absence of modern medical equipment an icy lake would probably be the only option.


message 28: by arielle (new)

arielle @rebecca, I think she went with UV light instead of boiling because, since UV is technically radiation, it destroys more bacteria than boiling.


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