Mariam’s review of Veil of Roses > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Trish (new)

Trish I, too, was angered by the author's stereotypes -- both of Muslim and American women. I am very religious as well and choose to abstain from many of the same things that Islam rejects -- alcohol, premarital sex, immodesty, etc. I choose to follow these rules because, as you stated, the restrictions protect me and allow me to have a happier life. Thanks for your insightful comment.


message 2: by Kathryn (new)

Kathryn Thanks for your review. It has saved me from reading the book. Trish said everything that I feel so I wont repeat it. :) Thanks for standing up for what you believe!


message 3: by Andrea (new)

Andrea Quinn Great review! Well said, Sister!


message 4: by Ðɑηηɑ (new)

Ðɑηηɑ I wasn't so angered by the writer's stereotypes. It's just make the story better. Besides, it's a story. Unreal story, that's why you shouldn't pay attention, because the only thing it does is, making the plot way more intersting! Remember: you must not take her seriously, and not only becasue she probably never been to Iran. I you want to be offended by fictional stuff, then you're just odd, because its a fucking story. Nothing's real, and readers know it, for the most part!


message 5: by Amara (new)

Amara No, I don't think this reviewer is odd to be offended by a false image of her people or her religion! Fiction or not, nobody likes to have false stereotypes perpetuated.


message 6: by Anna (new)

Anna A great review. I'd have to add that she also forgot to check the map or the history books when placing one of Tami's new friends to come from Czechoslovakia, a country which ceased to exist in 1993. Either that girl was a newcomer, in which case she would have been Czech or Slovakian, or she'd have to have got a US citizenship before the country was split in 1993, in which case.. why was she still with newcomers' English class? The pregnant Russian mail order bride and her d-bag, violent husband seem overly stereotypical...
She should have checked the spelling of hijab in a dictionary. And Tami does not come out as a 27-year old, but rather 14.
Oh, and my biggest annoyance with the story: it would never happen (at least since the 9/11) that anyone with a tourist visa of 90 days would be allowed to enter the US without a return ticket. Even if she would have been from a visa waiver country, she would not have been allowed to enter without the return ticket. Even if she'd been married to a US citizen at that point, she would still not have been allowed to enter without the return ticket (unless she had a fully approved spouse visa at that point).
Other than those, and the guessable ending of the book, not too bad... I guess the target reader group for the book would have been those who have never lived or been exposed to any other culture than the US ones?


message 7: by Christina (new)

Christina Flammang I disagree with the negative reviews. I felt that Mariam's review of this book & author was extreme and harsh. I feel that some reviewers are venting their frustration regarding cultural & political issues that do not belong on a book review site. The book is a work of fiction and does not claim to be non-fiction account or a documentary. What is the sense of attacking an author because her husband is from Iran and she is not. Many authors rely on research and the creative process to write a novel.


message 8: by Nadia (new)

Nadia Jaber may God bless you dor your review. no other words can be put together the way you did to defend Iranian women .Freedom can't be obtained by boob jobs or trying to be sexy all the time in order to impress some man , from my point of view freedom is only obtained when you are all good with yourself no matter what you are wearing. Keep an open mind and the sky is your limit.


message 9: by Lulu (new)

Lulu Mariam, do you have any suggestions on books about Iran? Thanks for your review.


message 10: by Amanda Francis (new)

Amanda  Francis Tell em Meriem! Kudos :) I hate these ignorant white people writing about Muslims & Muslim majority countries when they have no idea what they're on about.


message 11: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Shelden As others have said... It is a fictional story!! Perhaps you people should be reading historical books or biographies instead of what your are looking for is factual information. I enjoyed the book very much!! Hopefully these awful reviews do not push people away from reading it.


message 12: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Shelden As others have said... It is a fictional story!! Perhaps you people should be reading historical books or biographies instead of what your are looking for is factual information. I enjoyed the book very much!! Hopefully these awful reviews do not push people away from reading it.


message 13: by Josefa (new)

Josefa Wann I agree with Amanda. I enjoyed the book as a fiction love story. The book is meant to entertain not to be read as a true tale of Iran and Islam, etc. Just chill people.


message 14: by Abs (new)

Abs When a person from a minority group speaks out about something you do not come in to correct and tell them to "chill" you shut up and listen. Write your own review if you loved the book so much. I picked up this book and looked up who wrote it, that alone made me skip it and this review lets me know I made the right choice.


message 15: by Josefa (new)

Josefa Wann Delis wrote: "When a person from a minority group speaks out about something you do not come in to correct and tell them to "chill" you shut up and listen. Write your own review if you loved the book so much. I ..."

Maybe you should shut up. We all have our own opinion, if you don't like mine, too bad. It's called Freedom of Speech.


message 16: by Amanda Francis (new)

Amanda  Francis Delis wrote: "When a person from a minority group speaks out about something you do not come in to correct and tell them to "chill" you shut up and listen. Write your own review if you loved the book so much. I ..."


You have officially won the internet my friend! Awesome comment!


Stephanie moratzka Do you have any suggestions on books to read that are more accurate? I liked the book, but when I read in ages ago I didn't know much about Islam. I know more now, but not enough. Thanks for your review!


message 18: by Aleen (new)

Aleen Wafaa Shoufani well, i do think that this character in this story reflects a lot of girls who live in Iran and wish to live in America, freedom is to do whatever you want! as long as you don't hurt nobody. i don't think that Iranian girls can really laugh loud in public, or dance in public, or kiss in public!
there are so many things there that is not allowed.
im arab and christian. i believe in god, and i say Inshallah but i drink alcohol and i dance and i laugh loud if i want to. and i can wear whatever i want and i don't think that because of this.. allah is gonna put me in hell!
this book is so real,
so damn real.
this little things represents the right of freedom.
live one week there with their rules and then decide if this book does not reflect well the culture there.


message 19: by Ann (new)

Ann Agbayani I appreciate your review. I am reading this book for Bookclub and am so frustrated with it and just want to stop reading it. I agree with all your points. I could not find this book at the SFPL and now I understand why.


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