Inge’s review of American Gods (American Gods, #1) > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by MLE (new)

MLE  It is very weird. I think that's part of what I love about it. You may enjoy Neverwhere more.


message 2: by Inge (new)

Inge MLE wrote: "It is very weird. I think that's part of what I love about it. You may enjoy Neverwhere more."

I can love weird, up to a certain extent. But I'll definitely try some of his other work, like Neverwhere or Stardust.


message 3: by MLE (new)

MLE  Either one of those would probably be a better choice. They are a different sort of weird, if that makes sense.


message 4: by Inge (new)

Inge It makes sense. This book puts weird on a whole different level. :o)


message 5: by Natalie (new)

Natalie Monroe We're in the same boat. I'm not a huge fan of him either.


message 6: by Inge (new)

Inge Natalie wrote: "We're in the same boat. I'm not a huge fan of him either."

There are two options here.
1) I'm picking the wrong books
2) I will never jump aboard the Gaiman bandwagon

I'm hoping for #1.


message 7: by MLE (new)

MLE  Inge wrote: "Natalie wrote: "We're in the same boat. I'm not a huge fan of him either."

There are two options here.
1) I'm picking the wrong books
2) I will never jump aboard the Gaiman bandwagon

I'm hoping f..."


If it's not for you, it's not for you. Can't force yourself to love something you don't.


message 8: by Inge (new)

Inge I know. I'm just a little sad about it, because I do like him as a person.


Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ Neverwhere was a lot more standard fantasy, with kind of a cool London underground setting. I thought The Ocean at the End of the Lane was good, with some Gaiman quirkiness but not over the top. I don't remember Stardust very well; I read it several years ago and didn't find it memorable, but I remember sort of a fairy-tale-ish fantasy plot, again a lot less weird than American Gods.

I've got American Gods sitting on my home bookshelf but yeah, the time I started it several months ago I got to the man-eating vagina and came to screeching halt. I'm still trying to decide if I want to try again sometime.


message 10: by Inge (new)

Inge I'm pretty sure that's the most "memorable" scene of the book, and not in a good way. I've read The Ocean at the End of the Lane and I didn't like it either, again - too weird and didn't know what was going on.

I think I need to venture in his more common fantasy books.


message 11: by MLE (new)

MLE  Inge wrote: "I know. I'm just a little sad about it, because I do like him as a person."

There's a few authors I like as people even though I'm not crazy about their books.


message 12: by Gavin (new)

Gavin Despite a few tries I've also failed to warm to Gaiman as a writer.


Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ Gavin wrote: "Despite a few tries I've also failed to warm to Gaiman as a writer."

I've got Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch in my TBR pile. I'm hoping it will be a little more accessible than American Gods and Anansi Boys (also sitting on my book shelf unread).


message 14: by Mary (new)

Mary Catelli I find him unreliable. This is one of the ones I can't stand. I found Neverwhere and Stardust better.


message 15: by Sh3lly (new)

Sh3lly I DNFd around 62% or so. I didn't mind the weirdness, but I felt the pacing got soooooo slow. It could have been a lot shorter. The middle dragged too much and I got bored.


David - proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party " stories about eating tiger balls and man-eating vaginas, I cannot deal with" - Come to think of it, in The Sandman, Vol. 2: The Doll's House, Gaiman also featured a serial killer named The Corinthian who has teeth in his eye-sockets that would eat a person's finger if they tried to remove his glasses...what is it with Gaiman and hungry body parts?!? :o


message 17: by Inge (new)

Inge David "proud member of Branwen's adventuring party" wrote: "" stories about eating tiger balls and man-eating vaginas, I cannot deal with" - Come to think of it, in The Sandman, Vol. 2: The Doll's House, Gaiman also featured a serial killer nam..."

Actually, that would be pretty handy. How many people go "Hey, can I try on your glasses?" :o)


message 18: by Kristin (new)

Kristin Not to rain on your bandwagon parade, but I'm so glad that I'm not alone in the weird department. This book was just too much off the wall for me. I tried like you, but just couldn't do it.


message 19: by Inge (new)

Inge Kristin wrote: "Not to rain on your bandwagon parade, but I'm so glad that I'm not alone in the weird department. This book was just too much off the wall for me. I tried like you, but just couldn't do it."

I'm glad I'm not the only one!


message 20: by Gavin (new)

Gavin Tadiana wrote: "Gavin wrote: "Despite a few tries I've also failed to warm to Gaiman as a writer."

I've got Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch in my TBR pile. I'm hop..."


I've yet to try a Terry Pratchett book despite having his books highly recommended to me by a few different people. The Gaiman books I have read are Stardust and Coraline. Both are worse than the movie versions. Normally after two failures I'd call it quits on an author but rumors of an HBO adaption of American Gods nearly tempted me into reading that book.


message 21: by David W. (new)

David W. According to the info provided by the hosts of the Anglo-Filles podcast (episode 22), Bryan Fuller's going to produce the HBO American Gods and he's leaving That Scene (you know, the one that broke Inge and many others) in the show.


message 22: by Inge (new)

Inge Oh dear lord.


message 23: by Martyn (new)

Martyn Stanley This sounds, um, a bit too 'off the beaten track' for me! Ahem, Like Inge said - I can do weird, weird is cool - but I draw the line at totally bat-shit crazy, loopy, 'what was he smoking' weird!

:(


message 24: by Mimi (new)

Mimi I like Neil Gaiman, but I've found that I think I like his books "for kids" more than the ones shelved in sections "for adults" ... idk why.I read about half of this book right after I read The Ocean at the End of the Lane. I felt that there was almost no comparison. Not that I'd say this book is bad ... they just weren't the same at all for me.


message 25: by Inge (new)

Inge I didn't like American Gods nor Ocean at the End of the Lane. :P I also didn't like Coraline, because I saw the movie first and I think the book paled into comparison. But I haven't given up yet. I think I'll read Stardust next.


message 26: by Mimi (last edited Dec 07, 2014 01:44PM) (new)

Mimi Inge wrote: "I didn't like American Gods nor Ocean at the End of the Lane. :P I also didn't like Coraline, because I saw the movie first and I think the book paled into comparison. But I haven't given up yet. I..."

Weird you should mention that one next ... I know someone who is a total book junkie (a compliment, of course) who liked the Stardust movie way more than they liked the book. I guess Neil Gaiman must be an acquired taste.


message 27: by Mary (new)

Mary Catelli It's not just that he's an acquired taste. It's that a lot of us like some but not all of his works.


message 28: by Inge (new)

Inge I guess I'm picking up all the wrong books then :P


message 29: by Caroline (new)

Caroline I finished AG but didn't love it as I'd been hoping I would. It's really, really weird and didn't always make a whole lot of sense. I'll give another of his books a shot, though.


message 30: by Inge (new)

Inge I've read Coraline, Ocean at the End of the Lane, and this one. None of them have managed to impress me. I'm really sad about this, because I was so excited to finally jump on the Gaiman bandwagon.


message 31: by Caroline (new)

Caroline Inge wrote: "I've read Coraline, Ocean at the End of the Lane, and this one. None of them have managed to impress me. I'm really sad about this, because I was so excited to finally jump on the Gaiman bandwagon."

That's how I felt, Inge. I want to be a Gaiman fan! *whine* So many seem to love him. At the same time, it seems those who dislike his style, REALLY dislike his style. You certainly have given him a fair chance by reading three of his books!


message 32: by Inge (new)

Inge Life would be so much easier if we could just be Gaiman fans, Caroline.


Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽ One thing that's impressed me about Gaiman is that he's so versatile. His books can vary really widely in terms of subject matter and style. So not liking some of his books doesn't mean you won't like another. That's why I keep trying with him.

I'd say the two Gaiman books that I thought were most alike are Neverwhere and Stardust, which fall more into the traditional fantasy mold (almost a little too much so, if you know what I mean) than his other books that I've read. Those two aren't weird at all, really. Which may be good or bad for the reader, depending on your POV.

If you like really creepy horror stories, you might try his short story, Snow, Glass, Apples. Just a warning: It does get perverse and explicit.


message 34: by Inge (new)

Inge I think the conventional fantasy might be more up my alley, actually. I've also found him to be very versatile, so I'm definitely not giving up on him yet. :)


message 35: by Bee (new)

Bee Ocean at the End of the Lane could be more accessible too.
Also his collections of short stories, Smoke and Mirrors had a nice range.


message 36: by Inge (new)

Inge Bee wrote: "Ocean at the End of the Lane could be more accessible too.
Also his collections of short stories, Smoke and Mirrors had a nice range."


I've read Ocean and wasn't a fan, but I'll try something else later. :)


message 37: by RamMohan Reddy (new)

RamMohan Reddy Nelluru I agree with your review. i cant deal with this book


message 38: by book babe (new)

book babe I absolutely love Neil Gaiman but hated this book!! Try some of his other work and dont let it put you off!


Eon ♒Windrunner♒  Did not like this one either, but enjoyed The Graveyard Book a lot.


message 40: by Ginger (new)

Ginger Gaiman is such a hit or miss for me too. I want to Love Everything he writes. But I don't. :(


message 41: by Jen (new)

Jen Thank goodness, I'm not the only one! Thank you for your review, I thought I was the only person who didn't "get" Gaiman. :)


message 42: by Matthew (new)

Matthew Yup, that about sums it up - I cannot jump on the Gaiman bandwagon no matter how hard I try!


message 43: by Cheri (new)

Cheri I enjoyed The Ocean At The End Of The Lane


message 44: by Juliet (new)

Juliet Honestly, this may be blasphemy, but I struggled to read Neverwhere at first, and then BBC did the radio version of it, and I was like, "oh, James McAvoy. Okay, I'll try it." And it was okay. So when BBC radio did a version of American Gods, I was like, "Sure, I have time to kill in the car." And it messed with me.
I feel like his stuff is made to be heard rather than read? At least for me. He is an amazing speaker, which I think feeds into it.


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