Austin’s review of The Charisma Myth: How Anyone Can Master the Art and Science of Personal Magnetism > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Richard (new)

Richard So you assert that the studies, which she cites, are wrong? Based on what, exactly?


message 2: by [deleted user] (new)

cha·ris·ma
/kəˈrizmə/
Noun
1. Compelling attractiveness or charm that can inspire devotion in others.
2. A divinely conferred power or talent.

This book does tell readers how to be charismatic in the first sense.


message 3: by Austin (last edited Oct 08, 2013 02:07PM) (new)

Austin Burbridge Richard wrote: "So you assert that the studies, which she cites, are wrong? Based on what, exactly?"

First, thanks for your contribution to the discussion, which makes for a lively forum.

However, my response is to your question is:

No; (as any plain reading of the 312 words of my review would show) I did not assert that studies which the author cites are wrong. It is not necessary, because:

Whether the cited “studies” be “right” or “wrong” is irrelevant, because the mere citation of “studies” in support of a thesis, is not probative. To adduce only things which support one's argument is rhetoric: an appeal to emotion, not reason. That is a kind of pseudoscientific tendentiousness.

Actual proof (a logical or “scientific” approach) would involve—among other things—the citation of studies which do not agree with the claims, as well as ones which do.

That said, a confident expert would not feel the need to engage in what is, after all, a kind of name-dropping. Offering examples from the expert’s own professional experiences ought to be enough in the context of a self-help book. That the author feels the need to engage in stacking the deck with pseudoscientific citation, suggests that she does not feel very confident in her assertions, and—worse—that she feels no confidence that the reader will accept her claims as prima facie reasonable. That’s not even effective rhetoric.


message 4: by Austin (last edited Oct 08, 2013 01:55PM) (new)

Austin Burbridge Benjamin wrote: "cha·ris·ma
/kəˈrizmə/
Noun
1. Compelling attractiveness or charm that can inspire devotion in others.
2. A divinely conferred power or talent.

This book does tell readers how to be charismatic in the first sense."


Gosh—that’s rather “damning with faint praise,” isn’t it? That probably does more damage to the book’s reputation that my panning of it. “With friends like that, what need of enemies?”


message 5: by [deleted user] (new)

Your criticism seems to be of charisma itself, and of those who wield it, but not of this book and its ability to make people charismatic. You seem to argue for a strawman.


message 6: by pthurhliyeh (new)

pthurhliyeh very interesting review, thank you.


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