Stephen’s review of Great Expectations > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Kay (new)

Kay Wonderful review! Makes me want to pick up Dickens again. I alternately snoozed through and, the night before exams, rush-read Great Expectations during high school and never recovered from the experience.

Your review clearly tells me I must give Dickens another try.


message 2: by s.penkevich (new)

s.penkevich Always meant to re-read this, it was Freshman year of highschool required reading and I think we had an abridged version. Great review!


message 3: by Richard (new)

Richard Derus When he tugs on the heart-strings, he does so as a maestro plucks the violin and you will feel played and thankful for the experience.

Ummm...no...I will feel revolted and manipulated.

Dickens never bashes over the head with the emotional power of his prose.

...are we reading the same book...? "For now my repugnance to him had all melted away, and in the hunted, wounded, shackled creature who held my hand in his, I only saw a man who had meant to be my benefactor, and who had felt affectionately, gratefully, and generously, towards me with great constancy through a series of years." OWOWOW quit hitting me owowow and smack goes the verbiage upside my poor defenseless head.

*sigh* Well, chacun à son goût, of course, but this bilge gives me gout.

But to give you all the credit you've earned, the review is some of your best writing, and it's well-argued if wrong-headed.

I seem to say that to you a lot, don't I?


message 4: by s.penkevich (new)

s.penkevich Ha oh Richard, I'm so glad we became GR friends


message 5: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Richard wrote: "But to give you all the credit you've earned, the review is some of your best writing, and it's well-argued if wrong-headed.

I seem to say that to you a lot, don't I?"


When it comes to me and my Dickens, I could ask for nothing more from you. Thank you, kind sir.


message 6: by Richard (new)

Richard Derus s.penkevich wrote: "Ha oh Richard, I'm so glad we became GR friends"

What a very nice thing to say! Thank you, and I return the sentiment.


message 7: by Stephen (new)

Stephen s.penkevich wrote: "Ha oh Richard, I'm so glad we became GR friends"

s., Richard's comments and observations are as good as it gets and he certainly makes GR a far better place.

He is, of course, so wrong when it comes to Dickens that it can not be measured by existing technology, but we forgive him this because his bashing is so brilliantly entertaining.


message 8: by Richard (new)

Richard Derus Stephen wrote: "He is, of course, so wrong when it comes to Dickens that it can not be measured by existing technology"

I know you are, but what am I?


message 9: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Kerrie wrote: "What is my excuse for never having read any Dickens? None! I love his buddy Wilkie Collins, so I must get on the Dickens train posthaste."

Kerrie, I have only read one short story be Wilkie Collins but am going to read my first novel of his pretty soon (debating between which one to start with but probably either Moonstone or the Woman in White).


message 10: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Kay wrote: "Wonderful review! Makes me want to pick up Dickens again. I alternately snoozed through and, the night before exams, rush-read Great Expectations during high school and never recovered from the e..."

Thanks, Kay. I'm glad you liked it.


message 11: by Richard (new)

Richard Derus Stephen wrote: "debating between which one to start with but probably either Moonstone or the Woman in White"

Worthy book both, but The Woman in White juuust edges The Moonstone IMO because it's a little more atmospherically creepy.

Have you got your TiVo set for Prophets of Science Fiction tonight?


message 12: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Oh yes...the prophets shall be preaching.


message 13: by Richard (new)

Richard Derus Stephen wrote: "Oh yes...the prophets shall be preaching."

Good! Can't wait to hear what you think of the series.


message 14: by Shauna (last edited Feb 15, 2012 12:47PM) (new)

Shauna Well, now I know A Tale of Two Cities will have to be my next Dickens.

I'm curious about this alternate ending. I'm assuming the one I read (view spoiler) is the 'happy' one?
I did feel at the time that it wasn't entirely in keeping with her character, but then I thought who knows how hard she's had it? and brushed it off.


message 15: by Megan (new)

Megan I read this book my freshman year in high school and I hate to say it but I absolutely couldn't stand this book. After reading A Tale of Two Cities I have always wanted to give it a reread though. Maybe reading it outside of a school setting and at an older age will make me appreciate it more... we shall see. Great review though!


message 16: by Lea (new)

Lea Dang it, Stephen -- honestly. Didn't I say I absolutely would NOT read Dickens?? You KNOW I did, and yet here you are, making it sound like such a great book . . . And I actually LAUGHED -- out loud! -- at the funny parts you quoted. And the quotes at the end made me sad. And now I have to READ THIS BOOK, and it is all. your. fault.


message 17: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Shauna wrote: "Well, now I know A Tale of Two Cities will have to be my next Dickens.

I'm curious about this alternate ending. I'm assuming the one I read [spoilers removed] is the 'happy' one?
I did feel at th..."


Shauna, yes that is the happier ending and while it doesn't quite feel in sync with all that came before, I sure liked it.


message 18: by Richard (new)

Richard Derus Stephen wrote: "yes that is the happier ending"

GAWD this is KILLIN me not to make dirty puns


message 19: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Megan wrote: "I read this book my freshman year in high school and I hate to say it but I absolutely couldn't stand this book. After reading A Tale of Two Cities I have always wanted to give it a reread though. ..."

Thanks, Megan. I think I was fortunate not to have been "forced" to read Dickens in school. It might have hampered my current enjoyment of his work. Coming to his work later in life has been a real joy for me.


message 20: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Lea wrote: "Dang it, Stephen -- honestly. Didn't I say I absolutely would NOT read Dickens?? You KNOW I did, and yet here you are, making it sound like such a great book . . . And I actually LAUGHED -- out ..."

Sorry, Lea. I can't help the gush. :) I really hope you have a good experience with this one if you give it a try.


message 21: by Lea (new)

Lea Richard wrote:
GAWD this is KILLIN me not to make dirty puns"


Ha! My mind went there, too. Sadly. I'm apparently a 14 year old boy IRL.


message 22: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Richard wrote: "Stephen wrote: "yes that is the happier ending"

GAWD this is KILLIN me not to make dirty puns"


Go on, sir. Pun away.


message 23: by Richard (new)

Richard Derus Stephen wrote: "Lea wrote: "Dang it, Stephen -- honestly. Didn't I say I absolutely would NOT read Dickens?? You KNOW I did, and yet here you are, making it sound like such a great book . . . And I actually LAU..."

LEA!! Ignore Stephen and stick to your anti-Dickensite guns! There is nothing but misery and gloom ahead if you venture into the miasmic swamps of Victorian sesquipedalianistic literary onanism!


message 24: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Lea, I don't know exactly what Mr. fancy words just said, but my response to him is....SAYS YOU!!


message 25: by Richard (new)

Richard Derus Stephen wrote: "Richard wrote: "Stephen wrote: "yes that is the happier ending"

GAWD this is KILLIN me not to make dirty puns"

Go on, sir. Pun away."


Too many too many gush happy endings happier endings eeeeee


message 26: by Lea (new)

Lea Richard wrote: "Too many too many gush happy endings happier..."

Stephen! You broke Richard!


message 27: by Christine (new)

Christine Three words:

Read Anthony Trollope


message 28: by Lea (new)

Lea Richard wrote: "LEA!! Ignore Stephen and stick to your anti-Dickensite guns! There is nothing but misery and gloom ahead if you venture into the miasmic swamps of Victorian sesquipedalianistic literary onanism!"

I recognized one those those words. (Because I'm a 14 year old boy IRL.) Hee hee!


message 29: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Chris wrote: "Three words:

Read Anthony Trollope"


Thanks, Chris. I have never read anything by him. Is there one that youn recommend as a good place to start?


message 30: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Lea wrote: "Stephen! You broke Richard!"

Aw poop. Riiiiiiiiichaaaaaaaaard!!!!!!!! Step away from the light.


message 31: by Karla (new)

Karla RE: Trollope. I've read He Knew He Was Right and it's good, but you'll probably want to beat the male character with a sack of oranges by the time you're finished.


message 32: by Stephen (last edited Feb 15, 2012 03:54PM) (new)

Stephen Sold....but I prefer a sock full of nickels as I think I can get a bit more velocity.


message 33: by Christine (new)

Christine For Trollope, you should start with Barset. Barchester Towers. Or the Pallisers novels.


message 34: by Richard (new)

Richard Derus Chris wrote: "For Trollope, you should start with Barset. Barchester Towers. Or the Pallisers novels."

The Chronicles of Barsetshire start with The Warden, and followed by Barchester Towers, which are the first two I'd recommend reading.


message 35: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Thank you, sir. Watching the PKD episode of Prophets right now. The man was a true prophet and a mad genius.


message 36: by Richard (new)

Richard Derus Stephen wrote: "Thank you, sir. Watching the PKD episode of Prophets right now. The man was a true prophet and a mad genius."

Agreed! So way cool, this show, and the HG Wells one is up next.

The Man in the High Castle is more impressive than ever when I realized his alternative universes hypothesis was well and truly unsupported by the physicists of the day.


message 37: by Stephen (new)

Stephen I caught that too. I was blown away by The Man in the High Castle and it got inched up another notch today.


message 38: by Richard (new)

Richard Derus I also hadn't realized that Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was written in 1967! Wowee toledo what a mindfuck! This man was a friggin' genius! To have thought this up at that time...!

All hail PKD!


message 39: by Richard (new)

Richard Derus OOO OOO I forgot to tell you! PKD and Jane Austen were both born on 16 December. No wonder you love them both.


message 40: by Stephen (new)

Stephen What witty, paranoid and brilliant offspring they could have made.


message 41: by Richard (new)

Richard Derus *blink*

Northanger High Castle

Pride and Electric Sheep

A Bennet Darkly


message 42: by Naftoli (new)

Naftoli I liked this book too, read it years ago. However, my all time favorite is Tale of Two Cities ...


message 43: by Nandakishore (new)

Nandakishore Varma Stephen and Richard,

Both of you could be straight out of P.G.Wodehouse, you know...

LOL


message 44: by Richard (new)

Richard Derus Nandakishore wrote: "Stephen and Richard,

Both of you could be straight out of P.G.Wodehouse, you know...

LOL"


Heh...nice of you to say!


message 45: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Nandakishore wrote: "Stephen and Richard,

Both of you could be straight out of P.G.Wodehouse, you know...

LOL"


Richard, stop playing that banjolele.


message 46: by Richard (new)

Richard Derus Stephen wrote: "Nandakishore wrote: "Stephen and Richard,

Both of you could be straight out of P.G.Wodehouse, you know...

LOL"

Richard, stop playing that banjolele."


Not until you get rid of the white dinner jacket.


message 47: by Stephen (new)

Stephen Never!! And stop sneering at my cow creamer.


message 48: by Richard (new)

Richard Derus Stephen wrote: "Never!! And stop sneering at my cow creamer."

*continues appraising glances at Georgian silver cow creamer*

How much filthy lucre d'you suppose it's worth?


message 49: by Stephen (last edited Feb 15, 2012 08:54PM) (new)

Stephen More than your Aunt Dahlia's willing to pay for it. Now about the cucumbers and the lobster...


message 50: by Richard (new)

Richard Derus Stephen wrote: "More than your Aunt Dahlia's willing to pay for it. Now about the cucumbers and the lobster..."

Filthy Spode! I have but two words for you: Eulalie Sœurs Yes, that's right, I KNOW about your ladies' undergarments business!

Now, as I can hear aunt trumpeting to aunt as mastodons did across the primordial swamps, I shall leg it until next time for the old eggs and b.


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