Aubrey’s review of The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Brian (new)

Brian Very nice - thanks for the personal reflections in your review. I've wanted to read more Spark after tackling this one - your review reminded me I need to do that.


message 2: by Aubrey (new)

Aubrey Thank you, Brian. I look forward to your future readings of her, as I don't currently have any other of her works added, and I'd welcome recommendations.


message 3: by s.penkevich (new)

s.penkevich Wonderful review, so glad you liked this one! And I greatly enjoyed the personal analysis and reflection, really good stuff. Having spent time working in high schools, I've found it is the quiet ones that actually give a damn and do there work that are the ones you like the most. Mostly because everyone else are so grating on the nerves ha. Being in a lit class for student teaching, any time a student protested 'this book is stupid' I wanted to yell 'NO! Your stupid, you fail' haha (okay, it was a Steinbeck book and he is close to my heart.) I'm rambling. Fantastic review, it is always a joy to find a new review from you!


message 4: by Aubrey (last edited Nov 23, 2013 11:35AM) (new)

Aubrey Thank you very much, s.penki. It's always a joy to receive a comment from you during the eagerly awaited times when you're around. I'm less quiet now, but you'd still like me as a student (hint: I'm the one making the lit/feminist references).


message 5: by s.penkevich (new)

s.penkevich Even better! The students who care are so much more fun ha. Thanks, I hope to be on more, things are getting back to normal here.


message 6: by Ted (new)

Ted Lovely review, Aubrey. I hope I can read this book some day. (I really enjoyed the movie of it when I got it from Netflix a few years ago. I think Maggie Smith won an Oscar for her portrayal of Miss Jean.)

You said "I do like my literature that takes childhood seriously". I wonder what you would think of A High Wind in Jamaica? Have you read that? When I read that book many years ago I remember being absolutely shaken by the view of children that is presented, but I decided then, and have never changed my mind, that it was probably not a flawed view.

Where did you go to high school?


message 7: by Dolors (new)

Dolors Loved the personal touch in this review Aubrey. In the end all paths lead to Rome and you seem to have grown wise during the journey. I appreciated the different tone of this review, excellent Aubrey.


message 8: by Aubrey (last edited Nov 23, 2013 12:59PM) (new)

Aubrey Ted wrote: "Lovely review, Aubrey. I hope I can read this book some day. (I really enjoyed the movie of it when I got it from Netflix a few years ago. I think Maggie Smith won an Oscar for her portrayal of Mis..."

Thank you, Ted. I'll have to check out the movie; Dame Maggie Smith is one of my absolute favorites.

I do have A High Wind in Jamaica on hand, actually, and will have to bump it up the list based on your recommendation.

I was at Mission San Jose High School. An intense little place for a public school.


message 9: by Aubrey (new)

Aubrey Dolors wrote: "Loved the personal touch in this review Aubrey. In the end all paths lead to Rome and you seem to have grown wise during the journey. I appreciated the different tone of this review, excellent Aubrey."

Thank you, Dolors. I do like my variety, and I'm glad my venture into new territory went so well.


message 10: by Ted (new)

Ted Aubrey wrote: "Ted wrote: "Lovely review, Aubrey. I hope I can read this book some day. (I really enjoyed the movie of it when I got it from Netflix a few years ago. I think Maggie Smith won an Oscar for her port..."

That looks like quite a high school, Aubrey! I hope you have some great memories of it to go with maybe some stressed ones.


message 11: by Ema (new)

Ema Glad you liked this one, as it's on my 20 short reads to reach that distressing reading goal of mine. It will be my first Muriel Spark as well, but it's good to know that she excels in the microenvironmental scope, because I have a collection of her sort fiction on my shelves.


message 12: by Aubrey (new)

Aubrey I look forward to your reading of her, Ema. This slight tome packs quite a punch.


message 13: by Ted (last edited Sep 18, 2014 08:27PM) (new)

Ted Just reread this really interesting review, Aubrey, and liked it all over (though I couldn't really Like it again).

You say "I spend enough time as it is in deconstructing all that I thought I knew in those days of desks and paper and the persistent feeling of an invisible cage ...". That sounds like a wonderful way to spend a portion of one's time now and then. The closest I can relate to it is a thought that has recurred over and over to me over perhaps the last four decades: my life didn't begin until college. This not because I had an unhappy childhood, quite the contrary. Neither because I had no good teachers in HS. Simply because it was only when I arrived at my freshman year in college that I began to see that there were things in life that I'd never recognized before. The study of literature, philosophy for God's sake, instructors who knew more than a small town culture in Minnesota would ever be interested in (though again, I did have one or two teachers who were this knowledgeable, but for whatever reason I never made such connections).

I suspect that these revelations were not what you lacked in the wonderful HS that you attended. And again I'm not knocking my HS education, my dad was a teacher there. It's the small-town mentality of Main Street (Sauk Centre MN, about 25 miles from where I grew up); but that mentality not only is a veil over parts of life, it's also something that at least in the past allowed a youngster to grow up in an idyllic (dare I say) environment which, for better or worse, delays one's entry into life as it really is.


message 14: by Paula (new)

Paula Kalin What a wonderful review. Loved the movie, but never read the book.


message 15: by Aubrey (new)

Aubrey Ted wrote: "Just reread this really interesting review, Aubrey, and liked it all over (though I couldn't really Like it again).

You say "I spend enough time as it is in deconstructing all that I thought I kne..."


My high school was very test score/Ivy League/popular kids were the geniuses type experience, and afterwards it took me years to realize my drive to learn could consist of joyful passion rather than fearful obligation. So, I also had a very "my life didn't begin until college" experience, or a partial one, as it felt even moreso after I left and even more now that I'm ready to return. One couldn't call my childhood idyllic, but there was a measure of bliss in its blinkered ignorance.

If I go the rest of my days without encountering that solipsistic breed of content again, my life will have been worth living.


message 16: by Aubrey (new)

Aubrey Paula wrote: "What a wonderful review. Loved the movie, but never read the book."

Thank you, Paula. I've never seen the film, but I can attest for the book.


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