Lyn’s review of How Proust Can Change Your Life > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Fionnuala (new)

Fionnuala I relished every word of your distillation of de Botton's distillation of Proust's words, Lyn. I got more out of it than I did when trying to distill de Botton for myself! Though I have to credit de Botton with part of the motivation for making me finally read all of Proust.
And I loved his little (surely tongue in cheek) aside on people with an aristocratic sounding 'de' before their names!


message 2: by Ilse (last edited Aug 06, 2018 02:47AM) (new)

Ilse You make me want to read this (and Proust!) again, Lyn (oh how that summation of his little hypochondriacal traits made me laugh, that ' Sensitivity to Altitude (Claims altitude sickness after visit to Versailles which is 83 metres above Paris)' had me chortling) - at the time I read this I had been binge-reading de Botton, while now I feel I can appreciate him more in smaller doses.


message 3: by Lyn (new)

Lyn Elliott Fionnuala wrote: "I relished every word of your distillation of de Botton's distillation of Proust's words, Lyn. I got more out of it than I did when trying to distill de Botton for myself! Though I have to credit d..."

I'm sorry to be so late back to you Fionnuala, I have spent very little time on Goodreads in the last few weeks, and I find I can only reply to comments when I'm using the web version on my computer, not the iPad app which has frustratingly fewer features. Anyway, here I am now! I enjoyed your comments, and find myself smiling whenever i think of this book. De Botton is so clever he's a joy.


message 4: by Lyn (new)

Lyn Elliott Ilse wrote: "You make me want to read this (and Proust!) again, Lyn (oh how that summation of his little hypochondriacal traits made me laugh, that ' Sensitivity to Altitude (Claims altitude sickness after visi..."
Dear Ilse, as you see from my comments to Fionnuala above I have been absent from Goodreads for a while, reading rather than writing. Thanks so much for your comment - I think I enjoy the hypochondriac's list as much as anything de Botton has written. I've avoided binges myself, and have still not read Status Anxiety and probably won't, as I don't particularly want to dwell in that territory for pleasure reading!


message 5: by Laurie (new)

Laurie Ok; I must confess. Other than essays I haven't read Proust. Would it be advisable do you think to read de Botton before I beg remembrance of things past? Or should I hold off on all of the good Proustianna until I've actually read some of the volumes?


message 6: by Lyn (new)

Lyn Elliott Ok, I confess too: I’ve never been able to stick with Proust for more than a couple of hundred pages but so much is written about his life and work that they are familiar. De Botton does such a brilliant job that you can delight in what he’s written whether or not you’ve read Proust’s work and it may even tempt you to tackle those mighty volumes.


message 7: by Laurie (new)

Laurie Good to know I'm not alone. I admit I'm possibly more fascinated by the art, music and society of the milieu of Proust than the literature itself. Although I'm edging closer. I think I'll use de Botton for motivation.


message 8: by Lyn (new)

Lyn Elliott Laurie wrote: "Good to know I'm not alone. I admit I'm possibly more fascinated by the art, music and society of the milieu of Proust than the literature itself. Although I'm edging closer. I think I'll use de Bo..."
Moi aussi!


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