Samra’s review of The Plague > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Emad (new)

Emad Attili Why all of your reviews are so encouraging? ❤️
I'm gonna read this novel very soon.


message 2: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf thank you :)I'd be looking forward to it.


message 3: by Dolors (new)

Dolors What a powerful rendering of this classic you’ve penned above, Samra... To have faith that good will prevail over evil even if one doesn’t necessarily believe in God, there is much to ponder in your words, and I wonder why I keep postponing this book...


message 4: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf Thank you for being ever so generous,Dolors!I'd really want you to make it soon :)


message 5: by Travelin (last edited Feb 25, 2018 03:45AM) (new)

Travelin I have an extreme amount of admiration for a 21 year old in Pakistan spilling out this much evocative English all at once. I wouldn't want to edit that. It almost seems like an example of automatic writing from the surrealists which I'd been hoping to find. I should point out that a sapling is unlikely to be old, though I'm no ornithologist. Am also entralled with a groin sagging with buboes, whoever they are...


message 6: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf I am delighted to receive your nice words Trave:)ahh that's how it goes when we just sit and say our hearts out (saplings are mourned for never becoming trees😂)
thank you for your kindness here!


message 7: by Travelin (new)

Travelin My apologies to you and any other doctors reading this. Buboes are a true medical condition. Has no one considered flailing them with saplings?


message 8: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf God help us if you'd to be a doctor..😂
Well,that's brutal to imagine alone..


message 9: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf thank you hon :)


message 10: by Ina (new)

Ina Cawl stunning and very great review Samra,
i guess we both enjoy classic existential novels


message 11: by Henry (new)

Henry Avila Another magnificent review, not a easy read I can imagine, but you have done an admirable job of conveying what suffering is really like. Thank you...


message 12: by Caterina (last edited Feb 25, 2018 08:06PM) (new)

Caterina Horror beyond imagination. What a passionate outcry of a review, Samra. I wonder, was this book based on an actual outbreak of the bubonic plague in Algeria?


message 13: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf @Inna,thank you for your kindness dear,we surely seem much into existential prose :)


message 14: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf @Henry,Thank you my friend for your very supportive words,means alot to me:)


message 15: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf @Caterina,The novel is believed to be based on the cholera epidemic that killed a large percentage of Oran's population in 1849 following French colonization, but the novel is placed in the 1940s. Oran and its environs were struck by disease multiple times before Camus published this novel.


message 16: by Luís (new)

Luís C. Good review, Samra! This book made me nauseating, as well like a book of another french author - Sartre. I'm referring to Nausea.. But in different, but behaved reactions..


message 17: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf thank you Luis,I am planning to visit Sartre,soon enough :)


message 18: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf to be nauseated :)


message 19: by Caterina (last edited Feb 26, 2018 08:02AM) (new)

Caterina Samra wrote: "@Caterina,The novel is believed to be based on the cholera epidemic that killed a large percentage of Oran's population in 1849 following French colonization, but the novel is placed in the 1940s. ..."

Stunning, passionate and well-written review, Samra; my previous late night comment was inadequate to your review. You communicate so well the horror and the breakdown of faith and social bonds, hell on earth, something almost impossible to face, though it has happened over and over, all over the world. I like the thought-provoking last quotation as well; let us only hope to be men and women in the best sense. I have hoped to read this although admittedly with some dread. Thank you also for the background information.


message 20: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf thank you dearest Cat,I am delighted my words reached your heart...and how beautifully you summarize the essence,yes let we be human first !


message 21: by Caterina (last edited Feb 26, 2018 08:17AM) (new)

Caterina Samra wrote: "thank you dearest Cat,I am delighted my words reached your heart...and how beautifully you summarize the essence,yes let we be human first !"

I love the intensity of your thought and writing, and the books you tackle, very impressive at age 21 (or at any age, really). A question I wrestle with lifelong -- if one must face that these things happen and no god descends from the sky to enact a rescue, what is left of faith, hope and love? I believe we must have these, faith hope and love, in order to live, but how to reformulate them in what could be called a post-apocalyptic world; whenever something like this happens anywhere in the world it is an apocalypse for the people involved.


message 22: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf I feel you there,I've been wrestling this madness the time I could make sense out of things,maybe love is the strongest anchor of all,maybe even for the post apocalyptic world,stronger than faith and brighter than hope,as the formers stagger or diminish when faced with chaos,love binds us together world together.


message 23: by Caterina (new)

Caterina Samra wrote: "I feel you there,I've been wrestling this madness the time I could make sense out of things,maybe love is the strongest anchor of all,maybe even for the post apocalyptic world,stronger than faith a..."

Amen, sister.


message 24: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf :)


message 25: by Ilse (new)

Ilse Excellent evocative write-up, Samra - I read the book long ago but your words revive its atmosphere and protagonist intensely. La peste in many respects spoke more to me than L'étranger, and your last quote pinpoints exactly why.


message 26: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf Thank you Ilse for your appreciation :)I can't say one from the two though..


message 27: by Caterina (new)

Caterina Samra, the disturbing insights of your review have remained in my mind for many days, reminding me of something that happened in the U.S. in my memory. A plague of AIDS visited the city of San Francisco during the 1980s-1990s. The city was full of emaciated and dying people covered with sores; many of whom were homeless gay men and prostitutes that society judged harshly and almost literally threw into the gutter to die. (This also affected Seattle where I lived in a favorite gay neighborhood during the 1990s.) The first person to build a hospice and care for people dying of AIDS in San Francisco was not a San Franciscan but Mother Teresa of Kolkata, who is still remembered with great love in the gay community because of this, and because of her unconditional loving care. Apropos of your comments about the afterlife, when people who were dying of AIDS were terrified that they might go to hell, because that is what society, their families, and the institutional church had told them, Mother Teresa told them: Of course you are not going to hell, you are going to heaven! Whatever anyone may believe about whether or not there is a heaven, I believe that this was an act of great compassion. By saying this she said: I love you, I care for you, you are not a piece of trash to be thrown into the fire, this illness is not a judgement on you, you are worthy of life and love, and you can die in peace without fear of God's judgment. In this way, a group of women who regarded themselves as servants of God literally changed the culture in San Francisco and many other places where they served dying people. No wonder Mother Teresa felt such darkness and absence of God, witnessing things like this over and over again, and yet she never gave up, and I do call her a saint. (I don't buy the polemical arguments against her.) Despite their very different beliefs with regard to the divine, maybe we could say both Mother Teresa and Dr. Rieux were living in faith, hope and love. No doubt I'm an idealist, but how I long to see us human beings stop wasting our energy on the things that divide us and actually figure out ways to live in peace with our differences... Kind of a long comment, but isn't this what Goodreads is about?


message 28: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf O my! I can only imagine the pain you went through seeing those victims and how inhumane people can be,in such testing times,I've never though seen someone struggling for life this way or with such horris disease,I feel as if I know how it must be like to marginalized,and in the part of my world..Cat,it's worst possible scenario for someone to be openly gay or for prostitutes,I am glad they got some comfort in face of Teresa,here,i am afraid it won't be even possible:(ahh this judgment before judgment kills people,and it's the beauty of your heart that is brimming through your words,yes we need to change the direction,need to cut the roots that stray us apart,be that religion,gender,or what..I am glad your shared your memories,may we never be faced with something that fails us in the face of humanity!


message 29: by Caterina (new)

Caterina Samra, I do hope that change comes to your part of the world, as there has been so much change here during my lifetime and my parents' lifetime; of course much more is still needed.


message 30: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf We need to be receptive,aside from hopeful for the change..a long way to go :)


message 31: by Kalliope (new)

Kalliope You write beautifully, Samra. This novel requires an introduction and you have given a splendid one. I read this years ago, in University. Haunting.


message 32: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf Thank you Kall,and what a perfectly fitting word,"haunting" indeed!


message 33: by Gautam (new)

Gautam To begin reading your review is like getting into an enigmatic cave where the reader, completely oblivious of anything else but the mysterious and meaningful aura of the cave, only to truncate the trance at the exit of the cave, which in this case represents the final full-stop of your ardent review. Your wrting has an effortless flow, like the cascading of water down a hill, and the way you express your ruminations is simply brilliant. The Plague has been in my list for quite a long time now, but I think its time reshuffle my reading list. Thank you Samra.... 😊


message 34: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf O gosh Gautam! I am just... err it's beautiful,your rich sense of analogies..aww thank you so much for your keen observations,and frequent visits to my ramblings,that I no doubt pen down in a trance most of the times :)yes time to pick up Camus then!


message 35: by Ray (new)

Ray Beautiful review Samra, you have a way with words which is striking, unique and entertaining. I enjoy reading your reviews as much as I trust you like writing them.


message 36: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf Ray! I am so thankful for your steadfast kindness,and delighted more to bring you some enjoyment through words :)


message 37: by Seemita (new)

Seemita Formidable, Samra! Absolutely powerful review! Camus can really squeeze our heart and make it beat in a very different way, imparting it a color we didn't know it was capable of holding. I haven't been able to finish reading this book the only time I picked up because it threw me off my feet, making me stagger like a spineless little haggard. But you, my friend, have not only stood your ground but have such ferociously relevant takeaways from the experience. I am glad I didn't miss this review; it would have been a crime.


message 38: by Samra (new)

Samra Yusuf Seemita wrote: "Formidable, Samra! Absolutely powerful review! Camus can really squeeze our heart and make it beat in a very different way, imparting it a color we didn't know it was capable of holding. I haven't ..."

I am glad for the time taken and read my words,Seemita :) your presence soothes the senses,like an old friend who visits us in surprise!
you're a kind friend!


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