Brent’s review of The Divine Comedy > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Stefano G. (new)

Stefano G. In Italy it's basically compulsory to read "La Divina Commedia" at school :)


message 2: by Brent (new)

Brent Weeks Sorry for the link to my own webpage. I hit the character limit here just shy of the finish.


message 3: by Brent (new)

Brent Weeks Stefano G. wrote: "In Italy it's basically compulsory to read "La Divina Commedia" at school :)"
I envy you the ability to read it in your own language! I know of people learning Italian for the express purpose of reading Dante.


message 4: by Aschie4589 (new)

Aschie4589 I dare say that in Italy many people think that reading Dante is way too boring... although we're actually very proud that he is Italian! (some teachers even make us learn lines by heart, and once you learn them... you never forget them!)


message 5: by Brent (new)

Brent Weeks Aschie4589 wrote: "I dare say that in Italy many people think that reading Dante is way too boring... although we're actually very proud that he is Italian! (some teachers even make us learn lines by heart, and once ..."

I understand absolutely. Sometimes I think that Plato was on to something when he said that formal education shouldn't begin until age 30! There's a huge value to memorizing portions of great work (it does change you a little), but we all so often dismiss the stuff we learn in school, or think that because we're 'forced' to read it that it's actually worthless!
It's a sad comment on how little students trust the education establishment, if you think about it. :(


message 6: by Stefano G. (new)

Stefano G. Brent wrote: "Stefano G. wrote: "In Italy it's basically compulsory to read "La Divina Commedia" at school :)"
I envy you the ability to read it in your own language! I know of people learning Italian for the ex..."


That's actually insane! :P I mean it's a very impressive work, but the writing is very old fashioned and poetic and for a child, forced to learn and memorize it you cannot fully appreciate his genious. The italian used by Dante is of course the truest italian, and actually sounds a lot like modern day Toscano, which is the dialect of the Tuscany region! So, I would suggest going to this region to really immerse onself in the Dante Experience.. Very happy you enjoyed it!!! :))


message 7: by Brent (new)

Brent Weeks Stefano G. wrote: "Brent wrote: "Stefano G. wrote: "In Italy it's basically compulsory to read "La Divina Commedia" at school :)"
I envy you the ability to read it in your own language! I know of people learning Ital..."


I've been to Rome and Florence. In fact, I took my wife there as a celebration for getting my first book deal! Rome has so much history and art it's mind-boggling, and I loved it for that. But Florence... Florence I loved for every reason. Seeing Michaelangelo's David was mind blowing. (I'd just read The Agony and the Ecstasy to prep for the trip, and was worried I'd be disappointed--I wasn't!)

Now you're making me want to go back!


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