Grace Tjan’s review of Brideshead Revisited > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Whitaker (new)

Whitaker I would highly recommend Mad World: Evelyn Waugh and the Secrets of Brideshead by Paula Byrne if you are at all interested in Waugh or this book. Tells the story of the real people that Waugh based his characters on. Fascinating!


message 2: by Manny (new)

Manny Brilliant! I never suspected such poetic talent. Really.


message 3: by Grace Tjan (new)

Grace Tjan Manny wrote: "Brilliant! I never suspected such poetic talent. Really."

Thanks. Manny. Somehow, this one seems to call for something poetic.


message 4: by Grace Tjan (new)

Grace Tjan Whitaker wrote: "I would highly recommend Mad World: Evelyn Waugh and the Secrets of Brideshead by Paula Byrne if you are at all interested in Waugh or this book. Tells the story of the real people t..."

Thanks for the recommendation, Whitaker. I think I've read an article based on this book in Vanity Fair a few years ago. It made me want to read BR.


message 5: by Whitaker (last edited May 12, 2011 03:45AM) (new)

Whitaker I was marked, of course, by my teenhood watching Jeremy Irons and Anthony Andrews in the BBC production of Brideshead.

Oddly, I've been mulling on the book this year. It occured to me that the book is structured to be a little like Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained. The first half mirrors Paradise Lost as it sees Charles thrown out of Eden (Brideshead) after he gives Sebastian forbidden fruit. The second half mirrors Paradise Regained as Charles finds salvation when Lord Brideshead (Christ/sinner) crosses himself. The reference to the whole bit of the veil of the temple being rent from top to bottom is no coincidence I think.

I may not agree with its view of the world being a devout atheist, but it has a curious beauty about it.

Ooo, and some of the best bits in Mad World are the stories about the real people that he based Anthony Blanche on.

And double ooo, are you reading the Everyman Library version of the book? I love Everyman Library. I didn't know they had Brideshead. I need to get it!!


message 6: by Grace Tjan (last edited May 12, 2011 10:00AM) (new)

Grace Tjan "I was marked, of course, by my teenhood watching Jeremy Irons and Anthony Andrews in the BBC production of Brideshead."

Apparently, this theadaptation to watch. For some reason I watched this one instead : http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0412536/.

"Oddly, I've been mulling on the book this year. It occured to me that the book is structured to be a little like Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained. The first half mirrors Paradise Lost as it sees Charles thrown out of Eden (Brideshead) after he gives Sebastian forbidden fruit. The second half mirrors Paradise Regained as Charles finds salvation when Lord Brideshead (Christ/sinner) crosses himself. The reference to the whole bit of the veil of the temple being rent from top to bottom is no coincidence I think."

That's fascinating. Is that your own theory or is it also mentioned in Mad World? I note that when speaking of Brideshead's golden age, Waugh used "Arcadian" instead of "Eden". I wonder if it has any significance.

"And double ooo, are you reading the Everyman Library version of the book?"

Alas, no. Don't they have it at Kinokuniya Ngee Ann City? I thought I saw a row of Everyman there, but that was a couple of years go.


message 7: by Whitaker (new)

Whitaker Sandybanks wrote: "For some reason I watched this one instead:"

It was, unfortunately, quite bad. I saw it with a Catholic friend who came out of the cinema furious that the director had completely inverted the pro-Catholic message into an anti-Catholic one.

Sandybanks wrote: "or is it also mentioned in Mad World?"

Nah, it's just a thought that I had. I liked the idea, though, and thought you might too. :-)

Sandybanks wrote: "Don't they have it at Kinokuniya Ngee Ann City? I thought I saw a row of Everyman there, but that was a couple of years go."

Wow, I've never seen Everyman at Kino. I should go check. I have a couple of Everymans but got them from Amazon. I just love the binding and everything. They feel like "grown-up" books. :-)


message 8: by Grace Tjan (new)

Grace Tjan "It was, unfortunately, quite bad. I saw it with a Catholic friend who came out of the cinema furious that the director had completely inverted the pro-Catholic message into an anti-Catholic one."

I agree. That was the impression that I got too. I must check out the BBC one. Jeremy Irons is always worth watching.

"Nah, it's just a thought that I had. I liked the idea, though, and thought you might too. :-)"

I like it. : )

"Wow, I've never seen Everyman at Kino."

Really? My memory must be playing tricks on me. :)

Everymans are great for all the reasons that you mentioned. I also like their size as it fits well in my hands and really handy to carry around. I have only a few as they're quite rare here (shipping cost from Amazon to Indonesia plus tax is expensive!). A whole shelf of them in the library must look great.


message 9: by Ellen (new)

Ellen Excellent review, Sandy! Thanks so very much.


message 10: by Grace Tjan (new)

Grace Tjan Ellen wrote: "Excellent review, Sandy! Thanks so very much."

Thanks, Ellen. I'm glad that you enjoy my bit of doggerel.


message 11: by Majenta (new)

Majenta Well done!


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