Jeanette’s review of Prisoners of Geography: Ten Maps That Tell You Everything You Need to Know About Global Politics > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Cher (new)

Cher Sounds fantastic! Thank you for the recommendation. I look forward to getting to this one.


message 2: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Great review, Jeanette! Thanks for the recommendation. This looks like a book I'd truly enjoy :)


message 3: by Lisa (new)

Lisa Thank you for the insightful review!


message 4: by Jeanette (new)

Jeanette You are welcome, Lisa.

Everyone in North America, Middle East should have the Russia chapter as a required reading. Obama certainly didn't read that chapter.


message 5: by Christy (new)

Christy Thanks for pointing us to this great resource! Definitely TBR. I don't think I've ever learned as much from any experience as I did from a single undergrad Political Geography class. OTOH, over my almost 30 years of teaching, we've gone from most K-16 classrooms having at least one serious map to many rooms without any.


message 6: by Jeanette (new)

Jeanette The first things I taught my Grandkids in a toddler but "formal" manner were all on maps. First a 50 state USA puzzle one I have that has tiny but sturdy wooden pieces and then on to the round and elemental globe. The names may change, but the nations as entities, much more rarely. FOR REASONS.

If you don't know "what" is "where"- you just DO NOT know.

When they quit teaching geography in grade school classrooms, I knew the downhill slope was increased tenfold. GPS has actually made those who KNOW their geography, forgetful of its largest lessons.


message 7: by HBalikov (new)

HBalikov Jeanette wrote: "The first things I taught my Grandkids in a toddler but "formal" manner were all on maps. First a 50 state USA puzzle one I have that has tiny but sturdy wooden pieces and then on to the round and ..."

"GPS has actually made those who KNOW their geography, forgetful of its largest lessons."

Yes, something like not being able to see the forest for the trees immediately at hand.


message 8: by Jeanette (last edited Mar 10, 2019 03:38PM) (new)

Jeanette Far more than that factor, HBalikov are several others much wider and more important to outcome factors. The larger (probably largest actually) danger is thinking/ believing that the tech and "authority" of human knowledge/ invention/ hubris of homo sapiens intelligence of elites and government will surmount the reality of the physicality and the practical applications of that physicality.

It never will.

The "authority" always knows last too (and too late always) how badly the "real" exists. Always 4 steps behind in their condescension of having all the answers. And far too late for it to do anything but regress to the real existing state of structures and placements as they exist and will contain to exist for majority of the populations in those placements.

It's not only missing the trees that becomes the homo sapiens primarily governmental/ organizational problem at all. It's when the elites who run it no longer know what a tree does or how it works or what it actually looks like in individual reality. Or what is optimal for it to grow, or what it needs to produce leaves and seeds. Trees need several factors you can list. Humans need families. Not villages.


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