Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies’s review of Dumplin' (Dumplin' #1) > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Carmen (new)

Carmen Wow, I'm so sorry to hear this. :( Thanks for reviewing this, Khanh.


Alienor ✘ French Frowner ✘ Great review. These quotes make my head spin. UGH. I agree, you just can't pick your message, and this book seems really hypocritical. Off tbr.


message 3: by Katherine (new)

Katherine I hate body-shaming, period. Look, all sizes are beautiful, and it's just so hypocritical when I see "larger" girls , per se, slam skinny women because they're skinny. It's not a good message to send to young girls, either.

>:(.


message 4: by Becky (new)

Becky Leigh I really thought that this was going to be a gread book about body-positivity!! Those quotes make me literally cringe. Your review is great!


message 5: by Vicky Marie (new)

Vicky Marie I was looking forward to this one, but body-shaming of any kind grates on my nerves. Plus those quotes make it clear that I won't like Willow.


message 6: by Catty-cat (new)

Catty-cat When you write it like this, you are right, she is quite judgemental and mean (i didn't mind it so much as I know I am extremely judgemental inside my head myself :p ).
But mostly I thought the book was meh, supposedly all those tough subject (body image, grief, friendship etc) and not once did I feel anything for the book.


message 7: by Roksana (new)

Roksana Well said! Agree on all counts ;)


message 8: by Matthew (new)

Matthew God, this sounds awful. And Willowdean? Seriously?


message 9: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca I was toying with the idea of reading this book, but I'm a bit sensitive to this particular topic and from what you've said it doesn't seem like it handles it in the best way. I think I'll steer clear. Thanks, Khanh.


message 10: by O.R. (new)

O.R. "How dare you not accept my size, while I judge everybody around me?!" yeah, no. Ugh.


Mia (Parentheses Enthusiast) Wow, that MC does seem like quite the mean girl. Hopefully your next book is better!


message 12: by Belinda (new)

Belinda I'm so glad I had no interest in reading this, because that disability shaming would have made me destroy the book. I love how bullying a disabled girl is lame, not because of the fact that they're bullying her (which she condones) but because they got the name wrong. As a disabled person, that makes me so mad.


message 13: by Lauren (new)

Lauren AKA randomreader I am interested in this book, but I'll also try not to let the hype get to me. It really bothers me there is body shaming in a book that is supposed to be body positive.


message 14: by Nasty Lady MJ (new)

Nasty Lady MJ Thank you for feeling the same way I felt like. Honestly, I really didn't get the hype of this one. It got marginally better as it went on, but I still didn't like it. The description made it seem like they were going go more the route of Pitch Perfect or Bridesmaids than Twilight. Unfortunately, it was just like Twilight minus the vampire and a heavier Bella.


message 15: by Pamela (new)

Pamela Actually, Willowdean's nastiness coming out was one of the reasons I loved the book so much. I think that in literature, especially YA, there's a tendency to beatify the put-upon fat kid. To make them kind and perfect and unworthy of criticism. Willow is ... a teen girl. Teen girls, no matter their size, can be really flipping nasty.

And as someone who is a bit smaller, I didn't feel that there was any skinny shaming at all. It's hard not to be bitter when people constantly tell you that you're not worth crap because of your size.
I really enjoy books that have so-called "unlikable" MCs. That means they're human.


message 16: by Nadia (new)

Nadia Uhlenhaker Won't even bother reading after this review.


Marie -The Reading Otter I already wasn't that interested in reading this book, but you've made it more evident that it's not worth my time.


message 18: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie Damn, this book was in September's OwlCrate.


message 19: by Mitticus (new)

Mitticus Looks like a mashup between Queen Size and Beautiful Girl. Though Pamela makes very good points.


message 20: by Jessie (new)

Jessie I read the first chapter of this book and decided to give up, I couldn't stand the main character


message 21: by Teghan (new)

Teghan this sounds horrific. I'm always looking for fat heroines in my lit (being one myself), but rule one of Fat Bitch Culture is don't drag down other fat women (or skinny women). Thanks for the warning, I'll be skipping this one


message 22: by Jessica (new)

Jessica John I was never interested in this book anyway, but reading your review just strengthens my resolve! Great review, as always ;)


message 23: by Laura (new)

Laura Damn here I was hoping for a body positive book. Thanks for recommending an alternative though. Will go check future perfect out.


message 24: by KL (new)

KL (Cat) Oh, I'm really glad that you felt the same way as I did! Some people commented on my review that Willowdean's nastiness makes her human, which I think is utter bullshit.


message 25: by KL (new)

KL (Cat) Like yeah, you're human alright, but a nasty one so I totally can't relate to you feeling sorry for yourself for your lack of friends or positive relationships in your life when you deserve it.


message 26: by Natalie (new)

Natalie Monroe I'm so glad I'm not the only one who thinks Willowdean is a fucknuckle.


message 27: by Jasmine (new)

Jasmine "The nicknmae thing was pretty lame if you think about it. Frankenstien was the doctor, not the monster."

Wooooooow. I'm all up for dark humour (if it's done right), but even I have to say that this is a new low. Sounds like this book has the same "body positivity" attitude Tumblr has. -_-


message 28: by O.R. (new)

O.R. ^


message 29: by O.R. (last edited Oct 01, 2015 06:44PM) (new)

O.R. KL wrote: "Oh, I'm really glad that you felt the same way as I did! Some people commented on my review that Willowdean's nastiness makes her human, which I think is utter bullshit."

There are nasty and not nasty humans so what's the point O.o I think people have issues with distinguishing between being human and being an ass.


message 30: by Runningrabbit (new)

Runningrabbit Ha ha - it's great to get all that reader's angst out somewhere... I have to say I've put up a couple of slugging it reviews lately, and I definitely perk my ears up in joy afterward :)


message 31: by Sakina (new)

Sakina I was really looking forward to this book but after your review I am not sure anymore since the quotes you put up are a refection of the character and she doesn't seem someone I would like.


message 32: by Andrea (last edited Oct 02, 2015 02:42PM) (new)

Andrea Luhman And Khanh save's me again! Thank you for the honesty in your reviews.


message 33: by Jenny (new)

Jenny Martin I totally respect the point of view in this review, but at the same time, I felt differently about Will. I think it’s because everyone brings their own perspectives, ideals, memories and experiences to the table, when reading a book. In my case, I thought Willowdean was breath of fresh air. She wasn't perfect. She had flawed thought patterns...some of the same thought patterns I see in my students at my school, in my library. And over the course of the novel, Willowdean grows and her perceptions change, just as some of my students’ thought patterns changed (and me, too!). For example, Will realizes that her awful perceptions about the girls are wrong, and she realizes she has some major growing up to do. Lastly, I loved that Willowdean's confidence wavered. She wasn't flawless and perfect all the time. She seemed very human and believable to me because she had lapses in judgment and flawed moments. She struggled with them, and seeing that was refreshing for me. I walked away feeling empowered. I realized...it's okay for me to make mistakes. It's okay that my perceptions of myself are fluid, moving up and down. I can have a moment of weakness and failure and error and not love my body. But then I can remember to embrace it, and grow in maturity, and love myself fully. For me, that was the whole point of the book. Failing at first, then learning to accept and embrace ourselves and also, others. To me, learning to erase old perceptions and replace them with new ones seemed a big part of Dumplin’. Again, just my opinion. I totally respect your feelings about not liking Willowdean (and I can see why she wasn’t your cup of tea), but I had a different take on her. In fact, I loved her. And in a way, isn’t that the beauty of books? We can all have our own unique experience with them, which is pretty awesome. (And librarian me hopes your next read hits all the right notes for you!!! And I'm excited to add Future Perfect to my TBR list.)


message 34: by Caroline (new)

Caroline I just finished this and you absolutely nailed this review! Such a hypocritical character. Always shaming others to make herself feel better eugh


message 35: by Kerry (new)

Kerry Hunter As a currently overweight girl who was previously scarily anorexic, I'm gonna give this a pass based on these quotes. Disgusting things to say. Was hoping for a fiction novel about body positivity, not this vile excuse.


message 36: by kate (new)

kate nichols hallo, ur ratings have helped me so much!!! u are freaking funny. please add me as ur friend *getting down on hands and knees* pleaaaaaaase iwould be so honored!


message 37: by Drew (new)

Drew I just finished reading this and agree with your review so much.


message 38: by Jennifer (new)

Jennifer I love how we all read thins differently. While I was dismayed that Willowdean was so judgemental, it didn't turn me off for a few reasons. First, when I was a teen I was too skinny but I have buck teeth; I was the type to think "I'm ugly but at least I'm not fat." Now that I'm 37 I'm fat and ugly and I catch myself being judgemental all the time. Judging people including one's self is such a part of society it is a hard habit to break and really does take effort. I'm trying and, from my reading, Willowdean is too. It may not be written explicitly but it seems to me that she does have a shift in attitude in the way she looks at people and the focus is less on how others stack up to her, but how she feels inside.
As for the "nothing happens" comment, well some readers prefer more plot-driven work than others and if you dislike the character as much as you did I can see why the character-driven aspect wasn't enough for you.


message 39: by K (new)

K Wow. What a bummer to read this review. Thanks for bringing this up. I'm undecided on whether I still want to read this book...


message 40: by Nicola (new)

Nicola I get what you are saying, but as a teenager reading this it's the truth of what happens today in our schools no matter how "promising" they are about bullying and all that kind of stuff. It sheds some needed light on how shitty our society is and our impacts on our self and others.
Just sayin' :|


message 41: by sky (new)

sky I understand this perspective of the book but in the paragraph/inner dialogue going on in the MC's mind, it states that she's 'ashamed to think that way about ____' and such. I don't have the book on me atm so I can't quote it but she does point out disclaimers before she explains her judgement.


message 42: by Kelly (new)

Kelly The MC buys into judgmental high school BS, even as she critiques it, even as she suffers the effects of it. It's a very nuanced portrayal of a teen girl and I thought it was brilliant.


message 43: by Ashling (new)

Ashling "I want her to grow the fuck up and get over it." That's pretty much what she does - that's the whole point of the book. You seem to be guilty of the old "pick and choose" yourself with those quotes. Those are all from the beginning, you left out the ones towards the end after she's grown the fuck up, knows Millie and Amanda are beautiful, realizes she was a dick to El. It's a pity you have turned so many off the book by choosing only negative quotes out of context.


message 44: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Cameron Dumplin was never going to please everybody, but it's a start. Will is a flawed character but I'll be damned if any teenager isn't at least a little selfish or judgmental or mean. Women are pitted against each other from birth and that isn't an easy behaviour to overcome. The character developed throughout the novel in a way I felt pretty authentic. I see how you pointed out the "love triangle" but I never saw it that way. Again, teenagers are callous and in matters of the heart can be pretty inept but God, the point was that this girl went from never seeing herself as worthy of romantic attention to trying to decide between something safer, something she felt her community could accept, and a person she felt like she couldn't coexist with or deserve. The major theme wasn't love, or sex, and the takeaway message wasn't here's how to string two people along but instead that it can be hard to go for something you're conditioned to think isn't yours for the taking. Dumplin gets 5 stars from me and I'll practically throw this book at every teen I cross paths with. Characters aren't all sunshine and cutesy moments, and power to the novelist who includes the thought processes you found so offensive because the author doesn't defend them but instead is honest with her audience in the way a teenager would be. /endrant


message 45: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca Cameron Dumplin was never going to please everybody, but it's a start. Will is a flawed character but I'll be damned if any teenager isn't at least a little selfish or judgmental or mean. Women are pitted against each other from birth and that isn't an easy behaviour to overcome. The character developed throughout the novel in a way I felt pretty authentic. I see how you pointed out the "love triangle" but I never saw it that way. Again, teenagers are callous and in matters of the heart can be pretty inept but God, the point was that this girl went from never seeing herself as worthy of romantic attention to trying to decide between something safer, something she felt her community could accept, and a person she felt like she couldn't coexist with or deserve. The major theme wasn't love, or sex, and the takeaway message wasn't here's how to string two people along but instead that it can be hard to go for something you're conditioned to think isn't yours for the taking. Dumplin gets 5 stars from me and I'll practically throw this book at every teen I cross paths with. Characters aren't all sunshine and cutesy moments, and power to the novelist who includes the thought processes you found so offensive because the author doesn't defend them but instead is honest with her audience in the way a teenager would be. /endrant


message 46: by Bryson (new)

Bryson I respectfully disagree with you @Khahn. Being slightly overweight myself, not to mention a teenager, I can confirm that the things your are quoting in your review are some of the things that I think up about certain people too. And hey, maybe the main character didn't mean those things in a rude way. Maybe she was just giving her honest opinion on what she was seeing, just like how you have your honest opinion on this book.

And I disagree with all of you who say you 'dislike' or 'can't stand' the main character. She was one of the main reasons I kept reading. Like I have mentioned, I'm overweight. I might not be a girl, but this book still touches base with me. And this book is right, it's never easy. When I walk into a room it feels like all eyes are on me. When I wear a swimming outfit it feels like I'm out of place. Just like Willowdean. Being heavier, larger, overweight, FAT-- or however you wish to call it, isn't easy. But unless we work to lose the weight, we fleet used to it. And for all of you that say, "This book fat-shames" or "This books isn't 'body positive'. BOO HOO. Society is never going to stop fat-shaming all together. It what people do. There's probably never going to be a stop to it. So, the only thing for us fat people to do is lift our chins and move on. I appreciate you trying to keep fat-shaming controlled, but most people have come to terms with it.

In my opinion, this book is amazing. If you are thinking about reading this, I fully and whole heartedly suggest you do. Granted, it is a tiny bit slow, but the plot is great. It really brings to light what it's like being overweight in a society full of 'Perfection' and 'Beauty Queens'.


Khanh, first of her name, mother of bunnies I'm glad you enjoyed it.


message 48: by Oli (new)

Oli Ahh thank you so much hun you helped me out with my essay with your clear points on the book relating to wills personality and issues (I agree I never liked will plus the writing in this book was very horrible most lines from the beginning were repeated near the middle / end like the author became lazy and gave up on the story)


message 49: by YA (new)

YA Booklover Was just about to read this until I saw your review. There's 10 hours of my life back...


message 50: by 5th (new)

5th You nailed it. The main character was terrible. She prejudged everyone she met and blamed all of her problems on her weight.


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