Mimi’s review of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Other Tales of Terror > Likes and Comments

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message 1: by Evgeny (new)

Evgeny They really knew how to write horror in Victorian England. Modern horror mostly relies on shock factor while these guys wrote really creepy stories.


message 2: by Mimi (new)

Mimi I don't know about that. Shock factors define the whole genre, past and present. Stevenson, along with Mary Shelley and Bram Stoker, was well-known in his time for pushing boundaries (and testing Victorian sensibilities), and that played a huge part in his stories selling so well.


message 3: by Evgeny (new)

Evgeny Mimi wrote: "I don't know about that. Shock factors define the whole genre, past and present. Stevenson, along with Mary Shelley and Bram Stoker, was well-known in his time for pushing boundaries (and testing V..."

I am not saying all the horror offerings from Victorian time and modern are like what I said, but I am still convinced some of the Stoker (for example) stories are scarer than most of King's - again as an example. Especially considering the time they were written.


message 4: by Mimi (new)

Mimi Perhaps it comes down to a matter of personal taste? Personally I find many books, both contemporary and Victorian, under the horror label not all that scary. The only exception is maybe William Peter Blatty.


message 5: by Evgeny (new)

Evgeny I agree about the majority of the horror book not being scary. I only read Exorcist from the author you mentioned. What else did you read from him?


message 6: by Mimi (new)

Mimi I've also only read the Exorcist (half of it, I should really finish the other half). His other books looks to be more on the side of suspense/thriller than horror.


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