Nataliya’s review of Persuasion > Likes and Comments

120 likes · 
Comments Showing 1-50 of 53 (53 new)    post a comment »

message 1: by Katy (new)

Katy I've been a curmudgeon since I was in my 20s, so *shrug* But a lot of it is the culture - I mean, it used to be that if you weren't married off by the time you were 16, you were in danger of becoming an old spinster by 19... O.O And yet, when I got married at 19, I was told "You're WAY TOO YOUNG." Well, based upon "traditional family values," I really was not (yes I was)...


The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) Wait...who's a Curmudgeon?


message 3: by Katy (new)

Katy I, Curmudgeon wrote: "Wait...who's a Curmudgeon?"

You, me and Nataliya, at the very least... ;-)


message 4: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya I, Curmudgeon wrote: "Wait...who's a Curmudgeon?"

Good question ;)




message 5: by Katy (new)

Katy I want to be the type who sits on the porch with a shotgun ... I want kids to dare each other to try to sneak onto my lawn, because I'm the "old witch" who will curse them if I catch them at it. I want to be the type that makes kids shit their pants if I come out the door ... MAUAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!


The Pirate Ghost (Formerly known as the Curmudgeon) I like that cat!


message 7: by Katy (last edited Sep 25, 2012 12:17PM) (new)

Katy Kat wrote: "Thanks for another fun review, Nataliya! Since I live in the boondocks, I never get to yell, "Get off my lawn!" ;)"

I've never had to, but once I was sitting here reading and saw a couple kids standing out on the street looking at the duplex in which I live. They slowly started creeping up toward it - I think they were thinking they might try to break in, since I leave the window open all the time (hey, there's almost always someone here), but didn't realize I was in here. I watched them slowly getting closer and closer until they were about 10 feet away, at which point I popped up by the window and called out to them: "Help you, boys?" They stared at me, stared at each other, and got the hell outta Dodge...
X-D Little idiots...


message 8: by Jeffrey (new)

Jeffrey Keeten Great stuff!


message 9: by Katy (new)

Katy Kat wrote: "My daughters would be too scared to trick-or-treat at your house, Katy. Unless you were giving out chocolate. :D"

Meh, I only bought candy and hung out here to hand 'em out once, and got one set of kids and one set of adults much later at night. People around here are insular - if they don't know you, or if you're not one of "their people" (church people, a particular race or ethnicity, etc.), then they pretty much just ignore you. *shrug*


message 10: by Dyuti (new)

Dyuti Love the cranky old woman cartoons that u used! Very funny... Lol :D


message 11: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Thanks, guys!

@Dyuti - Maxine may be old, but she's timeless.


message 12: by Ceecee (new)

Ceecee "Mentally eleven" lol
Yes!



message 13: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Ceecee wrote: ""Mentally eleven" lol
Yes!
"


That's right! And my inner eleven-year-old loves this gif :)


message 14: by Katy (new)

Katy I'm so awkward that if I tried to do that, I'd miss my own hand...


message 15: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Well, I have to be at least somewhat coordinated, having to do surgeries and all. So of course I just had the most fun imitating her in this gif - whee-hee!


message 16: by Ceecee (new)

Ceecee Katy wrote: "I'm so awkward that if I tried to do that, I'd miss my own hand..."

it'll just take some practice ;)


message 17: by Katy (new)

Katy Ceecee wrote: "Katy wrote: "I'm so awkward that if I tried to do that, I'd miss my own hand..."

it'll just take some practice ;)"


Yeah, that's what my best buddy in high school kept telling me, but I continued to FAIL at high-fives. *shrug*


message 18: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Katy wrote: "Ceecee wrote: "Katy wrote: "I'm so awkward that if I tried to do that, I'd miss my own hand..."

it'll just take some practice ;)"

Yeah, that's what my best buddy in high school kept telling me, b..."


hey, maybe you weren't the one failing at high fives. Maybe everyone else was failing YOU!


message 19: by Katy (new)

Katy No, I'm willing to own up to the fact that I'm a complete klutz. *shrug*


message 20: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Katy wrote: "No, I'm willing to own up to the fact that I'm a complete klutz. *shrug*"

Aw, Katy, this 'flaw' would make you a perfect choice to be a paranormal romance YA heroine ;) Please watch out for sparkly vampires and such in your vicinity.


message 21: by Katy (new)

Katy Nataliya wrote: "Katy wrote: "No, I'm willing to own up to the fact that I'm a complete klutz. *shrug*"

Aw, Katy, this 'flaw' would make you a perfect choice to be a paranormal romance YA heroine ;) Please watch o..."


Vampire? Where?? WHERE!!!! *desperately seeking vampire so I can read forever...*


message 22: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Katy wrote: "*desperately seeking vampire so I can read forever...* "

Ahahahaha! That sounds like the perfect personal ad ;)


message 23: by Katy (new)

Katy Nataliya wrote: "Katy wrote: "*desperately seeking vampire so I can read forever...* "

Ahahahaha! That sounds like the perfect personal ad ;)"


I've been looking for more than a year already.... *dejected*


message 24: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Ah Katy, you know that the only acceptable way of meeting an immortal/undead creature that may give you some of that immortality is to enroll in high school and preferably take Biology.


message 25: by Katy (new)

Katy Nataliya wrote: "Ah Katy, you know that the only acceptable way of meeting an immortal/undead creature that may give you some of that immortality is to enroll in high school and preferably take Biology."

Yeah, meeting a LAME immortal... Why would I want to meet some wimpy, weepy LAME immortal when I could have someone like.... oh, I dunno, Lestat... the ORIGINAL Lestat... the "everyone else can go to hell" Lestat...


message 26: by Slavomíra (new)

Slavomíra Nemčíková you can´t blame Jane Austen that she said Anne was old, she lived in 19th century and some girls were marrying in age of 15! Even in Pride & Prejudice Miss Lucas said that she´s old and has to marry to Collins and she was only 27!


message 27: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Slavomíra wrote: "you can´t blame Jane Austen that she said Anne was old, she lived in 19th century and some girls were marrying in age of 15! Even in Pride & Prejudice Miss Lucas said that she´s old and has to marr..."

Oh, I'm not blaming Ms. Austen at all. I'm shaking my head in amused disapproval from the height of 200 years that separate us, well aware that things changed between then and now. I do appreciate the more mature viewpoint we get with Anne.


message 28: by Dstny5233 (new)

Dstny5233 Nataliya, you do realize that in Jane Austen's day, you were supposed to be married young... teenage young? Anne is younger than I am (1/2 a decade younger) but I realize when the book was written a woman's place was different... don't like it at all! still, you have to read a book with the writer's perception in mind.


message 29: by Dstny5233 (new)

Dstny5233 Nataliya, you do realize that in Jane Austen's day, you were supposed to be married young... teenage young? Anne is younger than I am (1/2 a decade younger) but I realize when the book was written a woman's place was different... don't like it at all! still, you have to read a book with the writer's perception in mind.


message 30: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Lydia wrote: "One: Jane Austen is dead! Two: by "past her youth and bloom" she means "your eggs are dyin boo get that man to make dem babies!""

One: So you mean I can never get invited to Jane Austen's 240th birthday???!!!! Oh the horror!
Two: The inevitable turn of this discussion to talking about Anne Elliot's ovaries is funny. Just spare me the conversation about her future pelvic organ prolapse and we're cool.

Dstny5233 wrote: "Nataliya, you do realize that in Jane Austen's day, you were supposed to be married young... teenage young? Anne is younger than I am (1/2 a decade younger) but I realize when the book was written ..."

Side effect of internet: inability to write a phrase in jest without an inevitable explanation of how you did not understand something. Yes, I realize that societal norms were different over 200 years ago. I am really not as dense as people apparently think I must be. I am actually aware that there is a context in which people read literary works of the past centuries. And yet, really, I am still able to express my joking disdain at the societal norms and conventions that portray a 27-year-old as a withered old hag.


message 31: by Jenny (new)

Jenny Maloney I am actually aware that there is a context in which people read literary works of the past centuries. And yet, really, I am still able to express my joking disdain at the societal norms and conventions that portray a 27-year-old as a withered old hag.

Actually, I think Jane Austen was in on the withered old hag joke too. At the turn of the nineteenth century, the actual average marrying age was in the mid-20s. (I got that both from domesticity research in college and the internetz.) So, some of the "Anne-you-dried-up-old bag" is tongue in cheek, since Anne would've been on the shelf for a grand total of *maybe* two years.

I think Austen would have approved this review. ;-)


message 32: by Nandakishore (new)

Nandakishore Varma I love Austen and the underplayed sarcasm of her narrative voice. Fine review, Nataliya.

BTW, I'm 50, and still consider myself young! ;)


message 33: by Marte (new)

Marte Three stars? That's insane! This book is so beautiful.


message 34: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Marte wrote: "Three stars? That's insane! This book is so beautiful."

I agree, it's a lovely book, and I can easily give it 3.5 stars (I usually round down when I assign star ratings, not up). I objectively see how good it is; unfortunately it didn't grab me on the same level as the other similar books from the same time period.


message 35: by Alan (new)

Alan Persuasion is five stars, sorry. For one thing, this is the first, best portrait of Male Vanity in English. In the US, the Mary Tyler Moore character of Ted Knight is a distant mirror (allusion intended) of Sir Walter (isn't it) Elliot.


message 36: by Marte (new)

Marte Nataliya wrote: "Marte wrote: "Three stars? That's insane! This book is so beautiful."

I agree, it's a lovely book, and I can easily give it 3.5 stars (I usually round down when I assign star ratings, not up). I o..."


I get that, I'm like that with Emma, or Northanger abbey for instance! :)


message 37: by Katy (new)

Katy Alan wrote: "Persuasion is five stars, sorry. For one thing, this is the first, best portrait of Male Vanity in English. In the US, the Mary Tyler Moore character of Ted Knight is a distant mirror (allusion i..."

Oh, if only everyone had the same opinions, the same life path, and thought the same as everyone else, what a wonderful world... wait, no. BORING.


It is the differences in opinion and life that make things interesting. Embrace it.


message 38: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Alan wrote: "Persuasion is five stars, sorry. For one thing, this is the first, best portrait of Male Vanity in English. In the US, the Mary Tyler Moore character of Ted Knight is a distant mirror (allusion i..."

Ah, male vanity. Made me want to reach into the book pages and give Mr. Elliot a nice good come-to-your-senses shaking.


message 39: by Alan (new)

Alan Katy wrote: "Alan wrote: "Persuasion is five stars, sorry. For one thing, this is the first, best portrait of Male Vanity in English. In the US, the Mary Tyler Moore character of Ted Knight is a distant mirro..."
I'm not against differences of opinion. My two recent books are on G Bruno, whose opinions got him burned at the stake. But literary accomplishment is not only a matter of opinion. Humor and wit, I find, are seriously undervalued by modern readers, especially Americans, who think, under the influence of some very bad non-readers who run schools, great lit is "serious." We even call it that. On that scale, a dogtrot book that justifies suicide,* like The Bell Jar, gets a high ranking, is taught everywhere to kids who do NOT have to learn how suicide (and Plath's own attempted killing of her two kids as well) is so admirable.
I do not know of a previous portrait of male vanity, and certainly nothing as hilarious and riveting. Chaucer, Shakespeare, Restoration satirists, Moliere, Sterne, Pushkin, Byron, Twain, EF Benson, Dickinson, Frost (especially in conversation), Bellow, Updike: all very funny. Laugh a bit; it's less "boring" (to use your word).
*I call it this on the basis of its two first reviewers, two well-read women, to whom the author was required to send her efforts (on a grant). They were against publishing it, and were right.


message 40: by Lucinda (new)

Lucinda … except this book was written in the early 19th century and women of nearly thirty who couldn't work as governesses because they were too upper class didn't have many future prospects, unless they got married. I am about to read this book, so I cannot truly disagree and express my opinion, but I tend to get annoyed by people who express judgments without putting things into its proper context. Also: do all heroines HAVE to be pretty and charming? If they all were, I think books would be pretty dull and far from reality, whereas Jane Austen actually attempts to depict the society of her time, so that's why I don't quite get your review. PS: Jane Eyre is supposed to be very plain, yet she's one of the most dashing female protagonists of European literature. Brave, and clever.


message 41: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Lucinda wrote: "I am about to read this book, so I cannot truly disagree and express my opinion, but I tend to get annoyed by people who express judgments without putting things into its proper context."

Yet you clearly disagree even when you say you truly can't, and express your annoyance without having read the book or clearly without understanding that my dismay at Anne's 'respectable' age is clearly expressed as a joke by someone who is older than Anne. Let me explain: I'm really not an idiot; I understand the difference in societal worldview a change over time; and I am just having fun with the idea that to modern readers seems quite silly.

I, by the way, tend to get annoyed when people don't recognize my joking tone and instead proceed to educate me on the quite basic things. I guess tone is one of those things that doesn't universally transmit via the web.


message 42: by Teresa (last edited Feb 18, 2014 09:05PM) (new)

Teresa Great review, Nataliya. This is my favorite Austen and I love it for all the reasons you state, esp. for its "sarcastic commentary" and "subdued epistolary" passion -- ah, that letter!


message 43: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Teresa wrote: "Great review, Nataliya. This is my favorite Austen and I love it for all the reasons you state, esp. for its "sarcastic commentary" and "subdued epistolary" passion -- ah, that letter!"

Thanks, Teresa!


message 44: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Camelia Rose wrote: "In 1800s, yes being a 27 years old unmarried women was indeed considered "old""

I know that. It's still quite silly.


message 45: by Sarah (new)

Sarah I didn't read through every single comment, so I apologize if someone already added this. Persuasion was published in 1818. During this time, the life expectancy of a British woman was between 40 and 50, so let's just go with 45. Anne, being 27, is approximately 60% done with her life, assuming she lives to average expectancy. Today, the life expectancy for any British person, male or female, is 84. If someone today were to be about 60% done with their life, again, assuming average expectancy, they would be just over 50. I think that most people would consider being 50 as "past one's prime". So yes, by today's standards, it seems ridiculous to consider a twenty-something as old, but it doesn't seem so outlandish when you put it into context.


message 46: by eva ortiz (new)

eva ortiz How old are u


message 47: by Lynne (new)

Lynne King An excellent review Nataliya!


message 48: by Nataliya (new)

Nataliya Lynne wrote: "An excellent review Nataliya!"

Thanks, Lynne!


message 49: by Natalie (new)

Natalie I love this comment section. And the review. And Maxine. And the book, of course. (not quite as good as Jane Eyre, but still enjoyable)


message 50: by Dheeraj (new)

Dheeraj Nakhwa Totally agree with Sarah, exactly my point, considering the time at which this novel was written, she was well past her prime.


« previous 1
back to top