Quotes About Travel

Quotes tagged as "travel" (showing 241-270 of 2,326)
Ira Levin
“Anyone who needs more than one suitcase is a tourist, not a traveler”
Ira Levin, Rosemary's Baby

Bashō Matsuo
“Every day is a journey, and the journey itself is home.”
Bashō Matsuo

Rudyard Kipling
“All good people agree,
And all good people say,
All nice people, like Us, are We
And every one else is They:
But if you cross over the sea,
Instead of over the way,
You may end by (think of it!) looking on We
As only a sort of They!”
Rudyard Kipling, Debits And Credits

Roman Payne
“People wonder why so many writers come to live in Paris. I’ve been living ten years in Paris and the answer seems simple to me: because it’s the best place to pick ideas. Just like Italy, Spain.. or Iran are the best places to pick saffron. If you want to pick opium poppies you go to Burma or South-East Asia. And if you want to pick novel ideas, you go to Paris.”
Roman Payne, Crepuscule

Tasha Alexander
“At least as a single woman, I had time to pursue my own interests, read voraciously, and travel when opportunity presented.”
Tasha Alexander, And Only to Deceive

Vera Nazarian
“Whenever you go on a trip to visit foreign lands or distant places, remember that they are all someone's home and backyard.”
Vera Nazarian, The Perpetual Calendar of Inspiration

John Masefield
“Only the road and the dawn, the sun, the wind, and the rain,
And the watch fire under stars, and sleep, and the road again.

John Masefield

E.A. Bucchianeri
“It was exciting to be off on a journey she had looked forward to for months. Oddly, the billowing diesel fumes of the airport did not smell like suffocating effluence, it assumed a peculiar pungent scent that morning, like the beginning of a new adventure, if an adventure could exude a fragrance.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Brushstrokes of a Gadfly

ربعي المدهون
“أجمل ما في السفر ، هو تقلب مشاهده أمام المسافر مثل مواسم غير مستقرة”
ربعي المدهون, السيدة من تل أبيب

Roman Payne
“This was how it was with travel: one city gives you gifts, another robs you. One gives you the heart’s affections, the other destroys your soul. Cities and countries are as alive and feeling, as fickle and uncertain as people. Their degrees of love and devotion are as varying as with any human relation. Just as one is good, another is bad.”
Roman Payne, Cities & Countries

Albert Camus
“Any country where I am not bored is a country that teaches me nothing.”
Albert Camus

Bill  Murray
“You can handle just about anything that comes at you out on the road with a believable grin, common sense and whiskey.”
Bill Murray, Common Sense and Whiskey

Mark Twain
“One must travel, to learn. Every day, now, old Scriptural phrases that never possessed any significance for me before, take to themselves a meaning.”
Mark Twain, The Innocents Abroad

J.R.R. Tolkien
“Oh! That was poetry!" said Pippin. "Do you really mean to start before the break of day?”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

Henry Rollins
“Yeah, that’s my experience. Humbling to the point where you have major regrets about some of the stupid things you said, some of the things you thought were right. You keep going to these countries, and it’s like, you forgot the lesson from the last time. Because the first person you encounter kind of bitch-slaps you upside the head in the most wonderful, innocent way and you realize, God, I’m still an asshole. And this guy, by doing nothing except being broke and so incredibly polite—it takes you aback, you realize, I’m still not there yet. I still have like eight miles to go before I can even get into the parking lot of humility. I have to keep going back. It’s like going back to a chiropractor to get a readjustment. That’s me in Africa, that’s me in Southeast Asia. You come back humbled and you bring that into your life. It’s made me much more tolerant of other peoples—and I’m not saying I used to be a misogynist, or I used to be a racist, that was never my problem. But I can be extremely headstrong, impatient, rude. Like, “Hurry up, man. What’s your problem? Get out of my way.” That sentiment comes easy to me. Going to these countries, you realize none of that is necessary, none of it’s cool, it’s nothing Abraham Lincoln would do, and so why are you doing it? Those are the lessons I’ve learned.”
Henry Rollins

Michael Palin
“Night falls over Machu Picchu to the sound of Abba's 'Dancing Queen'.”
Michael Palin, Full Circle

Roman Payne
“With the need for the self in the time of another / I left my seaport grim and dear / knowing good work could be made / in the state governed by both Hope and Despair.”
Roman Payne

Sarah Glidden
“One thing that I love about traveling is feeling disoriented and removed from my comfort zone.”
Sarah Glidden, How to Understand Israel in 60 Days or Less

E.M. Forster
“How can the mind take hold of such a country? Generations of invaders have tried, but they remain in exile. The important towns they build are only retreats, their quarrels the malaise of men who cannot find their way home. India knows of their trouble. She knows of the whole world's trouble, to its uttermost depth. She calls "Come" through her hundred mouths, through objects ridiculous and august. But come to what? She has never defined. She is not a promise, only an appeal.”
E.M. Forster, A Passage to India: A Reader's Guide to Essential Criticism

Elizabeth Gilbert
“I had long ago learned that when you are the giant, alien visitor to a remote and foreign culture it is sort of your job to become an object of ridicule. It’s the least you can do, really, as a polite guest.”
Elizabeth Gilbert, Committed: A Skeptic Makes Peace with Marriage

Pascal Mercier
“Warum bedauern wir Leute, die nicht reisen können? Weil sie sich, indem sie sich äußerlich nicht ausbreiten können, auch innerlich nicht auszudehnen vermögen, sie können sich nicht vervielfältigen, und so ist ihnen die Möglichkeit genommen, weitläufige Ausflüge in sich selbst zu unternehmen und zu entdecken, wer und was anderes sie auch hätten werden können.”
Pascal Mercier

“But that’s the wonderful thing about foreign travel, suddenly you are five years old again. You can’t read anything, you have only the most basic sense of how things work, you can’t even reliably cross the street without endangering your life. Your whole existence becomes a series of interesting guesses.”
Bill Bryan

Lawrence Millman
“You are what you inhabit.”
Lawrence Millman, Last Places: A Journey in the North

“There's something in the act of setting out that renews me, that fills me with a feeling of possibility. On the road, I'm forced to rely on instinct and intuition, on the kindness of strangers, in ways that illuminate who I am, ways that shed light on my motivations, my fears.”
Andrew McCarthy, The Longest Way Home: One Man's Quest for the Courage to Settle Down

Mary Roach
“Every mode of travel has its signature mental aberration.”
Mary Roach, Packing for Mars: The Curious Science of Life in the Void

Robert Benchley
“Streets flooded. Please advise.”
Robert Benchley

Thor Heyerdahl
“Borders? I have never seen one. But I have heard they exist in the minds of some people.”
Thor Heyerdahl
tags: travel

Don DeLillo
“Air travel reminds us who we are. It’s the means by which we recognize ourselves as modern. The process removes us from the world and sets us apart from each other. We wander in the ambient noise, checking one more time for the flight coupon, the boarding pass, the visa. The process convinces us that at any moment we may have to submit to the force that is implied in all this, the unknown authority behind it, behind the categories, the languages we don’t understand. This vast terminal has been erected to examine souls.”
Don DeLillo, The Names

Paul Theroux
“There's always a way if you're not in a hurry.”
Paul Theroux, The Last Train to Zona Verde: My Ultimate African Safari

E.A. Bucchianeri
“Finding a taxi, she felt like a child pressing her nose to the window of a candy store as she watched the changing vista pass by while the twilight descended and the capital became bathed in a translucent misty lavender glow. Entering the city from that airport was truly unique. Charles de Gaulle, built nineteen miles north of the bustling metropolis, ensured that the final point of destination was veiled from the eyes of the traveller as they descended. No doubt, the officials scrupulously planned the airport’s location to prevent the incessant air traffic and roaring engines from visibly or audibly polluting the ambience of their beloved capital, and apparently, they succeeded. If one flew over during the summer months, the visitor would be visibly presented with beautifully managed quilt-like fields of alternating gold and green appearing as though they were tilled and clipped with the mathematical precision of a slide rule. The countryside was dotted with quaint villages and towns that were obviously under meticulous planning control. When the aircraft began to descend, this prevailing sense of exactitude and order made the visitor long for an aerial view of the capital city and its famous wonders, hoping they could see as many landmarks as they could before they touched ground, as was the usual case with other major international airports, but from this point of entry, one was denied a glimpse of the city below. Green fields, villages, more fields, the ground grew closer and closer, a runway appeared, a slight bump or two was felt as the craft landed, and they were surrounded by the steel and glass buildings of the airport. Slightly disappointed with this mysterious game of hide-and-seek, the voyager must continue on and collect their baggage, consoled by the reflection that they will see the metropolis as they make their way into town. For those travelling by road, the concrete motorway with its blue road signs, the underpasses and the typical traffic-logged hubbub of industrial areas were the first landmarks to greet the eye, without a doubt, it was a disheartening first impression. Then, the real introduction began. Quietly, and almost imperceptibly, the modern confusion of steel and asphalt was effaced little by little as the exquisite timelessness of Parisian heritage architecture was gradually unveiled. Popping up like mushrooms were cream sandstone edifices filigreed with curled, swirling carvings, gently sloping mansard roofs, elegant ironwork lanterns and wood doors that charmed the eye, until finally, the traveller was completely submerged in the glory of the Second Empire ala Baron Haussmann’s master plan of city design, the iconic grand mansions, tree-lined boulevards and avenues, the quaint gardens, the majestic churches with their towers and spires, the shops and cafés with their colourful awnings, all crowded and nestled together like jewels encrusted on a gold setting.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Brushstrokes of a Gadfly

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