Quotes About Zen Buddhism

Quotes tagged as "zen-buddhism" (showing 1-30 of 105)
Shunryu Suzuki
“A student, filled with emotion and crying, implored, "Why is there so much suffering?"

Suzuki Roshi replied, "No reason.”
Shunryu Suzuki, Zen Is Right Here: Teaching Stories and Anecdotes of Shunryu Suzuki, Author of "ZEN Mind, Beginner's Mind"

Shunryu Suzuki
“To have some deep feeling about Buddhism is not the point; we just do what we should do, like eating supper and going to bed. This is Buddhism.”
Shunryu Suzuki, Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind: Informal Talks on Zen Meditation and Practice

Shunryu Suzuki
“In the zazen posture, your mind and body have, great power to accept things as they are, whether agreeable or disagreeable.
In our scriptures (Samyuktagama Sutra, volume 33), it is said that there are four kinds of horses: excellent ones, good ones, poor ones, and bad ones. The best horse will run slow and fast, right and left, at the driver's will, before it sees the shadow of the whip; the second best will run as well as the first one does, just before the whip reaches its skin; the third one will run when it feels pain on its body; the fourth will run after the pain penetrates to the marrow of its bones. You can imagine how difficult it is for the fourth one to learn how to run!”
Shunryu Suzuki, Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind: Informal Talks on Zen Meditation and Practice

Shunryu Suzuki
“While you are continuing this practice, week after week, year after year, your experience will become deeper and deeper, and your experience will cover everything you do in your everyday life. The most important thing is to forget all gain
ing ideas, all dualistic ideas. In other words, just practice zazen in a certain posture. Do not think about anything. Just remain on your cushion without expecting anything. Then eventually you will resume your own true nature. That is to say, your own true nature resumes itself.”
Shunryu Suzuki, Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind: Informal Talks on Zen Meditation and Practice

Thich Nhat Hanh
“Do not lose yourself in the past. Do not lose yourself in the future. Do not get caught in your anger, worries, or fears. Come back to the present moment, and touch life deeply. This is mindfulness.”
Thich Nhat Hanh, The Heart of the Buddha's Teaching: Transforming Suffering into Peace, Joy, and Liberation

Sen no Rikyū
“How much does he lack himself who must have many things?”
Sen no Rikyū

“Let go or be dragged.”
Zen Proverb

Thich Nhat Hanh
“If you are lost in a forest at night, you can follow the North Star to find your way out. You follow the North Star, but your goal is to get back home; it’s not to arrive at the North Star.”
Thich Nhat Hanh, The Art of Power

Alan W. Watts
“We do not "come into" this world; we come out of it, as leaves from a tree. As the ocean "waves," the universe "peoples." Every individual is an expression of the whole realm of nature, a unique action of the total universe. This fact is rarely, if ever, experienced by most individuals. Even those who know it to be true in theory do not sense or feel it, but continue to be aware of themselves as isolated "egos" inside bags of skin.”
Alan W. Watts, The Book on the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are

Ana Claudia Antunes
“You don´t have to let it linger
Within the palm of your hand,
The tip's already in your finger:
All beginning comes to an end.”
Ana Claudia Antunes, A-Z of Happiness: Tips for Living and Breaking Through the Chain that Separates You from Getting That Dream Job

“Careful!
Even moonlit dewdrops,
If you’re lured to watch,
Are a wall before the Truth.
— Sogyo”
Sogyo

Alan Spence
“We die, he said.
We die, I said. And kn owing this how do we live?
Knowing this, we live.
We live.”
Alan Spence, Night Boat

Barry Graham
“Zen probably won’t solve a single one of our problems. What it might do is help us relate differently to what we consider problems.”
Barry Graham, Kill Your Self: Life After Ego

Barry Graham
“When we attach to a problem, we make the problem worse. When we attach to a solution, we make the problem worse.”
Barry Graham, Nothing Extra: Notes On the Zen Life (Zen for Real Life, #3

Alan Spence
“I had joked about my bones being found by the roadside. Notify the four winds. Up here i might never be found. Keen-eyed vultures would pick the bones clean. Wind and rain would bleach them and in time they'd dissolve into the earth.
I looked up, and a gust of wind swirled the mist, and i saw that glint of gold, so close now, just up ahead. one last effort, to haul and drag myself up over ragged rocks, and at last I stood, breath rasping, limbs shaking, my body one long ache, covered in grime and thick greasy sweat, in front of Hakuyu's cave. The patch of colour I'd seen was a simple bamboo blind, yellowed with age, and painted on it was the outline of a dragon, and the dragon's eye was a dot of gold. That was what had led me all this way.”
Alan Spence, Night Boat

Barry Graham
“Render unto meditation the things that are meditation’s, and unto medication the things that are medication’s.”
Barry Graham, Kill Your Self: Life After Ego

Thomas Merton
“As a matter of face, Zen is at present most fashionable in America among those who are least concerned with moral discipline. Zen has, indeed, become for us a symbol of moral revolt. It is true, the Zen-man's contempt for conventional and formalistic social custom is a healthy phenomenon, but it is healthy only because it presupposes a spiritual liberty based on freedom from passion, egotism and self-delusion. A pseudo-Zen attitude which seeks to justify a complete moral collapse with a few rationalizations based on the Zen Masters is only another form of bourgeois self-deception. It is not an expression of healthy revolt, but only another aspect of the same lifeless and inert conventionalism against which it appears to be protesting.”
Thomas Merton, Zen and the Birds of Appetite

Alan W. Watts
“We suffer from a hallucination, from a false and distorted sensation of our own existence as living organisms. Most of us have the sensation that "I myself" is a separate center of feeling and action, living inside and bounded by the physical body — a center which "confronts" an "external" world of people and things, making contact through the senses with a universe both alien and strange.”
Alan W. Watts, The Book on the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are

Alaric Hutchinson
“On my journey from the fantastical to the practical, spirituality has gone from being a mystical experience to something very ordinary and a daily experience. Many don’t want this, instead they prefer spiritual grandeur, and I believe that is what keeps enlightenment at bay. We want big revelations of complexity that validates our perceptions of the divine. What a let down it was to Moses when God spoke through a burning bush! But that is exactly the simplicity of it all. Our spiritual life is our ordinary life and it is very grounded in every day experience. For me, it is the daily practice of kindness, mindfulness, happiness, and peace.”
Alaric Hutchinson

Alan W. Watts
“God is the Self of the world, but you can't see God for the same reason that, without a mirror, you can't see your own eyes, and you certainly can't bite your own teeth or look inside your head. Your self is that cleverly hidden because it is God hiding.”
Alan W. Watts, The Book on the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are

Alan W. Watts
“[T]he less I preach, the more likely I am to be heard.”
Alan W. Watts, The Book on the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are

Alan W. Watts
“[F]ast intercommunication between points is making all points the same point.”
Alan W. Watts, The Book on the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are

Alan W. Watts
“When the outcome of a game is certain, we call it quits and begin another. This is why many
people object to having their fortunes told: not that fortunetelling is mere superstition or that the predictions would be horrible, but simply that the more surely the future is known, the less surprise and the less fun in living it.”
Alan W. Watts, The Book on the Taboo Against Knowing Who You Are

Musō Soseki
“Old age and death are in the natural course of things. There is nothing a doctor can do about them.”
Musō Soseki, Dialogues in a Dream

“Life's Journeys
Inward seeking moves towards being-time
Outward seeking journies among life's ornaments”
Earl R Smith II, PhD

“Asian philosophy and culture never endured an intellectual upheaval like the Cartesian split of mind and body that brought the so-called Enlightenment to the West. The consequent achievements of scientific method and the less fortunate by-products of secular self-interest together laid the groundwork, in Europe and America, for the personal psychology of psychoanalysis and psychotherapy.”
Polly Young-Eisendrath, Awakening and Insight: Zen Buddhism and Psychotherapy

“The only 'elephant' left in the room is love.”
Benjamin Aubrey Myers

Steve Hagen
“The buddha-dharma … is about directly seeing Truth, prior to forming any ideas about it. It is about responding to each particular situation as it comes … , not according to some … program of dos and don'ts.”
Steve Hagen, Buddhism Plain and Simple

Steve Hagen
“When we fancy ourselves to be a particular thing with a name, we see ourselves as we would a cork in a stream. What we do not realize is that there is only stream. What we fancy as particular is, from the first, only movement, change and flow.”
Steve Hagen, Buddhism Plain and Simple

Brian Spellman
“I haven't learned how to confront a problem by avoiding it.”
Brian Spellman

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