Yoga Philosophy Quotes

Quotes tagged as "yoga-philosophy" (showing 1-30 of 32)
Amit Ray
“We all are so deeply interconnected; we have no option but to love all.”
Amit Ray, Yoga and Vipassana: An Integrated Life Style

Yoga is the space where flower blossoms.
“Yoga is the space where flower blossoms.”
Amit Ray, Yoga The Science of Well-Being

Amit Ray
“When life is foggy, path is unclear and mind is dull, remember your breath. It has the power to give you the peace. It has the power to resolve the unsolved equations of life.”
Amit Ray, Beautify your Breath - Beautify your Life

Amit Ray
“Peace is the foundation of yoga. Karma yoga is the effort for bringing peace and happiness in the world.”
Amit Ray, Yoga The Science of Well-Being

Amit Ray
“Yoga is the process of eliminating pain – pain form the body, mind and the society.”
Amit Ray, Yoga The Science of Well-Being

Amit Ray
“The purpose of karma yoga is to transcend the bondage of selfish genes through the service of others.”
Amit Ray, Yoga The Science of Well-Being

Emma Mildon
“Spirituality is not a religion or a trend—it is a lifestyle.
It is a lifestyle of awareness that combines the understanding of faith, body, mind, and soul, allowing us to live modern-day enlightened lives in small and big ways.”
Emma Mildon, The Soul Searcher's Handbook: A Modern Girl's Guide to the New Age World

Amit Ray
“Teaching yoga itself is great karma yoga, because it reconnects people to the source.”
Amit Ray, Yoga The Science of Well-Being

Amit Ray
“The heart of a yogi should always bear good-will and thoughts that benefit others.”
Amit Ray, OM Sutra: The Pathway to Enlightenment

Michelle Moran
“Yoga is not something a person practices with music or mirrors or any other distraction. It's purpose is less about samyoga than it is about viyoga, which is to say, it is more about disconnecting than it is about connecting which many Westerners find strange, until they hear it explained. The reason a person practices every day is to disconnect from their deep connection to suffering.

The author of the ancient Yogatattva Upanishad believed that without the practice of yoga, it was entirely impossible to set the atman free. The atman, of course, is the soul. And just as the rani said, we are so burdened down by our daily worries that many of us have become no different than beasts. We walk around eating and drinking and caring very little about our purpose in this life. Some of us are not even very clever beasts. We are merely trudging through our work, yoked to some terrible master or job. The goal of yoga is to changed all of this; to remind the human who has become like an ox that their yoke and harness can be taken off, even if it's only for a few minutes a day, and that through silencing the mind, we can silence greed, and hunger, and desire as well.”
Michelle Moran, Rebel Queen

Amit Ray
“Sanskrit is a beautiful contextual language. It is called “Dev Bhasha” the language of the soul. Here, meanings of the words must come from the heart, from direct experience – dictionary meanings or static meanings have not much value. Meanings of the words vary depending on mind-set, time, location and culture. The words are made to expand the possibilities of the mind.”
Amit Ray, Yoga The Science of Well-Being

Amit Ray
“Yoga exercises are the best connecting tools for unity, human dignity, health, equality, global peace and compassion.”
Amit Ray, Yoga The Science of Well-Being

“Self-hatred is the inevitable byproduct of the culture of narcissism in which we all have been reared. We learn from day one how special and wonderful we are. Or conversely, and perhaps more pervasively, we do not learn this at all and instead are subjected to glorified views of others through the media whom we idealize and envy. At the root of it all are inappropriate expectations about life, about ourselves, and an overvaluation of self that breeds profound isolation.”
Melissa Grabau

“In our society, we often tend to ignore what our bodies are telling us and instead are encouraged to medicate the symptoms with sleeping pills, stool softeners, a few beers, and a burrito. The problem with this approach is that whatever your body is trying to tell you gets lost beneath your attempts to cover it up.”
Melissa Grabau, The Yoga of Food: Wellness from the Inside Out: Healing the Relationship with Food & Your Body

Anne Clendening
“Rise up and lift your sword, peaceful warrior. Keep it strong and steady. You've already lived and fought a thousand battles, and you're not here—again—to cower in fear and pain.”
Anne Clendening, Bent: How Yoga Saved My Ass

Evita Ochel
“Yoga does not start or end on your mat, but is present in every breath you take.”
Evita Ochel

“Inner silence is the key to watching birds patiently.”
Mohit Aggarwal

Abhijit Naskar
“Usually, when people hear the term Yoga, many of them associate it with various physical exercises where they need to twist, turn and stretch their body in complex ways that are known as Asanas, but this is only one type of Yoga, called “Hatha-Yoga”. In reality, Yoga is an umbrella term for various physical and mental exercises that lead to the overall well-being of a person.
By origin, Yoga has mainly five forms:
1. Raja Yoga - The realization of divinity through intense meditation
2. Karma Yoga – The realization of divine bliss through your own daily activities and duties
3. Hatha Yoga – The realization of divine well-being through various physical exercises
4. Jyana Yoga – The realization of inexplicable bliss in the pursuit of knowledge
5. Bhakti Yoga – The realization of ecstasy through love and devotion for your Personal God
The purpose of all Yogas is to set your consciousness lose into the vast domain of the unknown, where your brain circuits simulate various fascinating mental states that are usually unimaginable and unattainable in your everyday consciousness. But the whole yoga thing has nothing to do with God or something of that sort. It is all about various states of the human mind.”
Abhijit Naskar, Autobiography of God: Biopsy of A Cognitive Reality

“She tried to do what the Equinox yoga instructor said to do and thank each thought for coming then let it float away, but the thoughts were not floating away and she couldn't force them away, not even here, where she was supposed to be able to escape.”
Stephanie Clifford, Everybody Rise

Gudjon Bergmann
“Despite an ever increasing diversity when it comes to yoga brands, there are only four major paths in yoga and they have the same end goal; enlightenment. The end goal can be likened to the top of a pyramid. Even though people may start climbing the pyramid from different sides, at the end they will reach the same goal and thusly achieve unity.”
Gudjon Bergmann

Darren Main
“Apathy is the bushel basket under which the ego hides its fear of being powerless. It is easier to become apathetic when there are no words or actions sufficient to comfort a wounded body, a grieving heart, or a
shattered community. And so we look away and avoid awkward conversations under the guise that we don’t want to upset others. Yet, the most powerful posture for a healer to take is that of the witness. To stand and
witness a person or community devastated by suffering, and to let them know that while they suffer they have a hand to hold, offers the most potent medicine of all—compassion.”
Darren Main, The River of Wisdom: Reflections on Yoga, Meditation, and Mindful Living

“How did I get IT? Well, I had the balls enough to cry, howl and beg for 'It'. This is the only Way. Get it!”
Fakeer Ishavardas

Anne Clendening
“Sometimes, you can learn something completely mind-blowing in yoga and then totally forget about it the minute you need it the most. Or just kind of choose to forget it. 'I don't need no philosophy, I need fixing.' Which isn't to say nothing ever goes wrong, because it does; or that they're aren't parts of you that you just can't bring yourself to accept or maybe even detest at times (which I know is a strong word but it does apply), because I'm sure there are; or that there's no such thing as catastrophe, because there is. Oh my god, there is. And sometimes all you want to do is fix it.”
Anne Clendening, Bent: How Yoga Saved My Ass

“Yoga is only a means and not the end.”
Paramhansa Yogananda, Autobiography of a Yogi [Hindi]

Sri Joydip
“Habits rules our life and Yoga habits rule our Yoga life”
Sri Joydip, Seven Yoga Habbits That Can Transform Your Life: Seven Yoga Sins to Avoid

Abhijit Naskar
“Real karma or real human duty is the act that is carried out with the genuine hope of bringing a change outside of us – in the world, not in anticipation of reward. And that very act of pure conscience is karma, morality, religion, godliness, spirituality all together. These are all varied terms for the one and the same thing, that is being a conscientious human being. In short, to be a conscientious human is real karma – it is real spirituality – it is real religion.”
Abhijit Naskar

Abhijit Naskar
“The Sanskrit term “Karma” simply refers to “duty”, that is, your everyday duty as a human being. And this duty has no mystical intervention in it – it has no divine law that can determine a certain reward in return. It’s plain ordinary everyday human action.”
Abhijit Naskar

“I see a real yogi as a someone who is committed to growth and to being the best version of themselves, and, at the same time, is courageous enough to be fully present and authentic in each moment. Someone who is not afraid to get real about the whole mess of who they are - the good, the bad, and the ugly”
Baron Baptiste, Perfectly Imperfect: The Art and Soul of Yoga Practice

« previous 1