Wide Awake Quotes

Quotes tagged as "wide-awake" (showing 1-8 of 8)
Shelly Crane
“I turned my face to let his nose rub my cheek. "Mason, let's just stay here," I told him breathlessly.
He chuckled, huskily and dangerously. "Oh, no, absolutely not. I'm not to be trusted with you alone right now.”
Shelly Crane, Wide Awake

Hazrat Inayat Khan
“To a soul which is wide awake, the Judgment Day does not come after death.
For that soul every day is a Judgment Day.
The Judgment Day is every day, and one realizes this as one's sight becomes more keen. Every hour, every moment in life has its judgment.”
Hazrat Inayat Khan

Shelly Crane
“I want to give you back your first kiss, the one that jerk stole from
you. And I want it to be something that even a coma can't make you
forget.”
Shelly Crane, Wide Awake

Shelly Crane
“Love finds you in the strangest places, and hope clings to us in the nooks and crannies we never think to look.”
Shelly Crane, Wide Spaces

Shelly Crane
“What do you want to trust me with tonight?"

A sigh escaped forcefully, waving the white flag that I was a melted, scorched woman at those words.

"Anything," I whispered back.”
Shelly Crane, Wide Spaces

Shelly Crane
“I love how you're so trusting with me," he murmured and leaned in. His lips brushed my cheekbone as he said, "I used to hate it." He sighed, long and meaningful and sexy. "I used to think it was a bad thing to give me so much, but now, when you close your eyes and just hang on for the ride, for whatever I have planned for you?" He took my earlobe between his lips and I gripped him tighter. "That makes me absolutely burn up when you do that.”
Shelly Crane, Wide Spaces

Joyce Rachelle
“I'm not an insomniac. It's just that my mind is in the best position to catch the weight of all hovering possibilities the moment I lie down.”
Joyce Rachelle

Jack Kerouac
“Great laughter rang from all sides. I wondered what the Spirit of the Mountain was thinking, and looked up and saw jackpines in the moon, and saw ghosts of old miners, and wondered about it. IN the whole eastern dark wall of the Divide this night there was silence and the whisper of the wind, except in the ravine where we roared; and on the other side of the Divide was the great Western Slope, and the big plateau that went to Steamboat Springs, and dropped, and led you to the western Colorado desert and the Utah desert; all in darkness now as we fumed and screamed in our mountain nook, mad drunken Americans in the mighty land. We were on the roof of America and all we could do was yell, I guess.”
Jack Kerouac, On the Road