Victor Hugo Quotes

Quotes tagged as "victor-hugo" (showing 1-30 of 91)
Victor Hugo
“A garden to walk in and immensity to dream in--what more could he ask? A few flowers at his feet and above him the stars.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“Marius and Cosette were in the dark in regard to each other. They did not speak, they did not bow, they were not acquainted; they saw each other; and, like the stars in the sky separated by millions of leagues, they lived by gazing upon each other.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“She let her head fall back upon Marius' knees and her eyelids closed. He thought that poor soul had gone. Eponine lay motionless; but just when Marius supposed her for ever asleep, she slowly opened her eyes in which the gloomy deepness of death appeared, and said to him with an accent the sweetness on which already seemed to come from another world:

"And then, do you know, Monsieur Marius, I believe I was a little in love with you."

She essayed to smile again and expired.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“The poor man shuddered, overflowed with an angelic joy; he declared in his transport that this would last through life; he said to himself that he really had not suffered enough to deserve such radiant happiness, and he thanked God, in the depths of his soul, for having permitted that he, a miserable man, should be so loved by this innocent being.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“The book the reader has now before his eyes - from one end to the other, in its whole and in its details, whatever the omissions, the exceptions, or the faults - is the march from evil to good, from injustice to justice, from the false to the true, from night to day, from appetite to conscience, from rottenness to life, from brutality to duty, from Hell to Heaven, from nothingness to God. Starting point: matter; goal: the soul. Hydra at the beginning, angel at the end.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“But secondly you say 'society must exact vengeance, and society must punish'. Wrong on both counts. Vengeance comes from the individual and punishment from God.”
Victor Hugo, The Last Day of a Condemned Man

Victor Hugo
“Querer prohibir a la imaginación que vuelva a una idea es lo mismo que prohibir al mar que vuelva a la playa.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“Hardly had the light been extinguished, when a peculiar trembling began
to affect the netting under which the three children lay.

It consisted of a multitude of dull scratches which produced a metallic
sound, as if claws and teeth were gnawing at the copper wire. This was
accompanied by all sorts of little piercing cries.

The little five-year-old boy, on hearing this hubbub overhead, and
chilled with terror, jogged his brother's elbow; but the elder brother
had already shut his peepers, as Gavroche had ordered. Then the little
one, who could no longer control his terror, questioned Gavroche, but in
a very low tone, and with bated breath:--

"Sir?"

"Hey?" said Gavroche, who had just closed his eyes.

"What is that?"

"It's the rats," replied Gavroche.

And he laid his head down on the mat again.

The rats, in fact, who swarmed by thousands in the carcass of the
elephant, and who were the living black spots which we have already
mentioned, had been held in awe by the flame of the candle, so long as
it had been lighted; but as soon as the cavern, which was the same
as their city, had returned to darkness, scenting what the good
story-teller Perrault calls "fresh meat," they had hurled themselves in
throngs on Gavroche's tent, had climbed to the top of it, and had begun
to bite the meshes as though seeking to pierce this new-fangled trap.

Still the little one could not sleep.

"Sir?" he began again.

"Hey?" said Gavroche.

"What are rats?"

"They are mice."

This explanation reassured the child a little. He had seen white mice in
the course of his life, and he was not afraid of them. Nevertheless, he
lifted up his voice once more.

"Sir?"

"Hey?" said Gavroche again.

"Why don't you have a cat?"

"I did have one," replied Gavroche, "I brought one here, but they ate
her."

This second explanation undid the work of the first, and the little
fellow began to tremble again.

The dialogue between him and Gavroche began again for the fourth time:--

"Monsieur?"

"Hey?"

"Who was it that was eaten?"

"The cat."

"And who ate the cat?"

"The rats."

"The mice?"

"Yes, the rats."

The child, in consternation, dismayed at the thought of mice which ate
cats, pursued:--

"Sir, would those mice eat us?"

"Wouldn't they just!" ejaculated Gavroche.

The child's terror had reached its climax. But Gavroche added:--

"Don't be afraid. They can't get in. And besides, I'm here! Here, catch
hold of my hand. Hold your tongue and shut your peepers!”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Jean Cocteau
“Victor Hugo was a madman who thought he was Victor Hugo”
Jean Cocteau

Victor Hugo
“But alas, if I have not maintained my victory, it is God's fault for not making man and the devil of equal strength.”
Victor Hugo, The Hunchback of Notre-Dame

Stephanie Perkins
“Just imagine! In the early nineteenth century, this cathedral was in such a state of disrepair that the city considered tearing it down. Luckily for us, Victor Hugo heard about the plans to destroy it and wrote The Hunchback of Notre-Dame to raise awareness of its glorious history. And, by golly, did it work! Parisians campaigned to save it, and the building was repaired and polished to the pristine state you find today.”
Stephanie Perkins, Anna and the French Kiss

Victor Hugo
“Ma vie est une énigme dont ton nom est le mot. (My life is an enigma, of which your name is the word.)”
Victor Hugo

Victor Hugo
“So long as there shall exist, by virtue of law and custom, decrees of damnation pronounced by society, artificially creating hells amid the civilization of earth, and adding the element of human fate to divine destiny; so long as the three great problems of the century—the degradation of man through pauperism, the corruption of woman through hunger, the crippling of children through lack of light—are unsolved; so long as social asphyxia is possible in any part of the world;—in other words, and with a still wider significance, so long as ignorance and poverty exist on earth, books of the nature of Les Misérables cannot fail to be of use. HAUTEVILLE HOUSE, 1862. [Translation by Isabel F. Hapgood]”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“The merciful precepts of Christ will at last suffuse the Code and it will glow with their radiance. Crime will be considered an illness with its own doctors to replace your judges and its hospitals to replace your prisons. Liberty shall be equated with health. Ointments and oil shall be applied to limbs that were once shackled and branded. Infirmities that once were scourged with anger shall now be bathed with love. The cross in place of the gallows: sublime and yet so simple.”
Victor Hugo, The Last Day of a Condemned Man

Victor Hugo
“Let no one misunderstand our idea; we do not confound what are called 'political opinions' with that grand aspiration after progress with that sublime patriotic, democratic, and human faith, which, in our days, should be the very foundation of all generous intelligence.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“L’amour est une mer dont le femme est la rive.”
Victor Hugo

Victor Hugo
“The barber ran to the broken window, and saw Gavroche, who was running with all his might towards the Saint Jean market. On passing the barber's shop, Gavroche, who had the two children on his mind, could not resist the desire to bid him "good day", and had sent a stone through his sash.
"See!" screamed the barber, who from white had become blue, "he makes mischief. What has anybody done to this Gamin?”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

“N'être pas écouté, n'est pas une raison pour se taire.”
[Victor HUGO]

Victor Hugo
“La pensée est le labeur de l’intelligence, la rêverie en est la volupté.”
Victor Hugo

Victor Hugo
“Tabahlah saat menghadapi penderitaan besar,
Sabarlah saat menghadapi penderitaan kecil,
Dan kalau anda sudah melaksanakan dengan giat tugas anda sehari-hari,
Pergilah tidur dengan damai.
Tuhan selalu berjaga.”
Victor Hugo

Lewis Spence
“To sum up: all nature-spirits are not the same as fairies; nor are all fairies nature-spirits. The same applies to the relationship of nature-spirits and the dead. But we may safely say that a large proportion of nature-spirits became fairies, while quite a number of the dead in some areas seem to take on the character of nature-spirits. We cannot expect any fixity of rule in dealing with barbaric thought. We must take it as it comes. It bears the same relationship to "civilized" or folk-lore theory as does the growth of the jungle to a carefully designed and meticulously labelled botanical garden. As Victor Hugo once exclaimed when writing of the barbaric confusion which underlies the creative function in poetry: 'What do you expect? You are among savages!”
Lewis Spence, British Fairy Origins

Victor Hugo
“While through the working of laws and customs there continues to exist a condition of social condemnation which artificially creates a human hell within civilization, and complicates with human fatality and destiny that is divin; while the three great problems of this century, the degradation of man in the proletariat, the subjection of women through hunger, the atrophy of the child by darkness, continue unresolved; while in some regions social asphyxia remains possible; in other words, and in still wider terms, while ignorance and povery persist on earth, books such as this cannot fail to be of value.

Hauteville House, I January 1862”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“I wanted to see you again, touch you, know who you were, see if I would find you identical with the ideal image of you which had remained with me and perhaps shatter my dream with the aid of reality.”
Victor Hugo, The Hunchback of Notre Dame

Kelsey Brickl
“There was no justice in rebellion. This Javert had come to believe after seeing Marseille fall headfirst into the abyss of the revolution.”
Kelsey Brickl, Wolves and Urchins: The Early Life of Inspector Javert

Victor Hugo
“Pongámonos de acuerdo en qué es la igualdad, pues si la libertad es la cima, la igualdad es la base. La igualdad, ciudadanos, no es que toda la vegetación esté enrasada, una sociedad de hierbas largas y de robles bajos; un vecindario de envidias que se castren entre sí; es, en el ámbito civil, que todas las aptitudes tengan las mismas oportunidades; en el ámbito político, es que todos los votos valgan lo mismo; en el ámbito religioso, es que todas las conciencias tengan los mismos derechos. La Igualdad tiene un órgano: la instrucción gratuita y obligatoria. El derecho al alfabeto, por ahí es por donde hay que empezar. La escuela primaria obligatoria para todos; la escuela secundaria brindada a todos, ésa es la ley. De la escuela idéntica sale la sociedad igual. ¡La enseñanza, sí! ¡Luz! ¡Luz! Todo viene de la luz y todo va a la luz. Ciudadanos, el siglo XIX es grande, pero el siglo XX será feliz. Y ya no pasará nada que tenga que ver con la historia vieja; no tendremos ya que temer, como ahora, una conquista, una invasión, una usurpación, una rivalidad a mano armada de naciones, una interrupción de la civilización que dependa de un matrimonio de reyes, de un nacimiento en el seno de las tiranías hereditarias, de un reparto de pueblos obra de un congreso, de un desmembramiento porque se hunda una dinastía, de un combate entre dos religiones que choquen de frente como dos carneros del reino de la oscuridad, en el puente de lo infinito; no tendremos ya que temer la hambruna, ni la explotación, ni la prostitución fruto de la desesperación ni el desvalimiento, ni la miseria fruto del paro, ni el patíbulo, ni la espada, ni las batallas, ni todos los robos de salteador del azar en el bosque de los acontecimientos. Casi podríamos decir que ya no habrá acontecimientos. Los hombres serán felices. El género humano cumplirá su ley como cumple la suya el globo terrestre; se restablecerá la armonía entre el alma y el astro; el alma gravitará en torno a la verdad igual que el astro en torno a la luz.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Kelsey Brickl
“In his most thrilling military victory to date, Napoleon had defeated an Ottoman force eighteen thousand men strong at Aboukir. It had been Javert’s first real taste of battle, watching cannon fire blow ships into splinters and hearing the last screams of drowning men. The French army, stinking and spluttering with plague, had emerged victorious but exhausted. They had taken refuge in Alexandria, though it hardly felt safe. Very recently, Napoleon had left with a few of his nearest friends for a voyage into the Delta. Now Javert was just one of the confused mass left reeling in the wake of the chaos.”
Kelsey Brickl, Wolves and Urchins: The Early Life of Inspector Javert

Victor Hugo
“We have here very high towers; a man who should fall from one would be dead before he touched the pavement; when it shall please you to have me to fall, you will not have to even utter a word, a glance will suffice.”
Victor Hugo

Victor Hugo
“Questo ucciderà quello. Il libro ucciderà l’edificio.
L’invenzione della stampa è il più grande avvenimento della storia. E’ la rivoluzione madre. E’ il completo rinnovarsi del modo di espressione dell’umanità, è il pensiero umano che si spoglia di una forma e ne assume un’altra, è il completo e definitivo mutamento di pelle di quel serpente simbolico che, da Adamo in poi, rappresenta l’intelligenza.
Sotto forma di stampa, il pensiero è più che mai imperituro. E’ volatile, inafferrabile, indistruttibile. Si fonde con l’aria. Al tempo dell’architettura, diveniva montagna e si impadroniva con forza di un secolo e di un luogo. Ora diviene stormo di uccelli, si sparpaglia ai quattro venti e occupa contemporaneamente tutti i punti dell’aria e dello spazio..
Da solido che era, diventa vivo. Passa dalla durata all’ immortalità. Si può distruggere una mole, ma come estirpare l’ubiquità? Venga pure un diluvio, e anche quando la montagna sarà sparita sotto i flutti da molto tempo, gli uccelli voleranno ancora; e basterà che solo un’arca galleggi alla superficie del cataclisma, ed essi vi poseranno, sopravvivranno con quella, con quella assisteranno al decrescere delle acque, e il nuovo mondo che emergerà da questo caos svegliandosi vedrà planare su di sé, alato e vivente, il pensiero del mondo sommerso.

Bisogna ammirare e sfogliare incessantemente il libro scritto dall'architettura, ma non bisogna negare la grandezza dell'edificio che la stampa erige a sua volta.
Questo edificio è colossale. E’ il formicaio delle intelligenze. E’ l’alveare in cui tutte le immaginazioni, queste api dorate, arrivano con il loro miele. L’edificio ha mille piani. Sulle sue rampe si vedono sbucare qua e là delle caverne tenebrose della scienza intrecciantisi nelle sue viscere. Per tutta la sua superficie l’arte fa lussureggiare davanti allo sguardo arabeschi, rosoni, merletti. La stampa, questa macchina gigante che pompa senza tregua tutta la linfa intellettuale della società, vomita incessantemente nuovi materiali per l’opera sua. Tutto il genere umano è sull’ impalcatura. Ogni spirito è muratore. Il più umile tura il suo buco o posa la sua pietra. Certo, è anche questa una costruzione che cresce e si ammucchia in spirali senza fine, anche qui c’è confusione di lingue, attività incessante, lavoro infaticabile, concorso accanito dell’umanità intera, rifugio promesso all’ intelligenza contro un nuovo diluvio, contro un’invasione di barbari. E’ la seconda torre di Babele del genere umano."

- Notre-Dame de Paris, V. Hugo”
Victor Hugo, The Hunchback of Notre-Dame

Charles Baudelaire
“By a fatal law, a genius is always an idiot.”
Charles Baudelaire, Correspondance, tome 2 1860-1866

Victor Hugo
“So, kind brother, you refuse me a sol parisis to go and buy a crust from the baker?

“Qui non laborat non manducet.” (He who does not work, let him not eat.)

At this reply from the immovable archdeacon, Jehan hid his face in hins hands, like a woman sobbing, and exclaimed with an expression of despair: Oτoτoτoτoτoτ!”

“What does that mean, monsieur?” asked Claude, surprised by this outburst.

“What? Well,” said the student, raising two insolent eyes to Claude into which he had just stuck his firsts so as to make them look red from weeping, “it’s Greek! It’s an anapaest from Aeschylus which perfectly expresses grief.”
Victor Hugo

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