The Plague Quotes

Quotes tagged as "the-plague" Showing 1-30 of 31
Albert Camus
“On the whole, men are more good than bad; that, however, isn't the real point. But they are more or less ignorant, and it is this that we call vice or virtue; the most incorrigible vice being that of an ignorance that fancies it knows everything and therefore claims for itself the right to kill. The soul of the murderer is blind; and there can be no true goodness nor true love without the utmost clear-sightedness.”
Albert Camus

Jean-Paul Sartre
“I'd come to realize that all our troubles spring from our failure to use plain, clear-cut language.”
Jean-Paul Satre

Albert Camus
“Who taught you all this, doctor?"

The reply came promptly:
"Suffering.”
albert camus

Albert Camus
“I've seen of enough of people who die for an idea. I don't believe in heroism; I know it's easy and I've learned it can be murderous. What interests me is living and dying for what one loves.”
albert camus

Albert Camus
“I've been thinking it over for years. While we
loved each other we didn't need words to make ourselves understood. But people don't
love forever. A time came when I should have found the words to keep her with me, only
I couldn't." - Grant”
Albert Camus, The Plague

Albert Camus
“Sometimes at midnight, in the great silence of the sleep-bound town, the doctor turned on his radio before going to bed for the few hours’ sleep he allowed himself. And from the ends of the earth, across the thousands of miles of land and sea, kindly, well-meaning speakers tried to voice their fellow-feeling, and indeed did so, but at the same time proved the utter incapacity of every man truly to share in suffering that he cannot see.”
Albert Camus, The Plague

Albert Camus
“...since the order of the world is shaped by death, mightn't it be better for God if we refuse to believe in Him and struggle with all our might against death, without raising our eyes towards the heaven where He sits in silence?”
albert camus

Albert Camus
“The love of God is a hard love. It demands total self-surrender, disdain of our human personality. And yet it alone can reconcile us to suffering and the deaths of children, it alone can justify them, since we cannot understand them, and we can only make God's will ours.”
albert camus

Albert Camus
“At that moment he knew what his mother was thinking, and that she loved him. But he knew, too, that to love someone means relatively little; or, rather, that love is never strong enough to find the words befitting it. Thus he and his mother would always love each other silently.”
albert camus

Albert Camus
“In the early days, when they thought this epidemic was much like other epidemics, religion held its ground. But once these people realized their instant peril, they gave their thoughts to pleasure. And all the hideous fears that stamp their faces in the daytime are transformed in the fiery, dusty nightfall into a sort of hectic exaltation, an unkempt freedom fevering in their blood.”
Albert Camus

Albert Camus
“Then, already, it had brought to his mind the silence brooding over beds in which he had let men die. There as here it was the same solemn pause, the lull that follows battle; it was the silence of defeat. But the silence now enveloping his dead friend, so dense, so much akin to the nocturnal silence of the streets and of the town set free at last, made Rieux cruelly aware that this defeat was final, the last disastrous battle that ends a war and makes peace itself an ill beyond all remedy. The doctor could not tell if Tarrou had found peace, now that all was over, but for himself he had a feeling that no peace was possible to him henceforth, any more than there can an armistice for a mother bereaved of a son or for a man who buries his friend.”
albert camus

Albert Camus
“Rats died in the street; men in their homes. And newspapers are concerned only with the street.”
-Albert Camus

Albert Camus
“The only picture of Tarrou he would always have would be the picture of a man who firmly gripped the steering-wheel of his car when driving, or else the picture of that stalwart body, now lying motionless. Knowing meant that: a living warmth, and a picture of death.”
albert camus

Albert Camus
“W ludziach więcej rzeczy zasługuje na podziw niż na pogardę.”
Albert Camus, The Plague

Albert Camus
“Still when abstraction sets to killing you, you've got to get busy with it.”
Albert Camus

Albert Camus
“... though a war may well be "too stupid," that doesn't
prevent its lasting. Stupidity has a knack of getting its way...”
Camus

Albert Camus
“They knew now that if there is one thing that one can always desire and sometimes obtain, it is human affection.”
Albert Camus, The Plague

Michael Flynn
“Hans clacked his side-lips. "Do you have the sentence in your head that tomorrow's procession will halt this pest of yours, that it will bar the small-lives from the High Woods?"
"If it is as you say, no. No more than prayer can stay a charging horse. But that is not why we pray. God is no cheap juggler as to play for a pfennig.”
Michael Flynn, Eifelheim

Michael Flynn
“On the hill opposite, Joachim tolled the midday bell, announcing lunch to the workers in the fields. Klaus listened a moment, then said, "I thought it would be a bleaker scene."
Dietrich turned to him, "What would be?"
"This day. I thought it would be marked by terrible signs - lowering clouds, ominous winds, a crack of thunder. Twilight. Yet, it is so ordinary a morning that I grow frightened."
"Only now frightened."
"Ja. Portents would mean a Divine Mover, however mysterious His moves; and the wrath of an angry God may be turned away by prayer and penance. But it simply happened. Everard grew sick and fell down. There were no signs; so it may be a natural thing, as you have always said. And against nature, we have no recourse.”
Michael Flynn, Eifelheim

Dean Cavanagh
“Jay-Z and Kanye West are to authentic rap culture what diseased rates were to 14th century Europeans”
Dean Cavanagh

Albert Camus
“The furious revolt of the first weeks had given place to a vast despondency, not to be taken for resignation, though it was no the less a sort of passive and provisional acquiescence.”
Albert Camus, The Plague

Albert Camus
“It comes to this: like all of us who have not yet died of plague he fully realizes that his freedom and his life may be snatched from him at any moment.”
Albert Camus

Albert Camus
“All he had gained was to have known the plague and to remember it, to have known friendship and to remember it, to have known affection and to have one day to remember it. All that a man could win in the game of plague and life was knowledge and memory.”
Albert Camus, The Plague

Albert Camus
“Man isn't an idea, Rambert”
Albert Camus, The Plague

Albert Camus
“The townspeople had adapted, they had come to heel, as people say, because that was all they could do. Naturally, they still had an attitude of misfortune and suffering, but they did not feel its sting.”
Albert Camus, The Plague

Albert Camus
“E în regulă. Vom înnebuni cu toții.”
Albert Camus

Albert Camus
“المصائب الكبرى تتسم بالرتابة، ولو لم تكن كذلك إلا لطول أمدها. و الواقع أن الذين عاشوا أيام الطاعون المروعة يذكرون جيدا أنها لم تكن كألسنة اللهب عاتية لا نهاية لها، بل كأقدام تطأ الناس ببطء فتحطم كل شيء في طريقها.”
Albert Camus

Albert Camus
“This figure, which gave a clear meaning to the daily spectacle that everyone in town had in front of their eyes, disconcerted them even more. Up to then people had merely complaine about a rather disgusting accident. Now they saw that there was something threatening in this phenomenon, the extent and origin of which was not yet clear to them.”
Camus Albert

Albert Camus
“Admittedly the number of dead from one day to the next was not rising. But it seemed that the plague had settled comfortably into its peak and was carrying out its daily murders with the precision and regularity of a good civil servant.”
Camus Albert

Albert Camus
“The town was inhabited by people asleep on their feet, who did not really escape from their fate except on rare occasions when, in the night, their apparently healed wound would suddenly open. Then, waking with a start, they would feel around in kind of stupor, their lips smarting, at on stroke rediscovering their pain which was suddenly revived, and with it the devastated features of love.”
Albert Camus, The Plague

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