The Picture Of Dorian Gray Quotes

Quotes tagged as "the-picture-of-dorian-gray" Showing 1-30 of 49
Oscar Wilde
“I find him in the curves of certain lines, in the loveliness and subtleties of certain colours.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“You told me you had destroyed it."

"I was wrong. It has destroyed me.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“I asked the question for the best reason possible, for the only reason, indeed, that excuses anyone for asking any question - simple curiosity.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“Those who find beautiful meanings in beautiful things are the cultivated. For these there is hope.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“because to influence a person is to give one's own soul.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“You became to me the visible incarnation of that unseen ideal whose memory haunts us artists like an exquisite dream.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“There were opium-dens, where one could buy oblivion, dens of horror where the memory of old sins could be destroyed by the madness of sins that were new.”
Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde
“It is quite true that I have worshipped you with far more romance of feeling than a man usually gives to a friend. Somehow, I had never loved a woman. I suppose I never had time. Perhaps, as Harry says, a really grande passion is the privilege of those who have nothing to do, and that is the use of the idle classes in a country”
Oscar Wilde , The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“I can now recreate life in a way that was hidden from me, before.'A dream of form in days of thought:”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“When good Americans die, they go to Paris.'
'Where do bad Americans go?'
'They stay in America.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“It is only intellectually lost who ever argue.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“a beleza, a verdadeira beleza, acaba onde a expressão intelectual começa. O intelecto é já uma forma de exagero e destrói a harmonia de qualquer rosto.”
Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde
“For these treasures, and everything that he collected in his lovely house, were to be to him means of forgetfulness, modes by which he could escape, for a season, from the fear that seemed to him at times to be almost too great to be borne.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“Kad smo srećni, uvek smo dobri; ali, kada samo dobri, nismo uvek srećni.”
Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde
“Siempre se puede ser amable con las personas que no nos importan nada.”
Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde
“Those who find beautiful meanings in beautiful things are the cultivated. For these, there is hope. They are the elect to whom beautiful things mean only Beauty.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“You had leant over the still pool of some Greek woodland, and seen in the water's silent silver the marvel of your own face. And it had all been what art should be, unconscious, ideal, and remote.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“It was a poisonous book. The heavy odour of incense seemed to cling about its pages and to trouble the brain. The mere cadence of the sentences, the subtle monotony of their music, so full as it was of complex refrains and movements elaborately repeated, produced in the mind of the lad, as he passed from chapter to chapter, a form of reverie, a malady of dreaming, that made him unconscious of the falling day and creeping shadows.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“Cloudless, and pierced by one solitary star, a copper-green sky gleamed through the windows.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“Things that he had dimly dreamed of were suddenly made real to him. Things of which he had never dreamed were gradually revealed.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“Might there not be some curious scientific reason for it all? If thought could exercise its influence upon a living organism, might not thought exercise an influence upon dead and inorganic things? Nay, without thought or conscious desire, might not things external to ourselves vibrate in unison with our moods and passions, atom calling to atom in secret love or strange affinity?”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“The tulip-beds across the road flamed like throbbing rings of fire. A white dust, tremulous cloud of orris-root it seemed, hung in the panting air. The brightly coloured parasols danced and dipped lik monstrous butterflies.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“The tulip-beds across the road flamed like throbbing rings of fire. A white dust tremulous, cloud of orris-root it seemed, hung in the panting air. The brightly coloured parasols danced and dipped like monstrous butterflies.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“You fill me with apprehension. The appeal to Antiquity is fatal to us who are romanticists.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“Rəssam estetik gözəllik yaradan adamdır. Sənətin məqsədi özünü və sənətkarı cəmiyyətə tanıtmaqdır. Tənqidçi isə estetik gözəllikdən aldığı təəssüratını yeni forma, yaxud yeni vasitələrlə bölüşdürmək bacarığına malik adamdır.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“Tənqidin ali, ya da aşağı forması – avtobioqrafiya növlərindən biridir. Estetik gözəlliyi olan şeylərdə eybəcər mənalar axtaran adamlar – əxlaqsız adamlardır; və bu tərbiyəsizlik heç də onları cazibəli göstərmir. Bu, böyük qüsurdur.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“Intellect is in itself a mode of exaggeration, and destroys the harmony of any face. The moment one sits down to think, one becomes all nose, or all forehead, or something horrid.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“Was there anything so real as words?”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde
“I am too fond of reading books to care to write them, Mr Eskine. I should like to write a novel certainly, a novel that would be as lovely as a Persian carpet and as unreal. But there is no literary public in England for anything except newspapers, primers, and encyclopædias. Of all people in the world the English have the least sense of the beauty of literature.”
Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde
“I would suggest that we should appeal to Science to put us straight. The advantage of the emotions is that they lead us astray, and the advantage of Science is that it is not emotional.”
Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray

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