The Jungle Quotes

Quotes tagged as "the-jungle" Showing 1-7 of 7
Upton Sinclair
“One of the necessary accompaniments of capitalism in a democracy is political corruption.”
Uptown Sinclair

Upton Sinclair
“…for the game had never been fair, the dice were loaded. They were swindlers and thieves of pennies and dimes, and they had been trapped and put out of the way by the swindlers and thieves of millions of dollars.”
Upton Sinclair

Upton Sinclair
“Here was one more difficulty for him to meet and conquer.”
Upton Sinclair, The Jungle

Upton Sinclair
“Dieve--but I'm glad I'm not a hog.”
Upton Sinclair, The Jungle

Upton Sinclair
“Such were the cruel terms upon which their life was possible, that they might never have nor expect a single instant's respite from worry, a single instant in which they were not haunted by the thought of money.”
Upton Sinclair, The Jungle

Upton Sinclair
“It was so incomprehensible how a man could fail to see it. Here were all the opportunities of the country, the land and the buildings upon the land, the railroads, the mines, the factories, and the stores. All in the hands of a few private individuals, called capitalists, for whom the people were obliged to work, for wages. The whole balance of what the people produced went to heap up the fortunes of these capitalists. To heap, and heap again, and yet again. And that, in spite of the fact that they and everyone about them lived in unthinkable luxury. And was it not plain that if the people cut off the share of those who merely owned, the share of those who worked would be much greater? That was as plain as two and two makes four, and that was the whole of it. Absolutely, the whole of it. And yet, there were people who could not see it. Who would argue about everything else in the world. They would tell you that governments could not mange things as economically as private individuals. They would repeat and repeat that and think they were saying something. They could not see that economical management by masters, meant simply that they, the people, were worked harder, and ground closer, and paid less. They were wage owners and servants at the mercy of exploiters, whose one thought was to get as much out of them as possible.”
Upton Sinclair, The Jungle

Upton Sinclair
“Yet there have been known to be philosophers and plain men who swore by Malthus in the books, and would, nevertheless, subscribe to a relief fund in time of a famine. It was the same with Jurgis, who consigned the unfit to destruction, while going about all day sick at heart because of his poor old father, who was wandering somewhere in the yards begging for a chance to earn his bread.”
Upton Sinclair, The Jungle