Spiritual Disciplines Quotes

Quotes tagged as "spiritual-disciplines" (showing 1-30 of 58)
Charles Haddon Spurgeon
“I must take care above all that I cultivate communion with Christ, for though that can never be the basis of my peace - mark that - yet it will be the channel of it.”
Charles Spurgeon

Andrew Murray
“Ask and you shall receive; everyone that asks receives.  This is the fixed eternal law of the kingdom:  If you ask and receive not, it must be because there is something amiss or wanting in the prayer. Hold on; let the Word and Spirit teach you to prat aright, but do not let go the confidence he seeks to waken:  Everyone who asks receives....Let every learner in the school of Christ therefore take the Master's word in all simplicity....Let us beware of weakening the word with our human wisdom.”
Andrew Murray

“. . .fasting gives me singularly happy afternoons.”
Adalbert De Vogue, Aimer Le Jeune: L'Experience Monastique

“So do not expect always to get an emotional charge or a feeling of quiet peace when you read the Bible. By the grace of God you may expect that to be a frequent experience, but often you will get no emotional response at all. Let the Word break over your heart and mind again and again as the years go by, and imperceptibly there will come great changes in your attitude and outlook and conduct. You will probably be the last to recognize these. Often you will feel very, very small, because when your eyes close for the last time in death, and never again read the Word of God in Scripture you will open them to the Word of God in the flesh, that same Jesus of the Bible whom you have known for so lng, standing before you to take you for ever to His eternal home.”
Geoffrey Thomas, Reading the Bible

“When a person eats shortly before going to bed, digestion accompanies sleep. The two great physiological functions are completed together, leaving the maximum of freedom to the mind during the day.”
Adalbert De Vogue, Aimer Le Jeune: L'Experience Monastique

“In the afternoon the digestion of the meal deprives me of the incomparable lightness which characterizes the fast days.”
Adalbert De Vogue, Aimer Le Jeune: L'Experience Monastique

“As it is the sister of reading, so it is the mother of prayer. Though a man's heart be much indisposed to prayer, yet, if he can but fall into a meditation of God, and the things of God, his heart will soon come off to prayer....Begin with reading or hearing. Go on with meditation; end in prayer....Reading without meditation is unfruitful; meditation without reading is hurtful; to meditate and to read without prayer upon both, is without blessing.”
William Bridge

“The story is told of Mother Theresa that when an interviewer asked her. "What do you say when you pray?" she answered, "I listen." The reporters paused a moment, then asked, "Then what does God say?" and she replied, "He listens." It is hard to imagine a more succinct way to get at the intimacy of contemplative prayer.”
Marilyn Chandler McEntyre, Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies

Gary Rohrmayer
“Fasting is more about longing for the power and presence of Jesus than restricting our appetites.”
Gary Rohrmayer, 21 Days of Prayer & Fasting: A fasting guide for spiritual breakthroughs

Gary Rohrmayer
“Fasting is more about replacing than it is about abstaining — replacing normal activities with focused times of prayer and feeding on the Word of God.”
Gary Rohrmayer, 21 Days of Prayer & Fasting: A fasting guide for spiritual breakthroughs

Gary Rohrmayer
“Fasting is not an option but an assumed practice for the serious-minded follower of Jesus.”
Gary Rohrmayer, 21 Days of Prayer & Fasting: A fasting guide for spiritual breakthroughs

Donald S. Whitney
“From matters as crucial as the death of Jesus, to those as mundane as eating and drinking, the Bible presents the glo ry of God as the ultimate priority and the definitive criterion by which we should evaluate everything.”
Donald S. Whitney, Simplify Your Spiritual Life: Spiritual Disciplines for the Overwhelmed

Gary Rohrmayer
“Fasting turns each moment of craving into a prayer of intense dependence.”
Gary Rohrmayer, 21 Days of Prayer & Fasting: A fasting guide for spiritual breakthroughs

Gary Rohrmayer
“Every time I have fasted I have found my worship experience sweeter, the illumination of God’s Spirit brighter and the hunger for God’s Word stronger.”
Gary Rohrmayer, 21 Days of Prayer & Fasting: A fasting guide for spiritual breakthroughs

Gary Rohrmayer
“The rewards of fasting ultimately lead to a more intimate and satisfying experience with the God who made me.”
Gary Rohrmayer, 21 Days of Prayer & Fasting: A fasting guide for spiritual breakthroughs

Gary Rohrmayer
“Fasting is a discipline that should be a holy habit.”
Gary Rohrmayer, 21 Days of Prayer & Fasting: A fasting guide for spiritual breakthroughs

“The difference between hearing and listening is significant...Listening well means knowing when to interject questions, when to redirect the conversation, and, more importantly, in what terms to interpret the other's narrative. It means recognizing that the speaker is making purposeful choices, consciously or unconsciously, and considering what those purposes might be. It means accepting the tension between making judgments and withholding judgment as the other's story or line of reasoning unfolds. It means hearing and noting the omissions. And it means listening not only through the words spoken, but to them.”
Marilyn Chandler McEntyre, Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies

Gary Rohrmayer
“Fasting is an act of humility that spotlights our weaknesses and reveals dependence on things rather than on God.”
Gary Rohrmayer, 21 Days of Prayer & Fasting: A fasting guide for spiritual breakthroughs

Anthony Bloom
“Because we don't know yet how to act without an outer reason, we discover that we don't know what to do with ourselves, and then we begin to be increasingly bored. So first of all, you must learn to sit with yourselves and face boredom, drawing all the possible conclusions.”
Anthony Bloom, Beginning to Pray

Donald S. Whitney
“Discipline without direction is drudgery.”
Donald S. Whitney, Spiritual Disciplines for the Christian Life

Anthony Bloom
“Generally, it is greed, fear and curiosity which make us live outwardly. A French scientist who worked in America, Alexis Carrel, said in a book called "Man the Unknown" that if you ask yourself where your personality ends you will see that the tongue of a greed person is projected like tentacles towards all the edibles of the world; the eyes of the curious person are like tentacles projected and attached to everything around; the ears of the eavesdropper become long and wide and go far far afield. If you could draw a picture of what you look like in those terms you would see that precious little is left of you inside, because everything is extroverted. So that the first thing one must do is to detach the tentacles and bring them in. You cannot go inwards if you are completely outward.”
Anthony Bloom, Beginning to Pray

“The best listeners I know pause over words. ‘That’s an interesting way of putting it,’ they muse, or they ask. ‘What exactly do you mean by that?’ The consciousness that every word is a choice, that each word has its own resonance, nuance, emotional coloring, and weight informs their sense of what is being communicated. This kind of listening comes close to what we engage in when we listen to music...A good listener loves words, respects them, pays attention to them, and recognizes vague approximations as a kind of falsehood.”
Marilyn Chandler McEntyre, Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies

“The silences in conversation honor and support the words they carry, as water supports the vessels that float on it. Only in silence can the "listening into" take place - the pausing over words, meanings, implications, associations - and the waiting - for the Spirit to speak, for the right response to a surface. At its deepest level, good conversation holds a balance we seek in prayer between speaking and listening, waiting for the unplanned, epiphanic moment that comes unbidden in the midst of what we thought we were pursuing. Those silences also distinguish substantive conversation from idle chatter that fills all the "air time" available, often as a protection against the silences in which a new thought might take us where we're not sure we want to go. When silences are allowed, conversation can rise to the level of sacred encounter.”
Marilyn Chandler McEntyre, Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies

Anthony Bloom
“You cannot, having never prayed before, start with eighteen hours of dialogue and prayer with God continuously like this while you do other things. But you can easily single out one or two moments and put all your energy into them. Simply turn your eyes Godwards, smile at Him and go into it. There are moments when you can tell God 'I simply must have a rest, I have not strength to be with You all the time', which is perfectly true. You are still not capable of bearing God's company all the time. Well, say so. God knows that perfectly well, whatever you do about it. Go apart, say for a moment 'I'll just have a rest. For a moment I accept to be less saintly'.”
Anthony Bloom, Beginning to Pray

Tertullian
“We live in the world with you. We do not forsake forum or bath or workshop, or inn, or market, or any other place of commerce. We sail with you, fight with you, farm with you.”
Tertullian, Tertullian: Apology, de Spectaculis, And, Minucius Felix

“As I grow in my prayer life, my soul becomes a delightfully cluttered attic, filled with random graces that do not all fit together in some perfectly ordered system. The purpose of some graces will be immediately apparent in my life, but the meaning of others might evade me for a while. I must resist the temptation to clean up the messiness of my graces and must not try to come up with immediate answers for the questions that arise from them.”
Mark E. Thibodeaux, Armchair Mystic: Easing Into Contemplative Prayer

Prayer is for listening; review of prayer is for discerning. It is important that I resist the temptation to analyze what is going on. During prayer, I will be tempted to play the sports commentator, reviewing every move with instant replay. I will be tempted to ask myself if the prayer is going well, if it is really God speaking or merely my imagination, if I'm handling this conversation well and so on. This ongoing analysis will only distract me from listening for God with my full attention....I may miss God's voice because I am too preoccupied with evaluating the prayer then and there. During the prayer itself, I must simply be present and listen attentively to whatever is said by whomever. There will be plenty of time to sort it all out later.”
Mark E. Thibodeaux, Armchair Mystic: Easing Into Contemplative Prayer

“Not only do I need friends who share in my desires and convictions, and not only do I need mentors who can support, encourage and advise me as I journey to God, but I also need a community with whom I can participate in the proclamation of the Word and the celebration of all that the Words means to me. Like the baby Jesus, I need a "holy family" to belong to. I need to belong to something bigger than myself. If I don't, then I run the risk of developing a sort of God-and-me spirituality with no support systems to hold me up when I am weak, no prophets to challenge me when I am wrong and no party-mates with whom I may celebrate the Lord's goodness in my life.”
Mark E. Thibodeaux, Armchair Mystic: Easing Into Contemplative Prayer

“The purpose of spiritual direction groups is formation. Spiritual formation is "a process of being conformed to the image of Christ for the sake of others." The intentional goal of group spiritual direction is to help each participant become more aware of God in their lives, for the sake of others.
Alice Fryling, Seeking God Together: An Introduction to Group Spiritual Direction

“...good listeners have a humble perspective. Humility in listening means that we let go of preconceived opinions, we let go of the need to be right, we let go of our own insecurities, and we let go of the need to appear wise, good or spiritual. In short, we let go of ourselves in order to be present to the other. This is a high calling and a commitment we will need to return to again and again.”
Alice Fryling, Seeking God Together: An Introduction to Group Spiritual Direction

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