Shirley Jackson Quotes

Quotes tagged as "shirley-jackson" Showing 1-27 of 27
Shirley Jackson
“Within, walls continued upright, bricks met neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut; silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone.”
Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House

Ruth Franklin
“If one is bewildered and unhappy, why not show it, and why will not people explain and comfort? But instead—this pretense at calm satisfaction, where underneath there is all the seething restless desire to be off, away from all this anger at self and others, to where there are other conventions, other thoughts, other passions.”
Ruth Franklin, Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life

Shirley Jackson
“We started out making men in about the state of mind which I suppose created them in the first place -- we had run out of kinds of women, and had to think of something else.”
Shirley Jackson, Raising Demons

Ruth Franklin
“Telling women’s stories was—and would always be—Jackson’s major fictional project. As she had in The Road Through the Wall and the stories of The Lottery, with Hangsaman Jackson continued to chronicle the lives of women whose behavior does not conform to society’s expectations. Neither an obedient daughter nor a docile wife-in-training, Natalie represents every girl who does not quite fit in, who refuses to play the role that has been predetermined for her—and the tragic psychic consequences she suffers as a result. During the postwar years, Betty Friedan would later write, the image of the American woman “suffered a schizophrenic split” between the feminine housewife and the career woman: “The new feminine morality story is . . . the heroine’s victory over Mephistopheles . . . the devil inside the heroine herself.” That is precisely what happens in Hangsaman. Unfortunately, it was a story that the American public, in the process of adjusting to the changing roles of women and the family in the wake of World War II, was not yet ready to countenance.”
Ruth Franklin, Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life

Shirley Jackson
“She wants her cup of stars.”
Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House

Ruth Franklin
“The very nicest thing about being a writer is that you can afford to indulge yourself endlessly with oddness, and nobody can really do anything about it, so long as you keep writing and kind of using it up, as it were. All you have to do—and watch this carefully, please—is keep writing. So long as you write it away regularly nothing can really hurt you.”
Ruth Franklin, Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life

Shirley Jackson
“Eleanor found herself unexpectedly admiring her own feet. Theodora dreamed over the fire beyond the tips of her toes, and Eleanor thought with deep satisfaction that her feet were handsome in their red sandals; what a complete and separate thing I am, she thought, going from my red toes to the top of my head, individually an I, possessed of attributes belonging only to me. I have red shoes, she thought-that goes with being Eleanor; I dislike lobster and sleep on my left side and crack my knuckles when I am nervous and save buttons. I am holding a brandy glass which is mine because I am here and I am using it and I have a place in this room. I have red shoes and tomorrow I will wake up and I will still be here. 'I have red shoes,' she said very softly, and Theodora turned and smiled up at her.”
Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House

Shirley Jackson
“Around her the trees and wildflowers, with that oddly courteous air of natural things suddenly interrupted in their pressing occupations of growing and dying, turned toward her with attention, as though, dull and imperceptive as she was, it was still necessary for them to be gentle to a creation so unfortunate as not to be rooted in the ground, forced to go from one place to another, heart-breakingly mobile.”
Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House

Ruth Franklin
“Constance and Merricat are indeed “two halves of the same person,” together forming one identity, just as a man and a woman are traditionally supposed to do in marriage. Not finding that wholeness in marriage, Jackson sought it elsewhere … Indeed, the novel, in its final version, is not about “two women murdering a man.” It is about two women who metaphorically murder male society and its expectations for them by insisting on living separate from it, governed only by themselves.”
Ruth Franklin, Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life

Ruth Franklin
“Brown, they would later write, had taught them that the goal of reading and criticizing was "to know and understand, not to like or dislike, and the aim of writing was to get down what you wanted to say, not to gesticulate or impress.”
Ruth Franklin, Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life

Ruth Franklin
“Every description is calculated for what it reveals, both about the character to whom it refers and the person whose attitude it represents ... As always in these descriptions, she has a knack for the unexpected word: tropical fish in a mural swim “insanely,” and the apple trees on Pepper Street produce “wry unpalatable fruit.” In “Notes for a Young Writer,” a lecture on writing fiction composed as advice to her daughter Sarah, Jackson would relish the “grotesque effect” of the “absolutely wrong word”: “ ‘I will always love you,’ he giggled.”
Ruth Franklin, Shirley Jackson: A Rather Haunted Life

Shirley Jackson
“The reassuring bulk of the college buildings showed ahead of her, and she looked fondly up at them and smiled. As she had never been before, she was now alone, and grown-up, and powerful, and not at all afraid.”
Shirley Jackson, Hangsaman

Shirley Jackson
“No, l'aspetto minaccioso del soprannaturale è che attacca la mente moderna dove è più debole, dove abbiamo rinunciato alla corazza protettiva della superstizione senza sostituirla con una difesa d'altro tipo. Nessuno di noi pensa razionalmente che sia stato un fantasma ad attraversare il giardino ieri notte, eppure di sicuro ieri notte a Hill House stava succedendo qualcosa, e il rifugio istintivo della mente - il dubbio - viene meno. Non possiamo dire: "È stata la mia immaginazione", perché c'erano altre tre persone.”
Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House

Shirley Jackson
“Eleanor felt the room rock madly, and time as she had always known time, stop.”
Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House

Shirley Jackson
“Ich versteh dich nicht.« Theodora schmiss ärgerlich ihren Stift hin. »Gehst du immer dahin, wo du nicht erwünscht bist?«
Eleanor lächelte friedfertig. »Ich bin noch nirgendwo erwünscht gewesen«, sagte sie.”
Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House

Shirley Jackson
“Sie schamloser Graubart«, sagte Luke. »Da opfern Sie mich für eine Tasse Kaffee!”
Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House

Shirley Jackson
“oh, meine Güte! Ich dachte, ich weiß, was ich sagen wollte, aber ich sage es sehr schlecht.”
Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House

Shirley Jackson
“Seit dem Tod ihrer Mutter war ihre Schwester der einzige Mensch auf der Welt, den sie aufrichtig hasste.”
Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House

Shirley Jackson
“Nachdem ich nun weiß, wer von uns ich ist', sagte Luke, 'kann ich mich gleich noch näher vorstellen.”
Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House

Shirley Jackson
“»Ich werde so lange im Haus herumlaufen, bis ich in zehn von neun Fällen den Ort finde, wo es was zu essen gibt.”
Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House

Shirley Jackson
“Fear is the relinquishment of logic, the willing relinquishing of reasonable patterns. We yield it or we fight it, but we cannot meet at half way.”
Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House

Shirley Jackson
“No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality; even larks and katydids are supposed, buy some, to dream. Hill House, not sane, stood by itself against its hills, holding darkness within; it had stood so for eighty years and might stand for eighty more. Within, walls continued upright, bricks meet neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut; silence lay steadily against the wood and stone of Hill House, and whatever walked there, walked alone.”
Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House

Shirley Jackson
“In delay there lies no plenty, present mirth hath present laughter.”
Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House

Shirley Jackson
“«Perché dirti addio è l'unica cosa che mi rimane» disse lei. «Perché dopo dovrò continuare all'infinito a fare le stesse cose che ho sempre fatto, ecco perché, e niente resta uguale quando si è diversi».
«Ma non ha senso» disse lui. «Vuoi dire che io sono diverso perché vado via».
«Non capisci» disse lei. Poi: «Guarda, ci riprovo. Tu non sei più il ragazzo che amo. Tu sei il ragazzo che è stato richiamato alle armi. E a me cosa ne viene? Una manciata di minuti per dirti addio. Quando te ne andrai, non avrò più niente, a parte quello che mi lasci. Non voglio passare questi ultimi minuti con il ragazzo che amo che è stato richiamato alle armi».”
Shirley Jackson

Shirley Jackson
“Me imagino que el pueblo estaba lleno de corazones podridos que codiciaban nuestras pilas de monedas de oro, pero eran cobardes y temían a los Blackwood.”
Shirley Jackson

Shirley Jackson
“La comida viene de la tierra y no podemos permitir que se quede allí y se pudra; hay que hacer algo con ella.”
Shirley Jackson, We Have Always Lived in the Castle

Shirley Jackson
“Todas las mujeres de la familia Blackwood habían recogido la comida que daba la tierra y la habían conservado, y los tarros de intensos colores con embutidos y verduras y mermeladas granate, ámbar y verde oscuro estaban uno al lado de los otros y allí se quedarían para siempre, como un poema compuesto por las mujeres de la familia Blackwood.”
Shirley Jackson, We Have Always Lived in the Castle