Sartre Quotes

Quotes tagged as "sartre" Showing 1-30 of 83
Jean-Paul Sartre
“Man is nothing else but what he makes of himself.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism and Human Emotions

Jean-Paul Sartre
“Nothing happens while you live. The scenery changes, people come in and go out, that's all. There are no beginnings. Days are tacked on to days without rhyme or reason, an interminable, monotonous addition.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, Nausea

Jean-Paul Sartre
“There is no human nature, since there is no god to conceive it.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism and Human Emotions

Jean-Paul Sartre
“Still, somewhere in the depths of ourselves we all harbor an ashamed, unsatisfied melancholy that quietly awaits a funeral.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Reprieve

Jean-Paul Sartre
“It isn't freedom from. It's freedom to.”
Jean Paul Sartre

Jenny Offill
“Whenever the wife wants to do drugs, she thinks about Sartre. One bad trip and then a giant lobster followed him around for the rest of his days.”
Jenny Offill, Dept. of Speculation

Jean-Paul Sartre
“Başlangıç olmadığı gibi, son da yoktur. Bir kadın, bir dost, bir kent bir kerede terk edilemez. Hepsi birbirine benzer zaten.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, Nausea

Jean-Paul Sartre
“Faire souffrir c'est posséder et créer tout autant que détruire.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, Baudelaire

Jean-Michel Guenassia
“- Tu es et tu resteras toujours une petite-bourgeoise moraliste. Comme Camus.
- Tu es et tu resteras toujours un petit con prétencieux. Comme Sartre.”
Jean-Michel Guenassia, Le Club des incorrigibles optimistes

Jean-Paul Sartre
“So I was a poodle of the future; I made prophecies.”
Jean-Paul Sartre
tags: sartre

Iris Murdoch
“Sartre turns love into a ‘battle between two hypnotists in a closed room’.”
Iris Murdoch

Roland Barthes
“(Sartre) (The world is full without me, as in Nausea; the world plays at living behind a glass partition; the world is in an aquarium; I see everything close up and yet cut off, made of some other substance; I keep falling outside myself, without dizziness, without blue, into precision.”
Roland Barthes

Martin Heidegger
“Sartre expresses the basic tenet of existentialism in this way: Existence precedes essence. In this statement he is taking existentia and essentia according to their metaphysical meaning, which from Plato's time on has said that essentia precedes existentia. Sartre reverses this statement. But the reversal of a metaphysical statement remains a metaphysical statement. With it he stays with metaphysics in oblivion of the truth of Being.”
Martin Heidegger, Basic Writings: Ten Key Essays, plus the Introduction to Being and Time

“When you live alone, you even forget what it is to tell a story: plausibility disappears at the same time as friends. You let events flow by too: you suddenly see people appear who speak and then go away; you plunge into stories of which you can't make head or tail: you'd make a terrible witness. But on the other hand, everything improbable, everything which nobody would ever believe in a cafe, comes your way.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, Nausea

Jean-Paul Sartre
“In the state I was in, if someone had come and told me I could go home quietly,
that they would leave me my life whole, it would have left me cold: several hours or
several years of waiting is all the same when you have lost the illusion of being eternal.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, The Wall

Jean-Paul Sartre
“This feeling of adventure definitely does not come from events: I have proved it. It’s rather the way in which the moments are linked together. I think this is what happens: you suddenly feel that time is passing, that each instant leads to another, this one to another one, and so on; that each instant is annihilated, and that it isn’t worth while to hold it back, etc., etc. (. . .) If I remember correctly, they call that the irreversibility of time.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, Nausea

Jean-Paul Sartre
“I've dropped out of their hearts like a little sparrow fallen from its nest.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, No Exit and Three Other Plays

“In the heat of the battle, all internal barriers break down; the puppet bourgeoisie of businessmen and shopkeepers, the urban proletariat, which is always in a privileged position, the lumpen-proletariat of the shanty towns - all fall into line with the stand made by the rural masses, that veritable reservoir of a national revolutionary army; for in those countries where colonialism has deliberately held up development, the peasantry, when it rises, quickly stands out as the revolutionary class. For it knows naked oppression, and suffers far more from it than the workers in the towns, and in order not to die of hunger, it demands no less than a complete demolishing of all existing structures. In order to triumph, the national revolution must be socialist”
Jean-Paul Sarte

Jean-Paul Sartre
“Cada día te pareces un poco más al cadáver que serás y yo te amo siempre.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, Le diable et le bon dieu

“The most direct critique [in the TV series The Prisoner] of what might be called the politics-industry of late capitalism, however, is undoubtedly [the episode] “Free for All”, both the funeral dirge for the national mass party and the unofficial founding charter of the New Left. In many ways, “Free for All” is the logical complement to the visual innovations and luminous mediatic strategies of “A., B. & C.”; whereas the latter identifies the space of the editing room as a new kind of cultural zone, and thus transforms a certain visual recursion into a protomorphic video library of images, the former concentrates not on the image per se but on the messages and texts transmitted by such—or what Derrida would identify as the thematic of a dissemination which is never quite identical with what is being disseminated. But where deconstruction and post-structuralism promptly sealed off this potentially explosive insight behind the specialized ghettos of linguistics or ontological philosophy, and thus unwittingly perpetuated precisely the authoritarian monopoly over theory authorized by the ontologies in the first place, the most insightful intellectuals of the New Left (most notably, Adorno and Sartre) would insist on the necessarily mediated nature of this dissemination, i.e. the fact that the narrative-industries of late capitalism are hardly innocent bystanders in the business of accumulation, but play an indispensable role in creating new markets, restructuring old ones, and ceaselessly legitimating, transacting and regulating the sway of the commodity form over society as a whole.”
Dennis Redmond, The World is Watching: Video as Multinational Aesthetics, 1968-1995

“—Pero podría muy bien pensar en ti sólo como en una virtud abstracta, una especie de límite. Puedes agradecerme que recuerde cada vez tu cara.”
Sartre Jean-Paul

Jean Baudrillard
“One way of dying is to make your death alter the state of things in such a way that you no longer have any reason to be a part of it. Thus death can have the effect of a prophetic disappearance. Such were the deaths of Barthes and Lacan, I believe: the world has taken another direction since, in which these subtle figures would no longer have had any meaning. The death of Sartre, by contrast, left the world unchanged and seems an ineluctable, but insignifi cant event. Before dying, he was already to live in a world that was no longer his own.

So far as existence is concerned, as Ajar [Romain Gary] would say, it needs to be taken in charge by someone. No one can be expected to bear the responsibility for their own life. This Christian and modern idea is a vain and arrogant proposition. Moreover, it is a groundless utopian notion. The individual would have to be able to transform himself into the vestal, or the slave, of his identity, control all his circuits and all the circuits of the world which meet in his genes, nerves and thoughts. An unprecedented state of servitude. Who would wish to have salvation at such a price? It is so much more human to put one's fate, one's desire, one's will into the hands of another. Circulation of responsibilities, declension of wills, perpetual transfer of forms . Apart from this subtle path, which is attested to by a great many cultures, there is only the totalitarian path of a collective assumption.”
Jean Baudrillard, Cool Memories

Jean-Paul Sartre
“why distort a past that can no longer stand up for itself?”
Jean-Paul Sartre

Jean-Paul Sartre
“The words I speak are too big for my mouth, they tear it; the load of destiny I bear is too heavy for my youth and has shattered it.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, No Exit and Three Other Plays

Jean-Paul Sartre
“You have to talk to make sure you're alive.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, No Exit and Three Other Plays

Rick Roderick
“In fact this was outrageous to many of his early admirers, that he would become a revolutionary Marxist, because in the United States that always had been associated with Soviet style bureaucratic Marxism and of course then you began to think about the Cold War and all the little films you saw in grade school of Russian kids with their hands hanging on barbed wire, and all that stuff... which actually wasn’t a mode of thought, but was just our mode of propaganda. That doesn’t mean it wasn’t better than their propaganda; events have proven it was… better.”
Rick Roderick

Jean-Paul Sartre
“...people talk a lot about this famous passing of time, but you scarcely see it. You see a woman, you think that one day she will be old, only you don't SEE her grow old. But there are moments when you think you SEE her growing old and you feel yourself growing old with her: that is the feeling of adventure.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, Nausea

Jean-Paul Sartre
“Things are entirely what they appear to be and BEHIND THEM... there is nothing.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, Nausea

Jean-Paul Sartre
“...here we are, all of us, eating and drinking to preserve our precious existence, and that there's nothing, nothing, absolutely no reason for existing.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, Nausea

Jean-Paul Sartre
“...an existent can never justify the existence of another existent.”
Jean-Paul Sartre, Nausea

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