Samuel Beckett Quotes

Quotes tagged as "samuel-beckett" Showing 1-30 of 38
Samuel Beckett
“We are all born mad. Some remain so.”
Samuel Beckett

Samuel Beckett
“The old endless chain of love, tolerance, indifference, aversion and disgust”
Samuel Beckett

Edward Albee
“I am not interested in living in a city where there isn't a production by Samuel Beckett running.”
Edward Albee

Samuel Beckett
“You lean back against the door with bowed head making ready to set out. By the time you open your eyes your feet have disappeared and the skirt of your great coat come to rest on the surface of the snow. The dark scene seems lit from below. You see yourself at the last outset leaning against the door with closed eyes waiting for the word from you to go. To be gone.Then the snowlit scene. You lie in the dark with closed eyes and see yourself there as described making ready to strike out and away across the expanse of light. You hear again the click of the door pulled gently to and the silence before the steps can start. Next thing you are on your way across the white pasture afrolic with lambs in spring and strewn with red placantae.”
Samuel Beckett, Nohow On: Company, Ill Seen Ill Said, Worstward Ho

Samuel Beckett
“If you do not love me I shall not be loved.
If I do not love you I shall not love.”
Samuel Beckett

Samuel Beckett
“My life, my life, now I speak of it as of something over, now as of a joke which still goes on, and it is neither, for at the same time it is over and it goes on, and is there any tense for that? Watch wound and buried by the watchmaker, before he died, whose ruined works will one day speak of God, to the worms.”
Samuel Beckett, Molloy

Samuel Beckett
“HAMM:
In my house.
(pause.)
One day you’ll be blind, like me. You’ll be sitting there, a speck in the void, in the dark, for ever, like me.
(pause.)
One day you’ll say to yourself, I’m tired, I’ll sit down, and you’ll go and sit down. Then you’ll say, I’m hungry, I’ll get up and get something to eat. But you won’t get up. You’ll say, I shouldn’t have sat down, but since I have I’ll sit on a little longer, then I’ll get up and get something to eat. But you won’t get up and you won’t get anything to eat.
(pause.)
You’ll look at the wall a while, then you’ll say, I’ll close my eyes, perhaps have a little sleep, after that I’ll feel better, and you’ll close them. And when you open them again there’ll be no wall any more.
(pause.)
Infinite emptiness will be all around you, all the resurrected dead of all the ages wouldn’t fill it, and there you’ll be like a little bit of grit in the middle of the steppe.
(pause.)
Yes, one day you’ll know what it is, you’ll be like me, except that you won’t have anyone with you, because you won’t have had pity on anyone and because there won’t be anyone left to have pity on.
(pause.)”
Samuel Beckett, Endgame

Samuel Beckett
“It took me a long time, my lifetime so to speak, to realise that the colour of an eye half seen, or the source of some distant sound, are closer to Giudecca in the hell of unknowing than the existence of God, or the origins of protoplasm, or the eistence of self, and even less worthy than these to occupy the wise, It's a bit much, a lifetime, to achieve this consoling conclusion, it doesn't leave you much time to profit by it.”
Samuel Beckett

Samuel Beckett
“Let us do something, while we have the chance! It is not every day that we are needed. Not indeed that we personally are needed. Others would meet the case equally well, if not better. To all mankind they were addressed, those cries for help still ringing in our ears! But at this place, at this moment of time, all mankind is us, whether we like it or not. Let us make the most of it, before it is too late! Let us represent worthily for one the foul brood to which a cruel fate consigned us! What do you say? It is true that when with folded arms we weigh the pros and cons we are no less a credit to our species. The tiger bounds to the help of his congeners without the least reflexion, or else he slinks away into the depths of the thickets. But that is not the question. What are we doing here, that is the question. And we are blessed in this, that we happen to know the answer. Yes, in the immense confusion one thing alone is clear. We are waiting for Godot to come --”
Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot

Samuel Beckett
“Estragon: I remember the maps of the Holy Land. Coloured they were. Very pretty. The Dead Sea was pale blue. The very look of it made me thirsty. That's where we'll go, I used to say, that's where we'll go for our honeymoon. We'll swim. We'll be happy.”
Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot

“Ubi nihil vales, ibi nihil velis: where you are worth nothing, there you should want nothing”
Arnold Geulincx

Johnny Rich
“He thought of hanging himself, to pass the time.”
Johnny Rich, The Human Script

Samuel Beckett
“story … if you could finish it … you could rest … you could sleep … not before … oh I know … the ones I’ve finished … thousands and one … all I ever did … in my life … with my life … saying to myself … finish this one … it’s the right one … then rest …”
Samuel Beckett, Collected Shorter Plays

Wynne McLaughlin
“My Halloween costume is Godot. I'm not showing up at the party, just texting the host every 10 minutes that I'm on my way.”
Wynne McLaughlin

Samuel Beckett
“Gimdyti apsižergus kapą ir kančiose gimti. Duobėje duobkasys svajingai tvarkosi įrankius. Lieka laiko susenti. Ore skamba mūsų riksmai.”
Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot

Samuel Beckett
“Bütün bu şeyler, bazı şeylerin hiçbir anlam taşımamayı sürdürdükleri gibi hiçbir anlam taşımasalar yani sonuna dek anlamsızlıkta direnseler, asla söz edilemezdi bunlardan. Çünkü hiçten söz etmenin tek yolu ondan sanki bir şeymişçesine söz etmektir.”
Samuel Beckett, Watt

“It is as if James Joyce, for his sins, had been forced to grow up in Queens; as if Sam Beckett had been mugged by Godot in a Flushing comfort station; as if Sid Caesar played the part of Moby Dick in a Roman Polanski movie shot underwater in Long Island City; as if Martin Heidegger has gone into vaudeville...Mr. Mano is Tom Wolfe, and Hunter S. Thompson and Henderson the Rain King.”
John D. Leonard

Penelope Fitzgerald
“What’s to become of us? We can’t go on like this.”
“Yes, we can go on like this,” said Cesare. “We can go on exactly like this for the rest of our lives.”
Penelope Fitzgerald

Samuel Beckett
“Neyse ki gözkapaklarını kapamak söz konusu değil burada, yummak gereken ruh aslında, şu boşuna yadsınmaya çalışılan uyanık, kaygılı ruh; limansız, gemisiz, tözsüz, tinsiz gecede bir fenerin içindeymiş gibi debelenip duran ruh.”
Samuel Beckett, Malone Dies

“The punchline of the story relates to an American academic saying of Beckett, 'He doesn't give a fuck about people. He's an artist.' At this point Beckett raised his voice above the clatter of afternoon tea and shouted, 'But I do give a fuck about people! I do give a fuck!”
James Knowlson, Beckett Remembering/Remembering Beckett: A Centenary Celebration

Samuel Beckett
“Cascando"


why not merely the despaired of
occasion of
wordshed

is it not better abort than be barren

the hours after you are gone are so leaden
they will always start dragging too soon
the grapples clawing blindly the bed of want
bringing up the bones the old loves
sockets filled once with eyes like yours
all always is it better too soon than never
the black want splashing their faces
saying again nine days never floated the loved
nor nine months
nor nine lives


saying again
if you do not teach me I shall not learn
saying again there is a last
even of last times
last times of begging
last times of loving
of knowing not knowing pretending
a last even of last times of saying
if you do not love me I shall not be loved
if I do not love you I shall not love

the churn of stale words in the heart again
love love love thud of the old plunger
pestling the unalterable
whey of words

terrified again
of not loving
of loving and not you
of being loved and not by you
of knowing not knowing pretending
pretending

I and all the others that will love you
if they love you


unless they love you”
Samuel Beckett

Samuel Beckett
“Daha çok uluma diye nitelendirebileceklerimi bir yana bırakırsam bence üç tür gülüşün üzerinde durmaya değer; yani acı, zorlama ve neşesiz olanların üzerinde. Bu gülüşleri -nasıl söylesem?- usumuzda art arda oluşan sıyrıklara, çiziklere benzetebiliriz. Birinden ötekine geçişi de azdan çoğa, alçaktan yükseğe, dıştan içe, kabadan inceye, özdekten biçime geçişe. Bugünkü neşesiz gülüş bir zamanlar zorlamaydı, bugünkü zorlama gülüş bir zamanlar acıydı. Ya bugünkü acı gülüş bir zamanlar neydi? Gözyaşlarıydı Bay Watt, gözyaşlarıydı.”
Samuel Beckett

Samuel Beckett
“Ama tuhaf değil mi, bir şeye tamamen dolu olmadığında dolu denirken, bu şey boş değilken boş denmemesi çok tuhaf değil mi?”
Samuel Beckett, Watt

Samuel Beckett
“Watt'ın başka bir koğuşa verilmesinden sonra yeniden karşılaşmamıza kadar belli bir süre geçti. Her zamanki gibi, yani sevdiğim havanın çağrısına uyduğum zamanlardaki gibi bahçemde dolaşıyordum. Watt da benzer biçimde kendi bahçesinde dolaşıyordu. Ama artık aynı bahçe söz konusu olmadığı için karşılaşamıyorduk. Bu yeni karşılaşma, sonunda ileride betimleneceği gibi gerçekleştiğinde, her ikimiz de; Watt da ben de bunu arzulasak, çok daha önce karşılaşabileceğimizi anladık. Ama işte bizde eksik olan karşılaşma arzusuydu. Watt benimle karşılaşmak istemiyordu, ben de Watt ile karşılaşmak istemiyordum. Gerçekten de birbirimizle bir araya gelmek, yeniden dolaşmak ve laflamak düşüncesi düşmanca gelmiyordu bize, hayır, ilgisi yok, yalnızca Watt da ben de buna istekli değildik.”
Samuel Beckett, Watt

Samuel Beckett
“Watt'ın zemin kattaki yaşantısının sonlarına doğru bir gün telefon çaldı ve bir ses Bay Knott'un sağlığının nasıl olduğunu sordu. Kuşkusuz biri dalga geçiyordu. Ses bundan başka, Bir dost, dedi. İnce bir erkek sesi ya da kalın bir kadın sesiydi.
Watt bu olayı aşağıdaki gibi yorumladı:
Cinsiyeti belirsiz bir dostu Bay Knott'un sağlını öğrenmek için telefonla aradı.
Bu yorum çok geçmeden tutarsız bir hal aldı.
Ama Watt'ın bunu tutarlılığa ulaştıracak gücü kalmamıştı. Watt'ın kendini daha fazla yormaya cesareti yoktu.
Kaç kez meydan okumuştu, kendini şu daha fazla yorma tehlikesine. Meydan okuyorum, demişti, meydan okuyorum ve tutarlılığa kavuşturma çabalarına girmişti. Ama şimdi yapamıyordu artık.
Watt artık yorulmuştu zemin katta, zemin kat Watt'ı iyice yormuştu.
Ne öğrenmişti? Hiç!
Bay Knott hakkında ne biliyordu? Hiç!
Gelişmek kaygısından, öğrenmek kaygısından, iyileşmek kaygısından geriye ne kalmıştı? Hiç!
Ama bu da bir şey sayılmaz mıydı?
O zaman kendini öylesine küçülmüş, öylesine umutsuz görüyordu. Ya şimdi? Daha küçülmüş, daha umutsuz. Bu da bir şey sayılmaz mıydı?
Öylesine sayrılı, öylesine yalnız.
Ya şimdi?
Daha sayrılı, daha yalnız.
Bu da bir şey sayılmaz mıydı?
Fazlalık bir şey sayıldığına göre. Olumluluk açısından az olsun, çok olsun. En üstün olma açısından az olsun, çok olsun.”
Samuel Beckett, Watt

Samuel Beckett
“Ama anlama duyulan bu ilgisizlik içinde bu anlam arayışı da ne oluyordu?”
Samuel Beckett, Watt

Samuel Beckett
“მოდიან
სხვები მაგრამ მაინც იგივეები
თითოეული სხვანაირად და მაინც ისე
და თითოეულს სხვანაირად არ უყვარს ისევ
და თითოეულს ზუსტად ისე არ უყვარს ისევ”
Samuel Beckett

Samuel Beckett
“No soy, ¿es menester decirlo?, ni Murphy, ni Watt, ni Mercier -no, no quiero volver a nombrarlos- ni ninguno de los otros, de los cuales he olvidado hasta los nombres, que me dijeron que yo era ellos, que debía intentar serlo, a la fuerza, por miedo.”
Samuel Beckett, The Unnamable

“…[Samuel Beckett’s] diaries contained so little overt condemnation of the Nazis, although no one who has read them could be in any doubt about how much Beckett - who was to join the French Resistance in the war – loathed the regime. …[But] Beckett was quick to pick up on the absurd, such as the story he heard involving a servant and a milkman. In order to prevent Rassenschande [racial impurity], no Aryan servant under forty-five was allowed to work in a Jewish household. When a puzzled milkman asked a Herr Levi’s Gentile housekeeper how come she worked for him she replied that she was partly Jewish. When subsequently her even more perplexed employer asked her why she had lied to the milkman, she replied that she could not possibly admit to being forty-five.”
Julia Boyd, Travellers in the Third Reich

Samuel Beckett
“Ever Tried. Ever Failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.” - Samuel Beckett”
Samuel Beckett

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