Racial Prejudice Quotes

Quotes tagged as "racial-prejudice" Showing 1-30 of 88
Mark M. Bello
“A racist cop pulls over a black driver for little reason other than the fact that the driver is black and a recent robbery was committed by a couple of young black guys in a white community. The cop quickly realizes the driver is not one of the robbery suspects. He sees a man with a wife and two small children. They are not a couple of young punks. Still,he persists. Why?
“He asks to see the driver’s license and registration. While locating the appropriate documents, the black driver respectfully volunteers that he is legally carrying a handgun. The cop panics—is it the image of a black man with a gun? He barks out conflicting orders and then shoots the man
to death, in front of his family. Why? “Is it because the cop is an insensitive racist? Maybe he wasn’t trained or taught any better? Perhaps he lived a completely different life in a completely different world than that of the black man. In this cop’s world, were all black men potential criminals, people to be watched, people to be feared?”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Bryan Stevenson
“Of course innocent mistakes occur but the accumulated insults and indignations caused by racial presumptions are destructive in ways that are hard to measure. Constantly being suspected, accused, watched, doubted, distrusted, presumed guilty, and even feared is a burden born by people of color that can't be understood or confronted without a deeper conversation about our history of racial injustice.”
Bryan Stevenson, Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption

Mark M. Bello
“Can a black man get justice in a sea of white?”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Mark M. Bello
“We’re fighting a form of institutional racism that dates back four hundred years, is embodied in our constitution, and is still alive and well here in the Detroit area.”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Mark M. Bello
“Mr. Bialy said you were a good guy.”
“You don’t want a good guy representing you in situations like this one. You want a barracuda when it comes to dealing with bad cops, negligent police departments, and attorneys who represent them. They are afraid of me; they think I’m a bad guy. Please don’t give away my secret.” Sarah chuckles through her tears. He has an easy way about him. I hope he’s an ass-kicker in court.
“Your secret is safe with me, Zack.”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Mark M. Bello
“It’s up to us, all citizens, regardless of background, to step up to the
plate and address these issues. We need to share our life experiences and offer honest appraisals of the problems we face. We need to do it at kitchen tables all over the nation. In schools, we need to educate our children to celebrate diversity rather than fight or kill over it. We need to promote our core values at home and abroad. That begins with citizens and police officers respecting each other and treating each other as each of us would want to be treated.”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Mark M. Bello
“Until cops stop treating blacks differently than whites, we’re going to have problems.”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Mark M. Bello
“Is this a racial thing, a gun thing, or both?”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Mark M. Bello
“This smells like a case of driving while black through a
predominately white community.”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Mark M. Bello
“Would cops really ignore her cry for help because of the lawsuit?”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Mark M. Bello
“No white person could possibly understand what it is like to be black in America, even someone like me, a descendant of Holocaust victims and survivors.”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

“Through love, tribes have been intermixing colors to reveal a new rainbow world. And as more time passes, this racial and cultural blending will make it harder for humans to side with one race, nation or religion over another.”
Suzy Kassem, Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem

Mark M. Bello
“How do people stand for this? How many people have to die before we rise up and say ‘enough is enough?”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Mark M. Bello
“Lawsuits hold these bastards accountable and make the world safer. Of course, you disagree; everyone you represent is innocent. Is that what you’re suggesting?”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Jennifer Erin Valent
“Daddy didn’t say anything for a minute or so, and then he reached up and caught a firefly as it glowed beside him. “See this light?” he asked me when the firefly lit up his hand.


“Yes’r.”


“That light is bright enough to light up a little speck of the night sky so a man can see it a ways away. That’s what God expects us to do. We’re to be lights in the dark, cold days that are this world. Like fireflies in December.”


“Time meandered on without Gemma’s momma and daddy, and it meandered on without Cy fuller and Walt Blevins. . . but those of us left behind viewed life more dearly, felt it more keenly. I’d learned a bit more about God and I’d seen His powerful hands at work. As I was growing, my heart was changing. And the way I figured it, there were lessons learned in those dark days that would help me for years to come.”


“As I sat on the porch on that December day . . . I leaned my head against the rail and sighed deeply. The way I figured it just then, my summer may have been full of bad luck, but my life wasn’t. I figured as far as family went, I was one of the luckiest girls alive.”
Jennifer Erin Valent, Fireflies in December

Mark M. Bello
“Where is outrage from the National Rifle Association? Where’s the damned NRA? The NRA claims to believe the Second Amendment of the Constitution of the United States grants all of our citizens the right to survive and protect their families with any gun they want. I guess that’s only true when those citizens are Caucasian! Does the Second Amendment apply if you’re a black man driving through a white neighborhood?”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Mark M. Bello
“Can you imagine sitting in the passenger seat and back seat of a car and watching a cop shoot and kill your husband and father?”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Mark M. Bello
“Has racial justice improved? Have we moved on from Reconstruction and Jim Crow? Been lifted by Martin and the Civil Rights Act of 1964? It seems that whenever we take two steps forward, we take a step back . . .”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Mark M. Bello
“This isn’t the end. This isn’t over, not by a long shot. I’m going to make these people pay. One way or another, they’re going to pay.”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Mark M. Bello
“Can a black man succeed today beyond his wildest imagination? Can he experience the so-called American dream? Sure he can! He can overcome bigotry and societal views and ideas that stand in his way. But that doesn’t mean that he, unlike his white counterpart, doesn’t have to rise above adverse societal views and bigotry. . .”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Mark M. Bello
“So, regardless of the outcome, Bialy will be pissing off some segment of his voters. If a grand jury fails to indict or indicts Jones and Bialy fails to secure his conviction; civil rights protests are likely in an already divided Wayne County. If Bialy secures a conviction, he becomes anti-cop or anti-law and order. It’s a classic lose-lose situation.”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Mark M. Bello
“He is so disarming. Must be excellent in court. He probably has juries eating out of the palm of his hand.”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Mark M. Bello
“I’ve been a lawyer in Detroit for a lot of years. I’ve seen the system up close and personal. I’ve seen the charging differences, the sentencing differences, blacks in white towns harassed and pulled over for the crime of simply being there and being black.”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Mark M. Bello
“People who don’t know our city or our officers might conclude these people were targeted BECAUSE they were black.”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Mark M. Bello
“A racist cop pulls over a black driver for little reason other than the fact that the driver is black and a recent robbery was committed by a couple of young black guys in a white community. The cop quickly realizes the driver is not one of the robbery suspects. He sees a man with a wife and two small children. They are not a couple of young punks. Still,he persists. Why?
“He asks to see the driver’s license and registration. While locating the appropriate documents, the black driver respectfully volunteers that he is legally carrying a handgun. The cop panics—is it the image of a black man with a gun? He barks out conflicting orders and then shoots the man to death, in front of his family. Why? “Is it because the cop is an insensitive racist? Maybe he wasn’t trained or taught any better? Perhaps he lived a completely different life in a completely different world than that of the black man. In this cop’s world, were all black men potential criminals, people to be watched, people to be feared?”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

Mark M. Bello
“The fact is that this happens in a white community, with a black man, a gun, and a cop who claims he can’t see the black man’s hands. That combination is a recipe for disaster. It doesn’t matter who tells who what to do.”
Mark M. Bello, Betrayal In Black

“Antiblack violencein Chicago was common since at least the 189-s, when blacks were brought in as strikebreakers. The violence grew with the black population. In the two years leading up to mid-July 1919, whhites bombed more than twenty-five homes and properties owned by blacks in white areas...One bombing killed a little girl...The police never arrested anyone, infuriating blacks.”
Cameron McWhirter

Maya Angelou
“Although there is nothing amusing about racial discrimination, the oppressed find funny things to say about it.

"The white folks are so prejudiced in my town, a colored person is not allowed to eat vanilla ice cream.”
Maya Angelou, A Song Flung Up To Heaven

Guy P. Harrison
“The reality is that racial lynchings were a frequent and normal feature of life in the South. This unique method of murder was a devastating form of terrorism that imposed a constant threat to all black people. The white authority structure did not only tolerate or encourage these killings but used the fear of lynchings to control and oppress black people.”


--“Why White America Must Learn the History of Lynching”, Skeptical Inquirer (December 2020)”
Guy P. Harrison

Guy P. Harrison
“Lynchings in the past have significantly shaped race relations in the present. A killing such as George Floyd’s lands on black people with a much heavier psychological weight because of lynching’s legacy. Too many white people fail to recognize this, and that needs to change. The hurt is too great, the simmering fear and anger too volatile, to bury forever. All Americans who would seek or demand a nation that is fairer to every citizen, less racist, and more peaceful have a responsibility to know this history in detail. … Confronting this ugliness would be difficult for everyone, of course, but it should be attempted. Ignorance and denial certainly have not worked, because this American wound still bleeds.”

-- “Why White America Must Learn the History of Lynching”, Skeptical Inquirer (December 2020)”
Guy P. Harrison

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