Queen Victoria Quotes

Quotes tagged as "queen-victoria" Showing 1-26 of 26
Patricia Briggs
“One of my professors once told me that the last official act of the British monarchy was when Queen Victoria refused to sign a law that made same-sex acts illegal. It would have made me think more highly of her, except the reason she objected was because she didn’t believe women would do anything like that. Parliament rewrote the law so it was specific to men, and she signed it. A tribute to enlightenment, Queen Victoria was not. Neither, as I have observed before, are werewolf packs. ”
Patricia Briggs, Moon Called

Christina Dodd
“I want to talk to you. I want to listen to you. I want to walk with you and, yes, I want you in my bed. That's what I want today. That's what I'll want in a hundred years. If you promise to be my wife forever, I will pledge myself to your happiness.”
Christina Dodd, Rules of Attraction

Jean Plaidy
“But our lives were not as they seemed, were they, Sophia? No one's life ever is.”
Jean Plaidy, The Captive of Kensington Palace

Robert G. Ingersoll
“Compare King William with the philosopher Haeckel. The king is one of the anointed by the most high, as they claim—one upon whose head has been poured the divine petroleum of authority. Compare this king with Haeckel, who towers an intellectual colossus above the crowned mediocrity. Compare George Eliot with Queen Victoria. The Queen is clothed in garments given her by blind fortune and unreasoning chance, while George Eliot wears robes of glory woven in the loom of her own genius.

The world is beginning to pay homage to intellect, to genius, to heart.

We have advanced. We have reaped the benefit of every sublime and heroic self-sacrifice, of every divine and brave act; and we should endeavor to hand the torch to the next generation, having added a little to the intensity and glory of the flame.”
Robert G. Ingersoll, The Liberty of Man, Woman and Child

Jules Verne
“Huzza for the Queen! Huzza for Old England!”
Jules Verne, Five Weeks in a Balloon

“One of the ‘faults’, which Albert attempted to cure her of, and failed, was the Queen’s inability to live in the present. When she was happy, she fended off the future by anticipating it; and dealt with change when it came by dwelling on the past. The band under her window would wake her with a hymn – ‘Now thank we all our God’, or Psalm 100 – while Albert wished her joy so tenderly, so merrily, so lovingly, that she confessed humbly: ‘Often I feel surprised at being so loved, and tremble at my great happiness, dreading that I may be too happy.”
Sarah Ferguson, Victoria and Albert: A Family Life at Osborne House

Shrabani Basu
“The Queen’s family never understood that he had provided her with the companionship over the last decade of her life, which they themselves had not been able to offer.”
Shrabani Basu, Victoria and Abdul: The True Story of the Queen's Closest Confidant

“Both the Queen and Prince Albert seemed to have spent far more time with their children, than one usually associates with Victorian life. They ate together, and walked, rode, played and painted together. And the fond parents were often present at bath time and in the nurseries that Prince Albert had designed close at hand.”
Sarah Ferguson, Victoria and Albert: A Family Life at Osborne House

“Even at Osborne, Albert had to start his day early if he was to get through the relentless agenda that he had set himself. The Queen did not have a private secretary; this role was filled by Albert, and as in every other area of their lives together – in the running of her establishments, in the upbringing of their children, in emotional support – she completely relied on him. He drafted, clarified, advised, and she approved nothing that he did not agree with. This self-imposed task of supporting, and moulding a constitutional monarch, who also made considerable emotional demands on him, would have been burden enough for most men. But for Albert, it was only part of his work, for the German prince had taken on an active role in the cultural life of his adoptive country.”
Sarah Ferguson, Victoria and Albert: A Family Life at Osborne House

“More than husband and consort, Albert was everything to Victoria, and Osborne was unthinkable without him.”
Sarah Ferguson, Victoria and Albert: A Family Life at Osborne House

Courtney Brandt
“My reign has been anything but traditional. Let’s not start now, shall we?”
Courtney Brandt, The Queen of England: Grand Tour

Stanley Weintraub
“Once home [in 1838], Albert prepared a small album of scenes he had drawn on the journey, a dried ‘Rose des Alpes, and a scrap of Voltaire’s handwriting he had obtained from an old servant of the philosopher at Verney, and posted the souvenir to Victoria. Years later she attested it was 'one of her greatest treasures.”
Stanley Weintraub, Uncrowned King: The Life of Prince Albert

“He was always teaching, moulding her, encouraging her to curb her temper; in many ways he was as much a father figure to her as he was her husband; she in turn admired his knowledge and teaching, as she did everything about him.”
Sarah Ferguson, Victoria and Albert: A Family Life at Osborne House

“Oh! It is dreadful...that one is almost always separated from those ones loves dearly and is encumbered with those one dislikes. -Queen Victoria”
Cecil Woodham-Smith, Queen Victoria, From her Birth to the Death of the Prince Consort

“One of the very few valid criticisms of Queen Victoria is that she was not sufficiently concerned with improvement of the conditions in which a great mass of her subjects passed their lives. She lived through an age of profound social change, but neither public health, nor housing, nor the education of her people, nor their representation, engaged much of her time.”
Cecil Woodham-Smith, Queen Victoria, From her Birth to the Death of the Prince Consort

“In the midst of affection and longing the iron hand appeared within the velvet glove....”
Cecil Woodham-Smith, Queen Victoria, From her Birth to the Death of the Prince Consort

“The Queen (Victoria) wrote generously to her mother, 'I quite understand your feelings on the occasion of Sir John Conroy's death. . . I will not speak of the past and the many sufferings he entailed on us by creating divisions between you and me which could never have existed otherwise, they are buried with him.. For his poor wife and children I am truly sorry."
Thanking the Queen for her letter the Duchess of Kent wrote 'Yes, Sir John Conroy's death was a most painful shock. I shall not try and excuse the many errors that unfortunate man committed, but it would be very unjust if I allowed all the blame to be thrown on him. I am in justice bound to accuse myself. . . I erred in believing blindly, in acting with out refection. . . I allowed myself unintentionally to be led led to hurt you, my dearest child, for whom I would have given at every moment my life! Refection came always too late, but not the deserved punishment! My sufferings were great, very great. God be praised that those terrible times are gone by and that only death can separate me from you My beloved Victoria.”
Cecil Woodham-Smith, Queen Victoria, From her Birth to the Death of the Prince Consort

“The Duchess (of Kent) was a duck who had hatched a swan.”
Cecil Woodham-Smith, Queen Victoria, From her Birth to the Death of the Prince Consort

“As much as Vicky loved her husband and he her, Fritz was not a man to demand anything from his august parents, not respect or even respectful treatment for his wife.”
Jerrold M. Packard, Victoria's Daughters

“After nine births of her own, Victoria was unsympathetic to any complaints her daughters had about their pregnancies, though she was still willing and indeed anxious to help at the deliveries.”
Jerrold M. Packard, Victoria's Daughters

“In her diary entry of June 15, the day her husband died , Vicky (Victoria, Princess Royal of England, wife of Frederick III German Emperor) wondered, 'why does pain not kill immediately?”
Jerrold M. Packard, Victoria's Daughters

“It is said that the portions of the journal covering the years 1832-61 were preserved by an order from King Edward VII and that they were typed from the originals. Beatrice is said not to have been aware of this act. If this is true, these copied portions have not been released to the public.”
Jerrold M. Packard, Victoria's Daughters

“Both the Queen and Prince Albert seemed to have spent far more time with their children, than one usually associates with Victorian life. They ate together, and walked, rode, played and painted together. And the fond parents were often present at bath time and in the nurseries that Prince Albert had designed close at hand.”
Sarah Ferguson Duchess of York

Leslie Carroll
“Victoria was, at the time, far more empathetic and forgiving, chiding Albert for his narrow view of humanity. 'I always think that one ought always to be indulgent towards other people, as I always think, if we had not been well brought up and well taken care of, we might also have gone astray.”
Leslie Carroll, Notorious Royal Marriages: A Juicy Journey Through Nine Centuries of Dynasty, Destiny, and Desire

Stanley Weintraub
“Albert wrote to his ‘dearest cousin’ on 26 June to offer his 'sincerest felicitations on that great change which had taken place in your life’. It was a difficult letter to compose. Now that she was 'Queen of the mightiest land of Europe’, he went on, 'the happiness of millions’ lay in her hands, and he trusted that Heaven would assist her in 'that high but difficult task.” He hoped for a long and happy - and glorious - reign, in which she would achieve the 'thankfulness and love’ of her subjects. He wished neither to be indiscreet nor to 'abuse’ her time, but, he closed, 'May I pray you to think likewise sometimes of your cousins in Bonn, and to continue to them that kindness you favoured them with till now.’ And he signed it as 'your Majesty’s most obedient and faithful servant, Albert’.”
Stanley Weintraub, Uncrowned King: The Life of Prince Albert

Stanley Weintraub
“The next day she (Victoria) pulled down some of her old diaries, perhaps to recall Lezhen’s part of her life, and came to a passage in 1839 where she had written of her ‘happiness’ with Melbourne. Now, with both Melbourne and Lezhen gone she noted ‘1st October, 1842. Wrote & looked over & corrected my old journals, which do not now awake very pleasant feelings. The life I led then was so artificial & superficial, & yet I thought I was happy. Thank God! I now know what real happiness means.”
Stanley Weintraub, Uncrowned King: The Life of Prince Albert