Prosperity Gospel Quotes

Quotes tagged as "prosperity-gospel" Showing 1-20 of 20
Criss Jami
“Any halfway clever devil would decorate the highway to Hell as beautiful as possible.”
Criss Jami, Healology

Criss Jami
“I pity the man who praises God only when things go his way.”
Criss Jami, Healology

Criss Jami
“The ultimate story of success: When a nobody, who has never once in his entire life known the feeling of being remembered or respected, suddenly snaps and becomes a world dictator. On one hand it sounds just, but on the other, it illustrates the reason why a prosperity message has and needs its limitations.”
Criss Jami, Killosophy

Kate Bowler
“I would love to report that what I found in the prosperity gospel was something so foreign and terrible to me that I was warned away, but what I discovered was both familiar and painfully sweet: the promise that I could curate my life, minimize my losses, and stand on my successes. And no matter how many times I rolled my eyes at the creeds outrageous certainties, I craved them just the same. I had my own Prosperity Gospel, a flowering weed grown in with all the rest.”
Kate Bowler, Everything Happens for a Reason: And Other Lies I've Loved

“Televangelists preach a corrupted perversion of Christ's socialist teachings. Prosperity gospel is predatory capitalism masquerading as religion.”
Oliver Markus Malloy, American Fascism: A German Writer's Urgent Warning To America

Criss Jami
“When you find that a theology has nothing more to offer than what the world already offers, then that theology as a theology is impractical, and therefore, useless.”
Criss Jami, Killosophy

Criss Jami
“It is in the nature of man to want what he does not have. This modern concern for happiness seems a real testimony of its absence.”
Criss Jami, Healology

Criss Jami
“Of course, if one does not fully trust the promise of God's Kingdom, he will have a hard time taking risks and making sacrifices in this life. A gospel centered around the temporal self - fleeting happiness, earthly success, vain prosperity, things such as these - is the primary ambition of the half-hearted Christian; the one who somewhat believes he is subject to an eternal death; the one who just might believe in men before God, who morbidly fears seeming less than anyone else. The man of this school feels deeply that he has but one life to live, that this must be his only chance, and therefore must have it all in his favor - from glory to comfort to riches - and have it right this instant. He is but hinting that he is overcome because he insists always that he must overcome, that his judgment comes now and by the persons around him. The point is, however, in this sense, that by grace the Christian is indeed free, but only for as long as he wants to be free - the practicality of true freedom: that of God which offers not so much freedom to be like the world as it does freedom from the pressures of having to be like the world. For Divine Law is based solely on love and freedom; whereas secular law, pressure and imitation.”
Criss Jami, Healology

Eric Metaxas
“Another version of the “Prosperity Gospel” or “Name It and Claim It” teaching has to do with finding a verse in the Bible and then “claiming” that verse. Proponents of this thinking believe that God must fulfill his promise to us in whatever verse we are “claiming” because what God says in his Word, the Bible, is true, and we can trust it to be true.

So someone might pray: God, your Word says in Isaiah that by your stripes we are healed and I know you are not a liar and that your Word is true and I claim that Scripture in Jesus’s name and therefore I will be healed of this stomachache!

We need to have faith in what the Bible says, but we have to be careful that we aren’t trying to force God to do what we want. That is arrogance rather than humility.God loves us, but we cannot demand things of him as though our faith is in charge rather than God.

If someone believes it is our faith that heals us and forgets that it is God who does it, we should ask that person how much faith Lazarus had.

Remember, he was decomposing in a tomb when Jesus raised him from death. His faith obviously didn’t matter. It was all God. It is God and God’s grace that heals, not our prayers and not our “faith.” Though we are exhorted by God to pray to him, we cannot compel him to do what we wish.”
Eric Metaxas, Miracles: What They Are, Why They Happen, and How They Can Change Your Life

“At the judgement seat of Christ more than one faith-confessing charismatic will have to sputter out a reason why he chose to claim classy cars instead of countries.”
David Shibley, A Force in the Earth: The Move of the Holy Spirit in World Evangelization

“Prosperity obscures rather than reveals how much fallen humans love God. "Blessings" easily turn into curses as sinners subtly ( or not so subtly) come to love and trust the blessings more than the bless-er.”
Jon Bloom

Mark Hitchcock
“The greatest danger to the church today is not humanism, paganism, atheism or agnosticism. The greatest danger is not increasing hostility against our faith from the culture. Our greatest danger is apostasy on the inside, arising from false teachers- theological liberals who deny and distort biblical doctrine and lead others down the same path.”
Mark Hitchcock, The Coming Apostasy: Exposing the Sabotage of Christianity from Within

“Trying to get prosperity through seed of faith is running after shadows”
Sunday Adelaja

“Trying to get prosperity through prophet offering is running after shadows”
Sunday Adelaja

“Discover your gift and talent, then start a process of production with it if you desire to be prosperous”
Sunday Adelaja

“Trying to get prosperity through laying of hands is running after shadows”
Sunday Adelaja

“Miracle focus messages compels masses to think that the process of production is not necessary for prosperity”
Sunday Adelaja

“Power and wealth only leads into great destruction.”
daniellewis

Eric Metaxas
“Another version of the “Prosperity Gospel” or “Name It and Claim It” teaching has to do with finding a verse in the Bible and then “claiming” that verse. Proponents of this thinking believe that God must fulfill his promise to us in whatever verse we are “claiming” because what God says in his Word, the Bible, is true, and we can trust it to be true. So someone might pray: God, your Word says in Isaiah that by your stripes we are healed and I know you are not a liar and that your Word is true and I claim that Scripture in Jesus’s name and therefore I will be healed of this stomachache! We need to have faith in what the Bible says, but we have to be careful that we aren’t trying to force God to do what we want. That is arrogance rather than humility. God loves us, but we cannot demand things of him as though our faith is in charge rather than God.

If someone believes it is our faith that heals us and forgets that it is God who does it, we should ask that person how much faith Lazarus had. Remember, he was decomposing in a tomb when Jesus raised him from death. His faith obviously didn’t matter. It was all God. It is God and God’s grace that heals, not our prayers and not our “faith.” Though we are exhorted by God to pray to him, we cannot compel him to do what we wish.”
Eric Metaxas, Miracles: What They Are, Why They Happen, and How They Can Change Your Life

“Messages focused on miracle will breed in the mind of people the mentality that production is not necessary for prosperity”
Sunday Adelaja