Portia Quotes

Quotes tagged as "portia" (showing 1-8 of 8)
William Shakespeare
“Beshrew your eyes,
They have o'erlook'd me and divided me;
One half of me is yours, the other half yours,
Mine own, I would say; but if mine, then yours,
And so all yours.”
William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice

William Shakespeare
“He will fence with his own shadow.”
William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice

W.H. Auden
“Portia we can admire because, having seen her leave her Earthly Paradise to do a good deed in this world (one notices, incidentally, that in this world she appears in disguise), we know that she is aware of her wealth as a moral responsibility, but the other inhabitants of Belmont, Bassanio, Gratiano, Lorenzo and Jessica, for all their beauty and charm, appear as frivolous members of a leisure class, whose carefree life is parasitic upon the labors of others, including usurers. When we learn that Jessica has spent fourscore ducats of her father’s money in an evening and bought a monkey with her mother’s ring, we cannot take this as a comic punishment for Shylock’s sin of avarice; her behavior seems rather an example of the opposite sin of conspicuous waste. Then, with the example in our minds of self-sacrificing love as displayed by Antonio, while we can enjoy the verbal felicity of the love duet between Lorenzo and Jessica, we cannot help noticing that the pairs of lovers they recall, Troilus and Cressida, Aeneas and Dido, Jason and Medea, are none of them examples of self-sacrifice or fidelity. […] Belmont would like to believe that men and women are either good or bad by nature, but Antonio and Shylock remind us that this is an illusion; in the real world, no hatred is totally without justification, no love totally innocent.”
W.H. Auden, The Dyer's Hand

William Shakespeare
“Think you I am no stronger than my own sex being so father'd and husbanded?”
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
“I’ll prove the prettier fellow of the two and wear my dagger with the braver grace”
William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice

Hannah Barnaby
“She had never met Caroline's mother, but she knew a thing or two about what happened when someone went far away, how after a time you couldn't see their faces anymore when you closed your eyes or hear exactly how they laughed at a joke, how they seemed less like a real person whom you loved and more like a character in a story. And once that happened, it was easy, too easy, to let them float away like milkweed.”
Hannah Barnaby, Wonder Show

W.H. Auden
“After Portia has trapped Shylock through his own insistence upon the letter of the law of Contract, she produces another law by which any alien who conspires against the life of a Venetian citizen forfeits his goods and places his life at the Doge’s mercy. […] Shakespeare, it seems to me, was willing to introduce what is an absurd implausibility for the sake of an effect which he could not secure without it: at the last moment when, through his conduct, Shylock has destroyed any sympathy we may have felt for him earlier, we are reminded that, irrespective of his personal character, his status is one of inferiority. A Jew is not regarded, even in law, as a brother.”
W.H. Auden, The Dyer's Hand

William Shakespeare
“Hvis det var lige saa let at gøre, hvad der er godt, som at vide, hvad der er godt at gøre, saa blev Kapeller til Kirker, og Fattigfolks Rønner til fyrstelige Paladser.”
William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice