Physics Quotes

Quotes tagged as "physics" Showing 61-90 of 683
Pierre Teilhard de Chardin
“The time has come to realise that an interpretation of the universe—even a positivist one—remains unsatisfying unless it covers the interior as well as the exterior of things; mind as well as matter. The true physics is that which will, one day, achieve the inclusion of man in his wholeness in a coherent picture of the world.”
Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, The Phenomenon of Man

Ben Aaronovitch
“This is why magic is worse even than quantum physics. Because, while both spit in the eye of common sense, I've never yet had a Higgs bosun turn up and try to have a conversation with me.”
Ben Aaronovitch, Whispers Under Ground

J. Richard Gott III
“If you see an antimatter version of yourself running towards you, think twice before embracing.”
J. Richard Gott, Time Travel in Einstein's Universe: The Physical Possibilities of Travel Through Time

George Pólya
“Mathematics is the cheapest science. Unlike physics or chemistry, it does not require any expensive equipment. All one needs for mathematics is a pencil and paper.”
Polya George

Lee Smolin
“One possibility is: God is nothing but the power of the universe to organize itself.”
Lee Smolin

Neil deGrasse Tyson
“While the Copernican principle comes with no guarantees that it will forever guide us to cosmic truths, it's worked quite well so far: not only is Earth not in the center of the solar system, but the solar system is not in the center of the Milky Way galaxy, the Milky Way galaxy is not in the center of the universe, and it may come to pass that our universe is just one of many that comprise a multiverse. And in case you're one of those people who thinks that the edge may be a special place, we are not at the edge of anything either.”
Neil deGrasse Tyson, Death by Black Hole: And Other Cosmic Quandaries

Brian Greene
“Physicists have come to realize that mathematics, when used with sufficient care, is a proven pathway to truth.”
Brian Greene, The Fabric of the Cosmos: Space, Time, and the Texture of Reality

Richard P. Feynman
“Physicists like to think that all you have to do is say, these are the conditions, now what happens next?”
Richard P. Feynman

George Gamow
“It took less than an hour to make the atoms, a few hundred million years to make the stars and planets, but five billion years to make man!”
George Gamow, The Creation of the Universe

Stephan Pastis
“I recently forced myself to read a book on quantum physics, just to try and learn something new. I was confused by the middle of the first sentence and it all went downhill from there. The only thing I can remember learning is that a parallel universe can theoretically be contained on the head of a needle. I don't really know what that means, but I am now more careful handling needles.”
Stephan Pastis

Brian Greene
“Assessing existence while failing to embrace the insights of modern physics would be like wrestling in the dark with an unknown opponent.”
Brian Greene

Lee Smolin
“Some string theorists prefer to believe that string theory is too arcane to be understood by human beings, rather than consider the possibility that it might just be wrong.”
Lee Smolin, The Trouble with Physics: The Rise of String Theory, the Fall of a Science and What Comes Next

Brian Greene
“...quantum mechanics—the physics of our world—requires that you hold such pedestrian complaints in abeyance.”
Brian Greene, The Elegant Universe: Superstrings, Hidden Dimensions, and the Quest for the Ultimate Theory

Bill Gaede
“A mathematician is a magician who converts adjectives into nouns: continuous into continuum, infinite into infinity, infinitesimal into location, 0D into point, 1D into line, curved into geodesic...”
Bill Gaede, Why God Doesn't Exist

Jacques Monod
“Among all the occurrences possible in the universe the a priori probability of any particular one of them verges upon zero. Yet the universe exists; particular events must take place in it, the probability of which (before the event) was infinitesimal. At the present time we have no legitimate grounds for either asserting or denying that life got off to but a single start on earth, and that, as a consequence, before it appeared its chances of occurring were next to nil. ... Destiny is written concurrently with the event, not prior to it... The universe was not pregnant with life nor the biosphere with man. Our number came up in the Monte Carlo game. Is it surprising that, like the person who has just made a million at the casino, we should feel strange and a little unreal?”
Jacques Monod, Chance and Necessity

“What's the matter? What's the antimatter? Does it antimatter?”
Wes Nisker

Wolfgang Ernst Pauli
“Es gibt keinen Gott und Dirac ist sein Prophet. (There is no God and Dirac is his Prophet.)

{A remark made during the Fifth Solvay International Conference (October 1927), after a discussion of the religious views of various physicists, at which all the participants laughed, including Dirac, as quoted in Teil und das Ganze (1969), by Werner Heisenberg, p. 119; it is an ironic play on the Muslim statement of faith, the Shahada, often translated: 'There is no god but Allah, and Muhammad is his Prophet.'}”
Wolfgang Pauli

Stephen Hawking
“The people who actually make the advances in theoretical physics don't think in these categories that the philosophers and the historians of science subsequently invent for them”
Stephen Hawking, Black Holes and Baby Universes

Ursula K. Le Guin
“Privacy, in fact, was almost as desirable for physics as it was for sex.”
Ursula K. Le Guin, The Dispossessed

“...rather than ask why something happened (i.e. what caused it), Jung asked: What did it happen for? This same tendency appears in physics: Many modern physicists are now looking more for "connections" in nature than for causal laws (determinism).”
M.-L. von Franz

Max Planck
“The highest court is in the end one’s own conscience and conviction—that goes for you and for Einstein and every other physicist—and before any science there is first of all belief.”
Max Planck, The Dilemmas of an Upright Man: Max Planck and the Fortunes of German Science, with a New Afterword

Primo Levi
“He was a physicist, more precisely an astrophysicist, diligent and eager but without illusions: the Truth lay beyond, inaccessible to our telescopes, accessible to the initiates. This was a long road which he was traveling with effort, wonderment, and profound joy. Physics was prose: elegant gymnastics for the mind, mirror of Creation, the key to man's dominion over the planet; but what is the stature of Creation, of man and the planet? His road was long and he had barely started up it, but I was his disciple: did I want to follow him?”
Primo Levi

“Love is a chemical reaction,
But it cannot be fully understood or defined by science.
And though a body cannot exist without a soul,
It too cannot be fully understood or defined by science.
Love is the most powerful form of energy,
But science cannot decipher its elements.
Yet the best cure for a sick soul is love,
But even the most advanced physician
Cannot prescribe it as medicine.


INCOMPLETE SCIENCE by Suzy Kassem”
Suzy Kassem, Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem

Felix Alba-Juez
“There is no problem more difficult to solve than that created by ourselves.”
Felix Alba-Juez, Galloping with Sound - The Grand Cosmic Conspiracy

Alan Sokal
“Thus, by science I mean, first of all, a worldview giving primacy to reason and observation and a methodology aimed at acquiring accurate knowledge of the natural and social world. This methodology is characterized, above all else, by the critical spirit: namely, the commitment to the incessant testing of assertions through observations and/or experiments — the more stringent the tests, the better — and to revising or discarding those theories that fail the test. One corollary of the critical spirit is fallibilism: namely, the understanding that all our empirical knowledge is tentative, incomplete and open to revision in the light of new evidence or cogent new arguments (though, of course, the most well-established aspects of scientific knowledge are unlikely to be discarded entirely).

. . . I stress that my use of the term 'science' is not limited to the natural sciences, but includes investigations aimed at acquiring accurate knowledge of factual matters relating to any aspect of the world by using rational empirical methods analogous to those employed in the natural sciences. (Please note the limitation to questions of fact. I intentionally exclude from my purview questions of ethics, aesthetics, ultimate purpose, and so forth.) Thus, 'science' (as I use the term) is routinely practiced not only by physicists, chemists and biologists, but also by historians, detectives, plumbers and indeed all human beings in (some aspects of) our daily lives. (Of course, the fact that we all practice science from time to time does not mean that we all practice it equally well, or that we practice it equally well in all areas of our lives.)”
Alan Sokal

Criss Jami
“Credentials are like potential energy, the compliments of a name on paper, in documents, word of mouth, but faith is like kinetic energy, the motion and the force that which is witnessed. Hence in the end it is the faith rather than the credentials that really takes you places.”
Criss Jami, Killosophy

Felix Alba-Juez
“Why is it so difficult for us to think in relative terms? Well, for the good reason that human nature loves absoluteness, and erroneously considers it as a state of higher knowledge.”
Felix Alba-Juez, Who was Right: Ptolemy or Copernicus?

Louis de Broglie
“Many scientists have tried to make determinism and complementarity the basis of conclusions that seem to me weak and dangerous; for instance, they have used Heisenberg's uncertainty principle to bolster up human free will, though his principle, which applies exclusively to the behavior of electrons and is the direct result of microphysical measurement techniques, has nothing to do with human freedom of choice. It is far safer and wiser that the physicist remain on the solid ground of theoretical physics itself and eschew the shifting sands of philosophic extrapolations.”
Louis de Broglie, Nouvelles perspectives en microphysique

“One hundred thirty-seven is the inverse of something called the fine-structure constant. ...The most remarkable thing about this remarkable number is that it is dimension-free. ...Werner Heisenberg once proclaimed that all the quandaries of quantum mechanics would shrivel up when 137 was finally explained.”
Leon M. Lederman, The God Particle: If the Universe Is the Answer, What Is the Question?

Richard Rhodes
“The landed classes neglected technical education, taking refuge in classical studies; as late as 1930, for example, long after Ernest Rutherford at Cambridge had discovered the atomic nucleus and begun transmuting elements, the physics laboratory at Oxford had not been wired for electricity. Intellectual neglect technical education to this day.

[Describing C.P. Snow's observations on the neglect of technical education.]”
Richard Rhodes, Visions of Technology: A Century of Vital Debate About Machines Systems and the Human World